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Full text of "Seamen's Journal (Sept.10,1919-Sept.1,1920)"

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INDEX-VOLUME THIRTY-THREE 

SEPTEMBER 10, 1919— SEPTEMBER 1, 192Q"'l' A Ti;' i ii.V-i;.'; 



All editorial matter is designated by an 
asterisk (*). 

Title No. Page 

A 

"Abangarez" Case, The 51 1 

Abuse No Argument * 28 6 

Accident Insurance * 29 6 

Accidents — see Court Decisions 

Aerial Record, Another * 20 6 

Africa — see South Africa 

After-the-War-Problems (bv Chester M. 

Wright) 13 1 

Agitator, The Outside 13 9 

Airplanes, Xew Use For * 6 6 

Alaska Coal 14 2 

Alaska Fishermen's Accounts (Public 

Accountant's Report) 41 2 

Alaska Fishermen's Agrcemnct 35 1 

Alaska Fishermen's Union Death List.. 22. 9 

.Alaska, Lesson of 5 1 

Alaska, Mining In 29 11 

American Federation of Labor — 

Asylum, The Right of 29 10 

Gompers Pleads for Policemen 3 7 

Protest Against .\nti-Strike Legisla- 
tion 12 1 

New Trophies for A. F. of L. * 13 7 

Government Broke Pledge .Asserts 

Gompers 14 3 

The A. F. of L. Conference * (Dec. 13) 14 7 

Labor's New Bill of Rights 18 1 

A. F. of L. :Membership * 19 6 

A. F. of L. Political Policy 25 1 

Labor's Political Banner Unfurled.... 32 3 

Death of Mrs. Gompers * 36 7 

Convention Call (A. F. of L.) il 9 

American Idea." "The * 41 6 

American Library Assn.. Program of.. 28 1-6 

American Names 24 11 

American Shipping, etc. — see V. S. Ship- 
ping 

.■Americanization (By \\'. B. Rubin).... 20 9 

Americanization Plan, A Sham 29 10 

Americans, Do They Go To Sea.-" * 1 f" 

Amsterdam Conference, The 5 10 

Anglo-Saxon Speech, Our * 41 7 

Arbctration, Anti-Strike Laws, Etc. — 

Atlantic Fishermen's Wages (Report 

of Arbitration Board) 1-7; 27-9 

Anti-Strike Law 6 10 

Making Strikes Unlawful (Cummins 

bill) 12 1 

Anti-Strike Laws I'' ^ 

Strikes, Efforts to Outlaw 17 1 

Kansas Anti-Strike Law * 22 6 

No Compulsory Arbitration (By Vic- 
tor A. Olander) 33 1 

Anti-Strike Laws Abroad * 33 7 

"Aquitania," A Visit to the 51 H 

Asiatics, Exclusion, Etc. — 

No Slave Labor! 3 2 

Japanese Birth Rate *(in California).. 3 6 

Japan's Labor Troubles * 6 6 

Japanese Seamen Restive * 7 7 

Why India Starves 7 9 

Shipyards in China 10 11 

Asiatics and Discipline * 11 6 



Title No. Page 

What Perry Did * 15 6 

Japan's Experiments * 22 6 

Japanese In Bolivia 24 9 

.-Asiatics In America * 2>2 6 

Orientals Menace Fisheries 7i2 7 

Chinese on British Ships }>2 9 

Why Japs Should Be Barred ?>?> 3 

AVhy Not Enforce the Law (Re Jap- 
anese F"ishermen) . . . ." 40 2 

Oriental Seafarers' L^nion at New 

York 45 8 

Atlantic and Gulf Coasts — 

Atlantic Fishermen's Wages (Report 

of Arbitration Board) 1-7; 27-9 

Atlantic Marine Cooks, Text of 
Agreement with British Cooks' 

Union 21 9 

Atlantic and Gulf Section of Journal — 

see page 8 and 9. Issues 38, 40 to 51 

P'oreword by James H. Williams.... 38 8 
Peace By Negotiation (Re new agree- 
ments signed by Atlantic and Gulf 

Seamen's unions) 40 8 

•■Brookfield" }ihitiny. The 41-8:52-1 

New -Agreements The (A. & G. C. 

Seamen's) 42 11 

Safe So Far 43 8 

Same Old Howl 44 8 

Oriental Seafarers" L'nion at New 

York 45 8 

■■.\m I My Brother's Keeper?'' 46 8 

Passes Refused 47 2 

Before the Mast " 47 S 

A Mutiny Af¥l<lavit (Byrnes v.';. "Lake 

ShoK£'-') ■.. -t" 9 

.\tlantic Sunrise, -An 48 8 

^Masters. Mates and Men 49 8 

Sailors' Election, The -lO 8 

Too True! ?0 ^ 

Biter Bitten, The -^H 9 

A Hand Hold -^1 8 

Salving of Bark '"Superior" .'il ''^ 

Australian Seamen, Etc. — 

-Australian Doings * 8 6 

-Australia's Shipping -Act 23 

-Australian Seamen .Against War (-A 

Praiseworthy Aim * ) 

-Australian Notes * •"'- ^ 

Co-operation in New Zealand '^^2 8 

6 

Banks For Workers 38 1 

Belgian Shipping Notes * 48 6 

Belgium's ■Merchant Marine 46 11 

Benson on the Jones Act * 44 6 

Berlin, Cost of Living in 27 9 

Bolsheviks, High and Low 23 11 

Bolshevism in Early Greece 48 2 

Bolshevism in Kansas 37 3 

Bombast and Recklessness (by Chester ^ 

M. Wright) I-"' ' 

Bonus System For Seamen * 49 6 

Bonuses vs. Bones * 31 7 

Books— see also Libraries, etc 

Books and Education * 28 6 

Books of the Sea 34 9 

Books On The Seven Seas 46 9 



Title No. Page 

Booze For The Wealthy 2 9 

Boston Police Strike, The 9 9 

Brass Check, The (A Study of Ameri- 
can Journalism) 23-2; 46-2 

British vs. German Seamen 34 2 

British Columbia Seamen Defeat Se- 
cession * 14 6 

British Columbia Seamen's Strike *.... 38 7 

British Columbia Seamen Win Strike *. 39 7 

British Seamen .Active * 36 6 

British Seamen's Wages * (Interesting 

Report, An) 39 6 

British Shipbuilding ..; 34 9 

British .Shipping Notes * 46 7 

British Shipping War Losses * 15 6 

British Troops In Russia 15 8 

British vs. .American Ships 48 7 

Brothers of the North 8 9 

Bucko Mate Gets His (Barkentine "City 

of Galveston") 42 2 

Buckoes. A Precious Pair (S.S. "Lake 

Giltedge") 38 7 

Business and Patriotism * (Re Danish 

.Seamen's Strike) 44 6 

C 

California's Big Trees 36 7 

California Ferryboatmen * 51 6 

California ".Soviet,'' .A * (State Lhiiver- 

sity) 27 6 

California State l-'ederation of Labor 

Convention 7-2 : 6* 

Captain Kidd's Jvi4K . . .''i 1 

Canada's Shipyards " ' 43 7 

Canadian S. S. Line, New * . - 51 7 

"Carnegie," Work of the 39 8 

Channel, Tunnel, The 24 9 

Cheap Meat Campaign, The i':-' 1 1 

Child Welfare, Standards for 9 3 

Chinese — See Asiatics. 

Citizenship of Licensed Officers on U. S. 

Ships (Executive Order) 25 9 

Civilization vs. h'ood Supply 43 1 

"Closed" Shop, The * 16 6 

Colored Seamen, -A Word for 39 11 

Coal from .Alaska 14 2 

Coal Miners, The * (See also ''Injunc- 
tion in Coal Miners' Strike") 3 7 

Coal Profit Exposed 14 2 

Coast Guard. Our 47 2 

Columbus, Christopher, Finances 17 2 

Company Unions Suicide 3 9 

Compass Control Stations * 43 6 

Compulsory Military Training 33 7 

Concrete Ships 32 11 

Conscription — A Threat '^ 34 7 

Conscription Bills, The Rival 1 H 

Cook, John, Career of 25 11 

Co-operative Movement, The — 

Labor Joins Co-operatives 4 3 

Co-operative Movement, The 14 1 

Co-operative Banks for Labor (by F. 

C. Howe) -6 2 

The Way to Co-operation 21^ 2 

An Effective Remedy ■* ,• -J '' 

Co-operative Crew and Cargo 51 9 

British Co-operatives ^ 11 

Italian Seamen Co-operate * 48 6 

Co-operation in New Zealand ■"'2 » 



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Title 



No. Page 



Credit Banks for Workers (bv Frederic 

C. Howe) 4i 1 

Crops Decrease. VVliy 47 11 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

-Seamen's Half Pav ( Dillon vs. 

"Strathearn") ' 1-7: 2-7 

Seamen and the Courts (Review of 
Court Decisions in the New Re- 
public) 4 1 

Old Rule in Salvage Cases * 9 7 

Danish Law in U. S. Court 11 Id 

Court .Awards Maintenance (S. S. 
"Gudrun") 13 9 

"The Seamen's Contract" * (liy Wal- 
ter Macarthur) 14 6 

.Seamen's Demand for Half Wapcs 
(Philips, et al.. vs. Br. Stnir. "Suth- 
erland") 17 9 

.Occidents .Aboard Ship * (S. S. 

"Cricket") 22 6 

$4..S00 for a Foot (Harrah vs. Stnir. 

"Simla") 26 W 

Seamen's Act I'pheld in U. S. Su- 
l>reme (?oulti ,•!( PiUji'i^"!:*. S. .'•Sr'-, 
"Streatheaijif >:; ;,/.■.•..;.". ■; ■ .• .| /-3fl!6.* ; 32-1 
"Poughkecpsi'c" 'Cas'e,' The . * .'il-l': 3*2-6*; 49-1 
Coinpeftsatilii Aor'lWV.cie.s; . . .'.•;.•:! .;■.. '•]i--i 1 1 
.Accident>..«.%Vr.(l«r:ft,^..: „• . . ...*.•. j. /♦'!•. ii'.'.. 2 
.Seamen's Rijjhts Delined (Court Rul- 
ing .Against Imprisonment) 37 1 

Seamen Win Their Case (Re Ship- 
ping .Articles on S. S. "Qiioque") . . .37 7 

Seamen's Compensation * 38 o 

"Brookfield" "Mutiny" Case 41-8: .=;2-l 

F.ye Balsam (Frank Brandt vs. Schr. 

"George D. F.dmonds") 42 8 

Meaning of "Act of God" 44 7 

Liatiilitv of Shipowners (Berg vs. 

Philadelphia and Reading R. R. Co.i 47 1 
Insufficient I'ood as Cause of Deser- 
tion (Richard X'anderploeg vs. Bark 

"Hougomont" ) 47 7 

"Commencement of X'oyage" 50 7 



Daniels' (Sec'y of Xavy) Record 22 10 

Danish Seamen's Strike (Business an<l 

Patriotism * ) 

"Dead Reckoning" 

Deaths in Industry * 

Democracy — Majority Rule (by Milu 

Tupper Maynard) 

Denmark, Shipping in 

Derelicts, lluntiTig 

Dictators, Old and Xew 

Direct .Action Loses 

Discipline. .Maintaining * 

Discontent a Good Sign 

Disease and Famine 

Dividends on Shipping 

Diving Mark Questioned 

Dutch .Seamen's Strike * 29 

Dutch Seamen's Strike, The 

Oiilch Shiphiiildinil * 



44 


6 


47 


11 


3':^ 


7 


16 


7 


U 


? 


39 


2 


31 


11 


8 


7 


42 


6 


16 


9 


36 


9 


34 


11 


49 


9 


-6; 


32-6 


41 


1 


46 


/ 



Flat Less— Why ? * 28 6 

Eddystone Lighthouse. The 34 7 

Education on British Ships (Minutes of 

Conference) 2^ 7 

F'lectric Propulsion 27 9 

Elephants as Sv^immers 6 11 

Immigration Only Xormal .^ 10 



I'abricatcd ShiiJs * 4 6 

Farragut's F'lagship P>urned 41 11 

Fear, The Significance of 28 11 

Fees for Jobs * 31 6 

Finland's Forests 28 2 

F'inland. Shipbuilding in 49 6 

First Aid 5 2 

Fisheries, Etc. — 

Treaty on Salmon l-'ishing Signed... 1 .^ 
.Atlantic Fishermen's Wages (Report 

of Arbitration Board) 1 7 

Fish Protection * 2 7 

Fisheries Menaced by Orientals 32 7 

The Salmon I'ishermen * 32 7 

.Alaska F'ishermen's Agreement 3.^ 1 

Britain's Fish Supplies 40 I') 

Fishermen to Build Cannery " 48 7 

Proposed Fisheries Treaty * .^2 6 

Harvest of the Sea, The .^2 9 

Shark Fishing .^2 10 

Floating Fairs * .^1 6 

Fool Strikes 4 9 

Foreigners Leaving U. S 7 11 

{■"ranee and Life Saving 39 11 



Title 



No. Page 



Title 



No. Page 



F'reeboard Rules for Ships 40 1 

F^reedom of Speech 26 10 

F'rench .Merchant Marine. The * 4.^ 7 

F"rozen Meat Trade 34 2 

Fuel of the F'uture. The * 2.^ 6 

Furuseth, Andrew, Articles by. Etc. — 

.Minority Report on Rowe Bill 8 1 

Government by Injunction 11 1 

Autocracy — Old and New ...16-1: 17-2 

.Anti-Strike Laws Based on Bolshe- 
vism 26 3 

Furuseth's Opinion of Kent 43 11 

Labor and Freedom (Address in 

Springfield. 111.) 4.^ 1 



Gary — Indu.>»trial Autocrat * 

Gasoline Turns Earth 

"Gassed" on the Schooner "King Cyrus' 

Geography, Women in 

German Naval Losses 

Germany, Shipbuilding in 

Germany's Shipping Reviving * 

Giant Liners. Nu More * 



1/ 
38 
12 
17 
37 
36 
37 
4.i 



2 
9 
2 

11 



Government Ownership, Etc. — 

"Sharing the Risk" (Plumb Plan).... 3 11 

(iovernment Ownership, For 4 10 

Sabotage, Xew Form of (on V. S. 

Railroads) 11 2 

Seamen's -Attitude Toward "U. S. Op- 
eration of Ships" * 24-6; 27-6 

The Railroad Muddle (Roads Re- 
turned to Private Owners) 27 7 

.Seamen Denied Right to Sue Gov- 
ernment-owned Ships 30 1 

(iovernment Ownership * 30 6 

Great Lakes — 

Lake Carriers' .Association Attitude 

Toward Seamen * 30 7 

Lake Carriers' Welfare Plan 43 2 

Steel Trust Imxposed (bv I'atrick 

O'Brien) .' 49 8 

Thick Weather! (bv Victor .A. Olan- 

der) 

Greek Seamen Send -Message * 

Greenland. Flowers in 

Guam — .America's Siberia * 

Gyroscope Stabilizers * 

H 

Harbors of the Initure 4 11 

Health Conservation 14 9 

Hindus, Persecuting the 14 7 

Holland. .Seamen's Wa.ges in 1 2 

Housing Problem. The 48 2 



Incentive to Rail Workers .^1 9 

India, A F'amine Scene in 46 11 

liiclin's First Labor Paper 43 2 

India Rubber Police * 44 6 

Industrial .Autocracy .Must Go 7 10 

Industrial Conference at Washington * 

(Oct. 6-21).. 2-6: 3-7: 10-6. 7; 11-6; 29-1; 3.=;-6 
Industrial Conference (Second), Re- 
port of 29 1 

Industrial Councils .\broad 16 2 



iO 


1 


44 


7 


3 


■> 


19 


6 


46 


6 



Injunctions — 

Injunction. The 



in Coal Miners' Strike 



.12-2, 6' 

Injunction — .Articles bv .Andrew Furu- 
seth " 11-1; 16-1 

"More Injunctions" in -S. 1". Bay Ship- 
yards Strike ' 24 2 

Italian Seamen Become Shipowners *..48 6 

Italy Buys l-'oreign Ships * 47 6 

Italy's War Shipping Losses 1.^ 2 

Interchnreh World Movement 46 7 

International Seaiarers' Federation — 

Seafarers' Conference, The * 3? 6 

Seafarers' Conference, The 38 8 

I. S. F. Secretariat, The * 40 6 

Genoa Conference, The * 43 6 

F"rom Xew York to Genoa (Notes by 
Editor Scharrenberg on the S. S. 

"Canopic") 43 7 

Genoa Conference. The 46 1 

Olander's Comment on Genoa Confer- 
ence (Thick Weather) .iO 1 

British Seamen Will Fight Genoa 

Decision * .^2 7 

International Seamen's Union of America — 

Do .Americans Go to .Sea?* 1 6 

F'ifty-Seven Thousand Strong * 2 6 

Sapping the Seamen's .Act * 5 6 



Petition and Memorial to Congress.. 7 1 

Convention Call (I. S. U. of A.) 7 7 

l-uruseth's Minority Report (On H. K. 
8069) ". 8 1 

American Seamen Protest * (Rowe 

bill) 9 6 

E(|ualizing Seamen's Wages (Investi- 
gaion by Department of Labor).. 10-1; 11-7 

Before and After * (Rosseter on Sea- 
men's .Act) 15 6 

The Second Message to Seamen (A 

Booklet Worth While *) 16 6 

Proceedings of 23rd -Annual Conven- 
tion 19-1; 20-1; 21-1 

"Petition and .Memorial'' on F"rcedoni. 19 6 

Work of the Convention * 21 6 

Internation Relations, Report of Com- 
mittee on 21 9 

F.tiiciency of the Seamen's -Act (By S. 
B. Axtell) 23 1 

U. S. Operation of Ships * (Resolution 

on Government Ownership) 24-6; 27-6 

Membership of the I. S. U. of A. * . . 26 6 

Is It a Handicap?* (Re Seamen's Act) 33 6 

Seamen's Law Flouted 36 1 

l-riendlv to Seamen's Act * (W. J. 

Powell) 37 6 

liill II. R. 10378 * (Jones Act) 38 6 

Seamen's Act Reviewed (by R. C. 

McKennie) 39 1 

Another Reactionary Bill (H. R. 

12396) ■■■ ; 39 6 

Maritime Compensation' * 43 6 

Advance -Abolished 43 8 

Inspection Rules .Amended * 47 6 

Merchant Marine Act, The * (1920).. 47 6 

Seamen's Clothing * 50 6 

Growth of the I. S. U. of A. * 50 7 

Amendments to La Follette Act 

(Jones .Act) 52 7 

J-K 

Japanese — See .Asiatics 

Johnson Hiram W.. Record of * 34 6 

Krupp Plant. The 30 9 



Labor and Capital Confab * (at Wash- 
ington, D. C.) 2-6, 3-7; 10-6, 7; 11-6 

Labor and Education * . . 25 7 

Labor and Politics * 26 6 

Labor's Demand for Voice in .Manage- 
ment of Industry (by Matthew 

Woll) 1 1 

Labor I'orces the I-'ighting 50 2 

Labor Shortage, The 48 1 

Labor's Responsibility * (for High Cost 

*f Living) 25 6 

Labor's Responsibility (.Argument 

.Against Incorporation of Unions).. 35 7 
La Follette on Vandalism ( British 

Policy in India) 22 7 

La Follette. Robert M.. .Appreciation 

for 27 7 

Lake of Soda -33 9 

Lattice Cargo Derricks 44 2 

Laws of War at Sea 24 11 

Lawyers, Government by * 12 6 

Lawyers In the Majority (in Congress) 12 9 

Lenin, Personality of 33 2 

Liberty I'.onds. Don't Sell Vour 50 II 

Libraries Aboard Ship. .. .28-1, 6*; 31-6*: 45-6* 

Libraries — See also Books, etc 

Lincoln on Property Rights 30 2 

Lloyd's Shipping Register 41 7 

Load Line. The * 10 '> 

I -oans to Europe 3.i 11 

Longshoremen's Strike, The * (San 

Francisco) 3-6: 16-7 

Lloyds World's Shipping Statistics 3 1 

Log Rafts, Dangerous * 3 6 

Lumber. Facts -About 4 9 

Lusitania Inquiry, The 25 2 

Lynch Law (By VV. B. Rubin) 28 9 

M 

Maguire, Judge Jas. G., Death of *..42-6: 43-2 
Manning of American Ships (Number of 

Men Involved) 24-9; 27-1 

Mapping. High Cost of 22 9 

M ess-Rooms and Mess-Boys * 17 <> 



Mexico — 

Why Intervention— .Also For Whom' 2 

Our Treaty With Mexico -"^ 

War With Mexico— Why ? 15 

Mexican War Policy 45 

Middlemen, The * '6 

Minimum Wage F'or Women * -""1 

Mooney Defense, The — 



3 
6 
1 
3 
7 
6 
11 



503 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUiME THIRTY-THREE 



Title 



Mutiny Story, A (on U. S. Transport 
"America") 19 

"Mutiny" on the S.S. "Poughkeepsie" 

31-1; 32-6*; 49-1 



No. Page 
9 



N 

National Marine Exposition 44 11 

Natural Resources * 4 6 

North Sea Mines, Clearing 9 2 

Norway's Ban on Spirits 8 11 

O. 

Oceans, Age of the 1 10 

Ocean Mystery. Another 39 9 

Ocean Pasturage 30 7 

, Ocean, Products . I'Vom the 4,S 11 

Ohio Comepsation System 51 2 

Oil, The Supremacy of * 29 6 

Oil vs. Coal 50 2 

Oregon's Standing Timber 1 9 

Organized Workers, Proportion of the 

(by J. W. Sullivan) 11 3 



Paint, Deadly Effect of 1 3 

Palmer in History 35 8 

Panama Canal, Operation of for Yeiir 

Ending June 30, 1919 16 11 

Pan-.-\merican Labor Unity (Call for 

Con\ention) in Mexico City 24 1 

Paper Trust, The * 32 7 

Parcel Post Service ''' 33 7 

Passengers on Warships 2S 9 

Past and Present * 35 6 

Pension Bill Signed 40 3 

Pension Law, Federal 8 3 

"Platform Guarantees"?* 11 6 

Poetry — 

The Remedy (hy Thomas H. West).. 46 9 

The Sea (by Lola Gornal ) 49 9 

The Clipper Ship (bj- Tliomas J. 

Murray) 51 9 

Political Policy of Labor — See American 
Federation of Labor. 

Politics and I'roliteering (bv Chas. M. 

Kelley) ' 32 2 

I'orto Rican Methods 42 3 

"Poughkeepsie," Case of Alleged Mu- 
tiny 31-1; 32-6*; 49-1 

"Pride In One's Work" 39 9 

Prisoners of War 22 2 

] 'roduction Decreased 40 11 

Profiteer Hanged 41 2 

Proliteering Must Go 44 1 

Protiteering Skipper, A 41 2 

Progress Through Democracy 2 I 

Professor Talks, The * 35 6 

Prohibition Takes I'lffect (Good-Hve 

"John B" * 20-6; 22-11 

President Wilson's Industrial Confer- 
ence * (Oct. 6-21) 2-6; 3-7: 10-6, 7; 11-6 

"Puako" Case Reviewed 5 7 

Public Opinion * ' 13 6 



Rah Rah Scabs. The 44 11 

Repudiated Loans * (Russia) 1 7 

Right to Strike. The 51 7 

Rhythm in Industry 51 9 

Rights (?) of Small Peoples. Tyrol ... . 31 9 

Russia's Resources * 35 6 

Russia, What's Doing In 31 7 



Sabotage by Private Owners 5 11 

Sahara, A Farm in 13 11 

Sailors' Homes, Do We Need? (bv 

Capt. F. E. Uttmark) 28 2 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific — 

Nationality Statistics * 1 6 

Simonsen, Christ E„ Obituary * 5 7 

Delegates' Report (California State 

Federation of Labor) 7 2 

A Word on Secession '■ (P.ritish Co- 
lumbia Branches) 14 6 

Fritz, H. A., alias Fisher. Exposed *. 19 7 

The Union's 35th .Anniversary * 26 6 

British Columbia Seainen's Strike. 

The * 38 7 

British Columbia Seamen Win Strike * 39 7 
Maguire, Judge Jas. G., Resolutions 

on Death of 42 6 

Vale, Our Friend! (Re Judge Maguire) 43 2 

DECEASED MEMBERS 

Abrahamson, Axel W 12 7 

Aguinlar, Olegario 35 7 

Amtsfeld, Fredrick 41 7 



Title 



No. Page 



Andersen, Harald ^... 38 7 

Andersen, Julius 2 7 

Anderson, Albert 33 7 

Anderson. John 28 7 

Andree, Ernest A 9 7 

Baker, Joseph Smith 34 7 

Blackwell. George A 31 7 

Bohle, Dennis 8 7 

Brakhage, Charles 7 7 

Case. Ralph E 9 7 

Campbell, John 45 7 

Carlsen, Frank 52 7 

Castillo, Jose 2 7 

Claus, Johan Rudolph Carl 51 7 

Corner, Stephen 29 7 

Daly, John R 33 7 

Damm, Peter 22 7 

Dcmetre, George 36 7 

Drysdale, Hugh 18 7 

Fvensen, Edwin Martin 16 7 

Evensen, Emil 16 7 

Fisher, Charles A 16 7 

Fondahn, .August 7 7 

Fredriksen, Birger D 17 7 

Friis. Henrv 18 7 

Go\ertsen, Jacob 9 7 

Graham, David 14 7 

GraifF, Edward 24 7 

Hedlund, Olof 6 7 

Hedman. Erick C 12 7 

Hillig. Johan A 17 7 

Holme, Adolf 17 7 

Holnistrom, Julius P 2 7 

Jacobsen. Jacob 22 7 

Jacolisen, Oscar 47 7 

Johansen, Ludvig 3 7 

Johanson, Charles 52 7 

Jones, Frederick 12 7 

Kazapis. John 6 7 

Kean. John 23 7 

Larsen, Hans 24 7 

I.arsen, Jorgen 26 7 

Lebeke. Albert F 11 7 

Lonngren. Eric B 23 7 

Lopez, Francisco 23 7 

Lorents, Isaak 27 7 

Madseu. Frode F 17 7 

Magnusson, Lars 11 7 

Mailer. John 42 7 

.McGo\ern, Richard 33 7 

Mann, Henry 18 7 

.Mattson. Car! .Anton 38 7 

Michelsen, Hans A. R 12 7 

Mikkelsen, Charles 26 7 

Moberg. Carl G. f,. 26 7 

Alonte, Frank 26 7 

Murphy, John 51 7 

Nelson, Carl Oscar 36 7 

Neunian, David 52 7 

Nicholson, Albin 26 7 

Nilsen, Joiin 49 7 

Nilsson, Edward 38 7 

NisMl, Clcincn> 29 7 

Odello. Victor 29 V 

Olsen, John .Andreas 43 7 

Olsen, Lars 2? 7 

Olsen, Samuel 23 7 

Olssen, Andrew 23 7 

Olsson, Hans 3 7 

Olsson, John Oscar 47 7 

Paaso, Andrew 16 7 

Padligur, Ewald 27 7 

Paulin. Abel 16 7 

Perales, Francisco 1 / 

Peterson, John 13 7 

Petterson, P. .Axel 31 7 

Pfautsch, Carl Albert 17 7 

Poulsen, Oscar Emil 31 / 

Rielly, James W 22 7 

Rojeis, Andrew 25 7 

Saari, Oscar 44 7 

Saarinen, Gustav F 12 / 

Sandowal, Edwardo 47 / 

Sayle, Wm 42 7 

Schaab, Anton F. J H 7 

Schmidt, lamest Rudolf 17 7 

Sederholni. Anton 40 7 

Sedgewick. Charles 1-^ 7 

Sicbert. iM'ank Herman 52 7 

Sitnonsen, Christ C -'^ 7 

Simpson. J 16 7 

StefTensen. Soren 8 7 

Stringer, Ernest 1^ "7 

Suomela, Matti 42 7 

Svensson, Gustaf -A 47 7 

Takin, Otto 43 7 

Tapper, .Axel Edwin 33 7 



''■'"e No. Page 

\'an Koppel, Johannes 9 7 

\'inx. Heinrich T ig 7 

Wallace, George 23 7 

Walsh, William 40 7 

\N'ege, Wilhelm 17 7 

Wilen, Armas T 17 7 

Wilson, Andrew 27 7 

Winje. Hilmar 33 7 

Wirtanen. Jon 32 7 

Wise. Wm 24 7 

Wyers, John 21 7 

Salt Produced In 1918 3 10 

SaKage Claims 33 1 1 

San Francisco — 

New\s Writers Organize 2 2 

Longshoremen'.s Strike, The * 3-6; 16-7 

Sailors' Home, The * 6 7 

Scholarship Plan Given Up * 8 6 

San Francisco, Future of 9 6 

Fickert, District Attorney, Defeat 

of * 10 7 

Rolph, Mayor, Re-elected * 10 7 

$1000 Donation to Steel Strikers 15 7 

Six Ships Launched in Day at Moore 

Yard 16 5 

San Francisco's War Memorial 34 11 

San Francisco Sailors' Home * 36 6 

San Francisco's Harbor * 41 7 

Seafarers' Council, The * (of .San 

Francisco) 33 6 

Seamen's .\ct — .See International Sea- 
men's Union of America; also Court 
Decisions. 

Seamen (Merchant) Nationalitv Census 

of * ■ 1 6 

.'seamen's (Alien) Income Tax 1 2 

"Seamen's Contract. The" (by Walter 

Macarthur) 14 6 

Seamen's Wages (Holland) 1 2 

Seamen vs. Longshoremen * 3 6 

-Seamen's Troubles, As Others See It. 30 11 

Shark Had the Papers, The 37 11 

Shark, LUilizing the 34 2 

Shi]) Ahoy, Captain Kidd! 6 11 

.Shipbuilding in h'inland 49 6 

-Shipbuilding in Cierniany 36 11 

Shipbuilding in Spain 1 2 

-Shipbuilding on the Clyde * 50 6 

Shipping Commissioners Duties 10 2 

Shipping in Denmark 34 2 

Ship's "Husband," The 49 2 

Siberia, Rivers of 13 11 

Siberia, U. S. Policy in 21 10 

Sounding Device. A New * 4 6 

South African Trade Ll^nionism 15 3 

South Africa, News from 15 9 

"Soviet." A California * (State Univer- 
sity) 27 6 

Spain, Shipbuilding in 1 2 

Spanish Merchant Marine. The 44 2 

Speech, Freedom of 26 10 

Jspitzbergcn (jiven to IVorway 32 9 

bponge Fishing in Near East 49 

Statistics, Undesirable * (bv CK,>,-.. M. 

Kelley) 29 9 

Steam-schooner Forecastles * 42 / 

Steel Strike. The 6-1; 12-7; 14-2 

Steel Strike Called OfT * !<) 7 

Steel Strike, Lesson of the * 14-6; 29-9; 30-2 

Steel Strike. I'"inancial Statement of.... 31 2 

Strikes and Land Values 38 11 

Strikes at the Pyramids 26 7 

Strikes, Efforts to Outlaw — see ".Arbi- 
tration." 

Strikes in V. -S. During 1919 52 8 

".Successful" T^awycrs 37 2 

Sympathy for Labor (by W. I'.. Rubin) 6 9 



Taxation, Single Tax, Etc.— 

.Alien Seamen's Income Tax 1 2 

Tax-Free Islands 12 11 

I';xcessi\e Prolits Escape Tax 31 3 

Tax Shirk, The 37 II 

Truths Told by Henry George 38 9 

Three-Watch .System. The * 40 6 

Timber. Oregon's Standing 1 9 

Tips in Many Forms 40 2 

Trade Unionism in South .Africa 15 3 

Trade-Union. Schwab's Ideal 1 9 

Trade-Union, Structure of the 26-1; 27-1 

Trade-Unionism Among Seamen 27 1 

Training Ship Again. The * 40 7 

Transatlantic Liners 23 9 

Transatlantic Liners. Early 3.i 9 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME THIRTY-THREE 



Title 



Xo. Page 



Tril)iite to Merchant Seamen's War 

Record * 1 6 

Trouble, How To Start Tt In a Union *. 13 7 

Turtle Bests A Bear 6 9 



U 



Uncle Sam's ex-German Ships * 

Uncle Sam Noted Slow-Pay 

Uncle Sam's Post Office 

Unemployment in England 

Union Label, The 

Unions Xot Trusts 

Union vs. Non-Union Shop * 

Universal Military Training 

Useful Sea Snail, A 

U. S.-Built Wood Ships 

U. S. Enlisted Men, Names of 

U. S. Food Prices Jump 

U. S. Navy Governs Guam, The 

U. S. Leads in Deaths 

U. S. Railroads Returned to Private 

Ownership 

U. S. Senate Rejects Treaty * 

U. S. Sliipping Commissioners' Powers 

Invaded 42 8 



41 


6 


3S 


2 


7 


8 


34 


10 


1 


2 


5 


3 


16 


6 


27 


11 


5 


2 


29 


7 


24 


2 


47 


3 


45 


10 


52 


3 


27 


7 


29 


7 



United States Shipping Board — 

Shipping Facts - 

Selling "Lame Ducks" 2 

Shipping Board's Policy (by Chair- 
man Payne) 21 

Shipping Board's New Chief, W. S. 
Benson 31 



9 
11 



Title 



No. Page 



Old Ideas Die Hard * (Skippers' 

Wives Aboard Ship) 46 6 

Step in Right Direction. A *" 49 6 

U. S. Shipping, Growth of 49 6 

U. S. Steamboat Inspection 24 7 



W 



Wages and Babies * 21 6 

Wall. F. R. (A Posthumous Memoir) . .6-2: 12-9 

W'all Street Crimes 4 2 

War Debts 2 11 

War Losses, The World's 14 H 

\\'ashington Letter, Our (by Laurence 

Todd). See is.sues 1 to 52 

Wireless Pilot, A 48 11 

Wooden Steamers Don't Pay * 48 

Wood Lighter Than Cork, A 47 

Workers' Funds and Bankers .^4 

Workmen's Compensation (bv \\'ill T. 

French) ^ 

Workers' Unrest. The (by W. B. Rubin) 5 
What Does Labor Want? (by W. A. 

.'\ppleton) 22 

Why Be a Saphead? 50 

Wrecks — 

Admiral Evans 31 

Admiral Sims 15 5 

Antilles ^i 14 

Belvedere 6 5 

Benvola 12 14 

Brisk -^4 14 

Casco 5 .■> 



Title 



No. Pnge 



Charles E. Moody 46 5 

China 2?i 5 

Corydon 4 14 

Cubadist (Posted "Missing") 35 11 

Defender 38 5 

De Kalh ?>2 14 

Firwood 17 5 

Geo. N. Orr 27 14 

Girlie Mahony 17-5. 7 

H-1, U. S. Submarine 29-5; 32-5 

Henry W. Cramp 12 14 

Irmgard 42 3 

J. A. Chanslor 16-5: 18-5; 20-7; 21-5: 30-5 

Jacoris Conde 47 5 

Joseph Leopold 41 9 

Lake Frampton 48-14; 49-14 

Lake Stobi 44 5 

Lolinc 1 14 

Macona 29 15 

Manxman 19 15 

Marne 25 2 

Milmorine 19 14 

Mount Hood 9 14 

Heflfron 1 14 

North Fork 4 5 

Princess Sophia 1 5 

Retriever 32 5 

Samuel Faunce (Posted "Missing").. 35 14 

.Solovoei 31 15 

South Coast 16 5 

Talus 24 14 

Unimak 1 5 

Windrush 41 9 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXIII, No. 1. 



SAN FRANCI.SCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1919. 



Whole No. 2555. 



LABOR— THE NEW POWER 



The Demand for a Voice in the Management of Industry 



What was radical yesterday is sane and 
wise to-day. The world changes and we 
change with it. And, so, as to the new 
demands of Labor, those that are right 
are as sure to come as day follows night 
and night follows day. In the end jus- 
tice and humanity will prevail. The fight 
has been long and hard, often tremen- 
dously discouraging, but little by little 
ground has been won, until now the basis 
is too solid ever to be shaken; Labor's 
day has come and greater triumphs are 
assured. 

These thoughts have been enlarged upon 
by Matthew Woll, recently elected a vice- 
president of the American Federation of 
Labor, and being of exceptional merit, 
are printed herewith in full. 



The worker was for centuries a slave, having 
no rights except as he shared with other 
domestic animals. Then he was for centuries 
a serf, in some measure free, but bound to his 
feudal lord and indissolubly attached to the 
soil. He then became a wage earner with 
enlarged independence, but without a voice 
in the nation. Out of this he presently emerged 
and to-day, raised from a condition of depend- 
ence into independence, he is impelled by new 
ideas and new opportunities. The old order of 
things is fast being destroyed. It is only a 
question of time, and organization, when we 
must come into the new order of things. New 
systems are crystallizing all about us, and we 
feel the shock of force against force in both the 
political and economic world. 

For more centuries than man can count we 
have been led to believe that might was right. 
We have been told of how the greater has 
preyed upon the lesser; the greater bird upon 
the smaller. The rat ate the malt; the cat 
ate the rat; the dog worried the cat; and the 
cow with the crumpled horn tossed the dog; 
the cow herself in her turn being milked. It 
has been said that the law of life is death; 
the law of right is force. 

The world is solving the question which is 
the stronger force. Every man, whether is 
head money or labor to sell, was said to have 
the right to make the best bargain for him- 
self in his power. Under this standard there 
could be no more immorality in labor's most 
extravagant demand than in employers' de- 



mands, no matter how excessive By this 
rule the only governing factor was the ability 
to take and hold a strong position. The 
weaker must go. 

Wlijcn labor began to organize itself, it 
began to recognize its own strength. There- 
after it began to find a way out of the trap 
into which it was tricked and held by brute 
force. The labor question was for years 
purely a question of physical force. It was 
a servile revolt at first in which one side at 
least was not accorded combatant's rights. 

The ethics of the labor question have since 
changed. In spite of the declamers parading 
as martyrs to the cause of labor, the intelli- 
gent and loyal trades unionists will agree 
that employers liave rights and purposes which 
are to be protected by society, if industry 
is to go on at all. Likewise, in spite of 
equal fatuous demigods of capital, labor must 
organize and ameliorate conditions from within, 
and all good people should give aid and 
comfort to the worker in this task. 

One set of thinkers tell us' that the goal to 
which the workers' movement is tending is 
communism and anarchy, two utterly irre- 
concilable conditions. Another set of declaimers 
tell us that capital inevitably tends to monopoly, 
and that America is fast becoming a plutocracy 
pure and simple. If the truth is to be found, 
it is between these two errors. There is a 
tendency toward communism on one side, 
and a tendency toward anarchy on the other, 
which must come sooner or later to a staple 
compromise, for compromise is the ultimate 
law of nature. 

Tlie line along which employers and em- 
[jloyees touch is the wage system. It has 
been generally asserted that labor is entitled 
to a fair share in the combined product of work 
and capital, which is to be ascertained by the 
real or artificial scarcity of workers, the real 
or artificial scarcity of capital, the real or 
artificial scarcity of the commodity prepared. 
As long as the labor was an inconsistent, loose 
aggregation of confused units, it did not make 
much (lifiference whether there was an error 
in the talculation or not. as the error was put 
not on the side of those making the calcula- 
tion With labor organized, vigilant and power- 
ful, the easy, old-fashioned way of calculation 
is fast becoming a relic of olden times. 

The system by which labor is to be recom- 
pensed must be changed. Many makeshifts 
have been suggested by men who have seen 
the necessity of making employers and em- 



ployees come to some sort of modus operandi 
if progress is to continue. A new method 
must be applied, based upon justice to both 
sides. Only in that way will we attack the 
core of the labor question, if the cause of the 
original irritation is disposed of, we may 
come to the time when permanent peace may 
be declared and guaranteed. To do this, we 
must admit that employers have rights in 
their investments and in the service they 
pcrfonn without which the whole superstruc- 
ture must tumble to ruin, and employers 
must allow that labor is an intelligent ele- 
ment, and a human force with rights certainly 
as dear, if not more precious, as its own. 
Employer and employe must no longer stand 
apart. Pride, caste, greed, hatred and bitter- 
ness must be removed. Employer and employees 
must meet, discuss and agree upon every 
detail in the management of the concern they 
represent. 

Workers to-day are looking forward to some- 
thing better than a mere avoidance of unem- 
ployment and strikes. They have become 
tired of war in the industrial field, Tlicy 
are no longer inclined to quietly submit to 
an autocratic government of the conditions of 
their own life. They will no longer accept 
"Prussianism" even in the dock, the factory, 
the mine. At the present moment organ- 
ized labor is planning to demand that busi- 
ness enterprises be placed on a new footing 
bv admitting the workmen to some participa- 
tion, not in profits, but in control and manage- 
ment. Thev are not asking that the workmen 
be admitted to any share of what is essen- 
tially the employer's own business — that is. 
those matters which do not concern the 
employee directly in the industry or cmnloy- 
nient in which he may he engaged. They 
do believe and feel, however, that thev should 
have a voice — even to an equal voice, with 
the management itself— in the daily control 
of the employment in which they spend their 
working lives, in the atmosphere and under 
the conditions in which they have to work, 
in the hours of beginning and ending work, 
in tiip conditions of rcnnineration and in the 
manner of conducting business generally. In 
other words the workmen have come to realize 
that industrial peace between nations— cannot 
be had except on the lines of industrial as well 
as political democracy. 

The power of the king has passed. The 
I)o\ver of wealth is passing, the new power 
dawning upon this world is that of the work- 
ing man to rule his own destiny. It is the 
trade union movement which has placed this 
power into his hands, and it is through this 
institution that his power can no longer be 
denied him. 



nrwwwvmniDnni 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



ALIEN SEAMEN'S INCOME TAX. 



rhc [oUovviiii; self-explanatory circular 
rclating to the income tax payable by alien 
seamen has just been issued: 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT 
Office of Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue, Washington, D. C. 
To Collectors of Internal Revenue and 
Others Concerned : 

The final edition of Regulations 45 is 
amended by inserting immediately after 
Article 92 a paragraph to be known as Ar- 
ticle 92a as follows: 

ART. 92a. When the wages of a non- 
resident alien seaman are derived from 
sources within the United States. While 
resident alien seamen are taxable like citi- 
zens on their entire income from whatever 
sources derived, nonresident alien seamen 
are taxable only on income from sources 
within the United States. Ordinarily, 
wages received for services rendered inside 
the territorial United States are to be re- 
garded as from sources within the United 
States. The wages of an alien seaman 
earned on a coastwise vessel are from 
sources within the United States, but wages 
earned by an alien seaman on a ship regu- 
larly engaged in foreign trade are not to 
be regarded as from sources within the 
United States, even though the ship flics 
the American flag, or although during a 
part of the time the ship touched at United 
States ports and remained there a reason- 
able time for the transaction of its busi- 
ness. The presence of a seaman aboard a 
ship which enters a port for such purposes 
of foreign trade is merely transitory and 
wages earned during that period by a non- 
resident alien seaman are not taxable. 
There is no withholding from the wages 
of alien seamen unless they are nonresi- 
dents within the rules laid down in Arti- 
cles 311 to 315. Even in the case of a 
nonresident alien seaman, the employer is 
not obliged to withhold from wages unless 
those wages are from sources within the 
United States as defined above. As to 
when alien seamen are to be regarded as 
residents see Art. 312a. 

The final edition of Regulations 45 is 
amended by inserting immediately after 
Article 312, a paragraph to be known as 
Article 312a as follows: 

.VRT. 312a. Alien Seamen, When to be 
regarded as residents. In order to deter- 
mine whether an alien seaman is a resident 
within the meaning of the income tax law, 
it is necessary to decide whether the pre- 
sumption of nonresidence is overcome by 
facts showing that he has established a 
residence in the territorial United States, 
which consists of the States, the District 
of Columbia, and the Territories of Hawaii 
and Alaska, and excludes other places. 
Residence may be established on a vessel 
regularly engaged in coastwise trade, but 
the mere fact that a sailor makes his home 
on a vessel flying the United States flag 
and engaged in foreign trade is not suffi- 
cient to establish residence in the United 
States, even though the vessel, while carry- 
ing on foreign trad^ touches at American 
ports. An alien seaman may require an 
actual residence in the territorial United 
States, within the rules laid down in Ar- 
ticle 312 although the nature of his calling 
requires him to be absent from the place 
where his residence is established for a 



juni; inriod. An alien seaman may acquire 
siKJi a residence at a sailor's boarding 
house or hotel, but such a claim should be 
carefully scrutinized in order to make sure 
that such residence is bona fide. The filing 
of Form 1078 (Revised), or taking out first 
citizenship papers, is proof of residence in 
the United States from the time the form 
is filed or the papers taken out, unless re- 
butted by other e\-idence showing an inten- 
tion to be a transient. The fact that a head 
tax has been paid on behalf of an alien 
seaman entering the United States is no 
evidence that he has acquired residence, be- 
cause the head tax is payable unless the 
alien who is entering the country is merely 
in transit through the country. An alien 
may remain a nonresident although he is 
not in transit through the country. As to 
when the wages of alien seamen are subject 
to tax, see Article 92a. 

Daniel C. Roper, 
Commissioner of Internal Revenue. 
A])])rovcd : June 20, 1919. 

J. H. Moyle, 

Acting Secretary of the Treasury. 



THE UNION LABEL. 



One of the big things developed by the 
war as a stabilizer of industrial conditions 
was the need for a more extended adoption 
of the principle of collective bargaining. 

The War Labor Hoard which was created 
by proclamation of the President, for the 
purpose of adjusting disputes in war indus- 
tries, declared as its first principle "the right 
of workers to organize in trade unions and 
to bargain collectively through chosen rep- 
resentatives is recognized and affirmed. This 
right shall not be denied, abridged, or inter- 
fered with by the employers in any manner 
whatsoever.'' 

The use of a union label, shop card or 
working button to designate the j^roduct of 
trade unionists or their employment in an 
establishment is predicated upon a trade 
agreement, carrying with it the collective 
bargaining princii)le. with all that this im- 
plies. 

When an appeal is made to give preference 
to the purchase of commodities bearing the 
union label or a shop where a card is dis- 
played or a button worn to distinguish mem- 
bership in a trade union, it is a request to 
recognize a fundamental principle of the 
trade union movement, the trade agreement. 

lender the trade agreement the workers 
have a full and equal opportunity to regulate 
their hours of laVjor and wage scale, as ex- 
cept this measure of justice is accorded 
them, there can be no union label, shop card 
or button agreement with any employer. 

Justice and equity are therefore guaran- 
teed to those who use their purchasing power 
in favor of the trade agreement, as exempli- 
fied by the L'nion Label, shop card or work- 
ing button, as well as high class workman- 
ship and humane treatment, and in addition 
to this is the satisfaction of knowing that a 
consistent demand for labeled goods strength- 
ens the trade agreement iirincijile as well as 
the l'nion Label. 



SHIPBUILDING IN SPAIN. 



outside their own country — the .Sociedad 
l'".spanola de C'onstruccion Naval, with es- 
tablishments at Cartagena, Ferrol, Cadiz, 
and Bilbao, and the Compania Euskalduna 
at Bilbao. The latter was, and still is, a 
purely Spanish concern, but the Sociedad 
Espanola was originally organized and oper- 
ated by British capitalists in co-operation 
with the Spanish Government, and was in- 
tended for the construction of a new Spanish 
navy. It was found that, in order to be 
successful, the firm would have to undertake 
mercantile as well as naval work, and during 
the war very little beyond mercantile work 
has been done. Elsewhere in Spain many 
new }ards have sprung up, and some of 
those which existed previously have been so 
much extended and reorganized as to be 
practically new. Now it is announced that 
the requirements of the Spanish mercantile 
marine demand a tonnage of 1,500,000, 
which is more than double that owned at 
present in the country ; and that, in order to 
obtain this tonnage within five years, it will 
be necessary to turn out annually at least 
as much as there is under construction at 
present in Spanish shipyards — about 150,000 
tons. So it is proposed that the protective 
measures of the law of 1909 should be in- 
creased, and that everything possible should 
be done to stimulate production and to re- 
serve for home shipyards all the work of 
doubling the Spanish merchant fleets. One 
suggestion is that there should be navigation 
subsidies for hulls of Spanish construction, 
with additional subsidies for firms who also 
produce boilers and machinery. 



DUTCH SEAMEN'S WAGES. 



Shipbuilding in Spain has during the war 
made very great progress, which is likely lo 
continue in the future. Before the war there 
were reallv onlv two concerns well known 



By nnitual agreement between the Dutch 
shipowners and the Seamen's Union, the fol- 
lowing scale of monthly wages has been fixed 
for Dutch vessels: Petty officers, 130 guilders 
$52.26); A. B.'s, 115 g. ($46.13); firemen, 
120 g. ($48.24) ; ordinary seamen, 65 g. 
($26.13); boys, 30 g. ($12.06), and cooks, 
130 g. ($52.26). These wages represent an 
increase of about 150 per cent on the pre- 
war rates. As regards the working hours, 
the following have been fixed : .\t home and 
foreign ports the eight-hour day will be in- 
troduced for the deck and engine-room 
staff's; the free Saturday afternoon will be 
allowed at sea and at any port, with the ex- 
ception that any work in connection with the 
.safety of vessel and cargo must be done. 
As to the sailors' demand to immediately 
introduce the eight-hour working day at sea, 
no decision has been arrived at. The owners 
have consented to definitely instruct their 
captains to strictly limit Sunday and Satur- 
day afternoon work to cases of absolute ne- 
cessity for saving vessel and cargo. Over- 
time has been fixed as follows : Ordinary 
seamen 16 cents (U. S.), and other mem- 
bers of the crew 28 cents (U. S.) per hour. 
For Sunday work, for ordinary seamen 24 
cents (U. S.), and the others 1 guilder (40.2 
cents) per hour. Extra money will be paid 
for assistance rendered during the loading 
or discharging of cargo at any port, or for 
shifting coal from holds to bunkers when at 
sea. After one and a half years' continuous 
service sailors are entitled to six months' 
notice before leaving. If the home voyage 
is not by a Dutch steamer sailors may claim 
free passage and payment of wages until 
arrival in Holland. 



Demand the union label. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



"Up-to-Date" Paint Has Deadly Effect. 

Under old conditions, a painter could 
work for 30 years and keep in fair condi- 
tion, but now the limit is 10 or 12 years 
because of modern paints, say ofiflcers of 
the Painters' Union. 

"The old-fashioned way of making paint 
was with oil and zinc. Then white lead 
was introduced. That dough becomes poi- 
sonous. But the lead is not the only thing. 
The chemists have invaded the factory and 
brought in a hundred substitutes designed 
to quick covering and drying. 

"Five minutes in a room where painters 
work would be long enough to convince 
the average man of the poisonous nature 
of these mixtures. No matter how much 
ventilation he can get, it is imi>ossible for 
a painter to stay more than an hour in a 
])lace filled with such deadly fumes. The 
one puri)ose of the manufacturers is to 
produce a ])aint that will give quick re- 
sults. Sometimes they can get the appear- 
ance of two coats with one. Of course, it 
does not last so well, but that makes no 
difference. 

"Fieauty of color and permanence were 
the qualities formerly demanded in pamt. 
Now everything is sacrificed to speed and 
l)resent effect. If the painters could choose 
between the five-day week under present 
conditions and six days with less injurious 
liaint, they would take the old conditions. 

"Dr. Harris, the occupational disease ex- 
])ert, examined hundreds of ])ainters for 
months. He reported that a large percent- 
age of them were diseased as a result of 
their work. With the assistance of the 
health department, the brotherhood carried 
on an educational campaign. We tried to 
teach the boys to handle these materials 
with less injury to their health. Even with 
this, the toll of those hurt by lead poison- 
ing and other ailments is enormous." 



R. R. Owners Warned. 

The Philadel])hia North American sounds 
an editorial warning to railroad owners 
that they must solve the question of 
watered stock and cease attempting to 
protect these fictitious values. The news- 
paper assures its readers that it does not 
favor Government ownership, but that "it 
requires no gift of prophecy to foresee that 
unless the railroad interests can suggest 
some new ])lan. Government ownership 
would appear to be inevitable." 

The editor acknowledges that the rail- 
roads' "weakest line of defense" is their 
attempt to hold watered stock and force 
the people to pay dividends on. these val- 
ues. This, declares the North American, 
is the railroad workers' "heaviest weapon 
of attack" in their advocacy of the I'lumb 
plan. 



'Won't "Fire" P. O. Head. 

A Washington newspajjcr ])redicts that 

Postmaster-General Burleson will not be. 

"fired" despite protests by organized labor, 

which, it is stated, "never misses an oppor- 

_ tunity to swing on the Postmaster-Gen- 

■ eral." 

■ "Burleson," continues this ])a])cr, "is 

L 



their best argument against Government 
ownership or operation of public utilities 
without labor being granted a protective 
voice and vote in management. 

"jNIr. Burleson is grieved and hurt by the 
attitude of labor and of the men in his 
party who every now and then rise up and 
demand his sacrifice. They don't under- 
stand him. He is not antagonistic to labor. 
He simply believes in keeping the work- 
ingman in his place. 

"And Albert Sidnev knows the place." 



Draft Shows Illiteracy. 

In a rci)ort made public by the North 
Carolina State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction statistics gathered from draft 
registrants show an appalling degree of 
illiteracy in North Carolina. It is shown 
that more than 1000 men between the ages 
of 21 and 31 reside in Guilford county who 
are unable to write their names. No dis- 
tinction is made between white and colored 
residents, and it is impossible to determine 
racial ])ercentages of illiteracy. 

While North Carolinans have known 
that illiteracy prevails in the mountain 
section of the State they did not expect 
this condition to exist in Guilford county, 
which is one of the wealthiest counties in 
the State, and which prides itself on its 
schools. 



Untangling O. B. U. Mess. 

Officers of the United Mine Workers 
of America are untangling a mess that 
members of this union in district No. 18, 
Canada, got into when they joined the 
one-big-union aggregation of new world 
makers. 

The miners suspended work, but they 
woke up when red-hot speeches proved a 
poor substitute for strike benefits. Then 
they notified the Government that they 
would return to work under the old agree- 
ment. The Government declined unless the 
international union of the United Mine 
^\'orkers guaranteed that the contract 
would be observed. The United Mine 
Workers' officials refused to guarantee 
anything in connection with a dual organi- 
zation and they are now endeavoring, with 
the assistance of loyal trade union miners, 
to end the ghost dancing in that district. 



Drunk on Power. 

While Irvin S. Cobb is best known as a 
humorist, there was nothing funny in his 
address to striking actors in New York. 

"I came here as an American who be- 
lieves in justice," he said, "to congratulate 
you on your wonderful fight. When a man 
refuses to arbitrate it shows he is in the 
wrong. Men don't get drunk on rum alone, 
but on power as well, and to-day the 
managers are drunk on ])ower." 

Frank Gillmore, secretary of the Actors' 
Ec|uity Association, said: 

"If the managers' interest in the theater 
had been as sincere as they claim they 
would not have helped to degrade it to the 
condition against w'hich not only the ])ress 
but a long-suffering and indulgent jiublic 
(Continued on Pagrc 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia, 
29 Ei-skine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Oiifiice, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 
Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

Xational Sailors and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer, 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev Wedels 
plads 5, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundt, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten IB., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
liavn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
heiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina IS, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL. 
Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritime des Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Worker* 



AH private trade and the distribu- 
tion of commodities in the city of 
Samara. Russia, have been centered 
in the Co-operative Consumers' So- 
ciety "Samopomostch" (Self-helf), 
which now owns 128 stores. 

At the recent annual congress of 
llie Women's Co-operative Guild, 
held at Middlesborough, England, it 
was announced that the Guild had 
increased in the last twelve months 
by 100 new branches and 5,000 odd 
new members. 

Employers and the public press in 
Australia are worlsing overtime to 
convince the public that trade union- 
ists are responsible for increased 
prices. Bread has been advanced one 
cent a loaf since the bakery drivcis 
raised wages $1.48 a week and the 
Labor Call says: "The carter can 
deliver 1100 loaves of bread a week 
and the increase of one cent on that 
num])er amounts to $11.10, while the 
carter's wages were raised $1.48. Thus 
the public is penalized to the extent 
of $9.62 a week to cover the cost 
of $1.48 a week." 

Fear that the immediate and com.- 
plete socialization of German indus- 
try would lead to civil war, such 
as Russia has experienced, was ex- 
pressed in the debate on socializa- 
tion at the trade union congress held 
in Nuremburg. In seeking to de 
mocratize production the congress 
adopted a resolution demanding tliat 
in all establishments employing 
twenty or more workers, workmen's 
councils, freely chosen, shall be 
elected to meet with the represent- 
atives of the employers and work 
out a system of production in con- 
formity with "democratic principles." 
This plan is much the same as the 
one proposed by the government. 

The proclamations of General 
Plumcr at Cologne in reference to 
threatened strikes in the British 
occupied zone along the Rhine 
should be carefully noted: "In ac- 
cordance with the law all dispute- 
and differences are to be brought 
for settlement before the existing 
German courts of arbitration. In 
the event of a settlement not being 
reached by these means, the case 
will be brought before the British 
military authorities, who, after hear- 
ing both sides with sympathy and 
impartially, will make a decision 
which will be binding for both par- 
ties. I warn all that severe measures 
will be taken against any person 
who, in defiance of this proclama- 
tion, acts in any way contrary to 
these orders or subversive of their 
intention." 

In Madras, there are now the 
Textile Workers' Union. Tramway- 
men's Union, Rickshawalla's Union, 
Printers' Union and Railway Work- 
shop Union. Speaking at a meeting 
in London on July 26, Mr. B. P. 
Wadia, president of Madras Labor 
Union, said that the workers of 
Indian Textile factories were paid 
$5 a month for a week of seventy 
two hours. During their twelve- 
hour day they were allowed thirty 
minutes for a meal, but it took so 
long to file out of the factory, and 
back again, that as a mat'ter of fact 
each man had only about twelve or 
thirteen minutes in which to swallo\\ 
his food. This was India under the 
reformed factory legislation of 1911'. 
Previously the men had worked a 
fourteen, sixteen, and seventeen and 
onc-half-hour day. 



M. BROWN &i SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

52914 BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO. CAL. 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navlqatlon, San Pedro, situated In 
the sunny south, is the ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Nav- 
igation School here and under his undivided personal supervision students 
will be thoroughly prepared to pass successfully before the United States 
Steamboat Inspectors. 

TERIVIS ARE REASONABLE 



Attention, Look! 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 
SUITS and UNIFORMS 

made to order by expert tailors and designers. Best selection 
of imported and domestic woolens. 

Also ready-made Suits, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Trunks, Suit- 
Cases, Sailors' Canvas Bags, Oilskin Clothes, Rubber Boots, 
Bedding, Blankets and Toilet Articles. 

Slopchest Outfits, Wholesale. 



I! Free information 
of the movements 
of all vessels under 
every flag. 



=•-^5^^ 



A visit to this store will convi nce you 

CAPTAINCHAS-TSWANSON 

36 Steuart Street, near Market 

In the Soulbem Pacific Building 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Douglas 1082 



Free use of read- 
ing, writing and 
rest room on the 
mezzanine floor. 



Macarthur's 

NAVIGATION LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES 

CAPT. CUGLE'S BOOK, SIMPLE RULES IN NAVI- 
GATION. THE BLUE BOOK OF FACTS, A HAND- 
BOOK FOR THE MARINE ENGINEER. 

Nautical Instruments 

CAPTAINS' LEATHER CARRYING-CASES FOR SHIP'S 
PAPERS. NAUTICAL ADVICE TO ALL 
PARTS OF THE GLOBE. 

Twelve years ago the smallest, to-day the largest, best 

equipped and cleanest exclusive seafaring men's 

store in the world. 



S. G. SWANSON 

Establlslied iy04 
For the BEST there is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE — S. G. Swanson Is not connected 
with any dye works and has no BoUcltors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2a Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

A SQUARE MEAL 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D 8ts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSKN. Prop. 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING. SHOKS. H.\TS. RUBBER 

AND OIL CLOTHINa 

207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 




DO YOU KNOW 

That War-Savings Stamps 
pay 4 per cent, compound in- 
terest? 

That W. S. S. cost $4.12 in 
January and one cent more 
each succeeding month of the 
year, reaching their highest 
price, $4.23, in December? 

That the 1919 W. S. S., 
known as the Franklin Issue, 
will be redeemed by the Gov- 
ernment on January 1, 1924, 
for five dollars? 

That the 1918 W. S. S. will 
be redeemed by the Govern- 
ment on January 1, 1923, for 
five dollars? 

That W. S. S. of either issue,' 
if necessary, mSy be redeemed 
for value to date, as indicated 
on the W. S. S. Certificate, at 
any post office upon ten days' 
notice? 

That one thousand dollars* 
worth of W. S. S. is the maxi- 
mum amount allowed to smy 
one purchaser? 

That Thrift Stamps cost 
twenty-five cents? And that 
sixteen Thrift Stamps are ex- 
changeable for 2m interest-bear- 
ing War-Savings Stamp? 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the whereahouti 
of L. C. S. Admiraal, a member of 
the Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Asso- 
ciation, last heard of in Rotterdam, 
Holland, 1914, will please notify his 
brother J. J. Admiraal, 51 South 
Street, New York, N. Y. 8-13-19 



Information wanted regarding John 
Tohnsen, native of Bergen, age 44, 
last heard from in New Orleans, 
1917, was then on schooner "Lizzie 
M. Parson," going to France. Any 
information will be appreciated by 
his brother, Andrew Johnsen, Sail- 
ors' Union, Seattle, Wash. 8-20-19 



Will Ingwald Johnson, Charles 
Moller, and any other member of 
the crew of the S. S. "Chehalis," on 
January 29, 1919, when Otto Peter- 
son was injured, kindly report to the 
Secretary, Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, San Francisco, Cal. 8-13-19 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The dredge "Oregon" has completed the ap- 
proach for vessels at the Governm«nt dock at 
Empire, Coos Bay, Ore., and is now excavating 
about the Oregon Pacific bridge near North 
Bend. 

The Alaska salmon fleet is returning with 
very discouraging reports. The annual catch 
is considerably below the normal, in some in- 
stances less than 25 per cent, of the usual sea- 
son's pack. 

The treaty between the United States, Great 
Britain and Canada for the protection of sock- 
eyed salmon fisheries on the Fraser river and 
contiguous waters in British Columbia and the 
State of Washington has been signed at the 
State Department. 

The schooner "Annie E.," which arrived at 
Honolulu in distress three weeks ago on her 
way from Suva to San Francisco, has abandoned 
her trip to the Coast and her small cargo of 
copra has been unloaded. She made an attempt 
to get to the mainland last week, but was com- 
pelled to put back into port on account of leaks. 
The wood auxiliary motor vessels "Belata," 
"Bundarra," "Berthanga," "Birriwa," and "Bur- 
ringa," wood steamers of 2,800 tons gross, 
2,300 net, dimensions 268 ft. by 47.1 ft. by 27 ft., 
built by the Patterson-MacDonald Ship Building 
Co., Seattle, Wash., in 1918, and owned by the 
Australian Government, are reported sold to 
American buyers representing London interests. 
That .Seattle's public terminals are maintain- 
ing their earning power and continue on a pay- 
ing basis was again demonstrated when the Port 
Commission decided there would be no need of 
a tax levy on the district for the operation of 
the properties during 1920. Last year no levy 
was made for the first time since the organiza- 
tion of the port district, returns from the opera- 
tion of the terminals demonstrating that the 
properties were on a paying basis. 

Reported to be overdue more than 100 days, 
the American auxiliary schooner "Gilbert Is- 
land" is now given up as lost. The vessel, 
which is owned by the commander. Captain 
George Robinson, and others of Sydney, sailed 
from San Francisco for Australia on February 
IS, and has not been reported since. Burns, 
Philip & Co. are the agents for the vessel here. 
Eighty days is a normal passage for this ves- 
sel to Sydney. Robinson was delayed on the 
passage to San Francisco, the voyage taking 
120 days. 

The Canadian Pacific railroad has been de- 
feated in its effort to stop the Workmen's Com- 
pensation Board paying benefits arising out of 
the foundering of the steamer "Princess Sophia" 
in Alaskan waters last October. The railroad 
company owned the boat and when the board 
awarded benefits an injunction was secured 
against it, the railroad eompany holding that 
the vessel was in foreign waters and outside the 
jurisdiction of the board. The injunction is now 
set aside. 

E. C. Evans & Sons .will take over the steamer 
"Fort Logan" from the Shipping Board in the 
immediate future. The "Fort Logan" is a 
wooden vessel, built by Kruse & Banks of Coos 
Bay. The engines have been installed at Ala- 
meda by the Tibbetts yard. The vessel has been 
put in readiness and will be bunkered by the 
King Coal Company preliminary to going into 
the service. Evans & Sons w'ill dispatch the 
"Fort Logan" to the United Kingdom with a 
full cargo of barley. 

One of the three new marine railways at the 
Moore Shipbuilding Company's shipyard, Oak- 
land, the first to be completed, stood up under 
the test of hauling the 12,000-ton tanker "Imlay" 
from the Oakland estuary. The vessel was 
hauled from the water in 30 minutes without 
any difficulty. The "Imlay" is the first tanker 
completed at the shipyard for the United States 
Shipping Board and was put on the dock to be 
cleaned and painted before going on her trial 
trip. 

Two Pacific Coast lumber vessels have arrived 
safely at Australian ports, according to advices 
received by the marine department of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. The schooner 
"Edward R. West" reached Sydney September 
2, sixty-two days out from Port Blakeley with 
964414 feet of timber, and the barkentine 
Charles F. Crocker." from Eureka, arrived at 
Newcastle on September 3 with 791,80.S feet of 
California redwood. Both cargoes of lumber 
were shipped by Comyn, Mackall & Co. 

The steamer "Sierra" of the Oceanic Line, 
which was commandeered at the beginning of 
this country's participation in the war, is to 
be released to the owners this week, it was 
announced during the week. Fred S.' Samuels is 
now m New York, the ship has made the last 
trip across with returned troops and should be 
turned over immediately. The "Sierra" will 
be brought to this coast and reconditioned be- 
fore bemg restored to the former service to 
Sydney, Pago Pago and Honolulu. This, to- 
gether with the restoration of the Matson 
service, will give the islands all of the passen- 
ger ships that will be needed immediately. 



San Francisco probably will be selected as 
the operating base for the mine layers "Aroos- 
took" and "Baltimore" and the various units 
of the Pacific mine sweeping detachments, ac- 
cording to Captain J. Harvey Tomb, command- 
ing the "Aroostook." Captain Tomb said that 
the mine sweepers attached to the Pacific fleet 
probably will not arrive on this coast for sev- 
eral months as they are now engaged in sweep- 
ing and sinking by machine gunfire the 70,0CO 
mines that formed the famous North Sea mine 
barrage. 

That portion of the recently announced Pa- 
cific program of ' the United States Shipping 
Board which calls for the allocation of vessels 
to run between Puget Sound and South Amer- 
ican points by way of San Francisco and San 
Diego will not be put into effect unless justified 
by a decided increase in trade, according to 
Shipping Board officials at San Francisco. "The 
ships now plying between Pacific Coast and 
South American ports now are so numerous 
that the trade is well taken care of," it was 
announced. "There appears to be no necessity 
for putting our proposed South American pro- 
gram into effect. The operation of this pro- 
gram will depend entirely on trade conditions." 
The program called for the operation of four 
Siiipping Board vessels on this run. 

San Franciscans and the city's visitors will 
have an opportunity of inspecting the former 
German "U-88," a submarine, listed with six- 
teen sinkings. The former death dealer is 
now in San Pedro, in command of Lieutenant- 
Commander J. L. Nielson, San Francisco. Huge 
scars and dents along her sides, together with 
the sixteen iron crosses are grim reminders of 
the work of destruction performed by the 
underseas boat. She is 185 feet long, with a 
beam of 22 feet and weighs 800 tons. The 
vessel carries a crew of twenty men. After 
being held open for visitors here for several 
days, the submarine will be taken to the Union 
Iron Works and scrapped. Her engines will 
lie saved, however. 

Contradictory testimony was given in an in- 
vestigation begun before Captain John A. Bul- 
ger, supervising inspector of hulls and boilers, 
into the collision on August 30 ofif Duxbury 
Reef between the steamers "Helen P. Drew" 
and "Unimak." First Officer Hans L. Isaac- 
son of the "Unimak," which was capsized in 
the crash, testified that he was standing on 
the bridge and that Captain C. E. Jahnsen was 
below. He declared that the "Helen P. Drew" 
sounded no whistles. The night, he said, was 
clear. This testimony was contradicted by 
Captain Abaach of the "Helen P. Drew," who 
insisted he blew the proper whistles and com- 
plied in other ways with the navigation rules 
and regulations. The "Unimak," which was 
towed in by the "Helen P. Drew," is now under- 
going repairs. 

The Standard Oil Company has let a contract 
with the Union Construction Company of Oak- 
land for the construction of the first ship to be 
l)uilt for private parties in the San Francisco 
bay district since the beginning of the war, it 
was announced during the week. The keel of 
the new ship will be laid in a few weeks and 
the contract calls for the completion in about 
si.K months. The letting of this contract ushers 
in a new epoch of ship construction, as the 
vessel will he a motorship tanker with a ca- 
pacity of 15,000 barrels of oil. This will be 
the third motor-driven tanker built in this 
country, two others having been constructed 
on the Atlantic. As the initial ones have proved 
successful froin the standpoint of operation and 
economy, it is expected this is only the fore- 
runner of a big fleet of tankers and their craft 
that will be propelled by the internal combus- 
tion engine. 

Owing to the excessive costs of ship con- 
struction in Japan and the inability of the 
Mikado's builders to accept and turn out orders, 
the Japanese are now planning to come to San 
Francisco to have additional tonnage constructed, 
T. Hirota, managing director of the Ocean 
Transport Company of Kobe, announced dur- 
ing the week. Hirota, who was manager here 
for the Mitsui Company for six years prior to 
1914, arrived at San Francisco on the "Siberia 
Maru." Hirota's company is now operating 
a fleet of thirty freighters on the Pacific and 
to points on the Atlantic, and said that if the 
local shipbuilding plants demand only reason- 
able prices, he is prepared to let contracts for 
the building of several additional ships. The 
traffic of the Pacific, and in fact all the seas, 
demand additional tonnage, he said, and as the 
Japanese yards cannot supply the tonnage 
needed, it will now be necessary to come to 
the United States. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 




Affiliated witli 

AIV1ERICAN FEDERATiON OF LABOR. 

and 

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS' FEDERATiON. 



THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 
328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PlCitCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 
Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE. Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 
NEW YORK CITY....GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa... OSCAR CHRISTIANSEN. Agt. 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va T. NELSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala W. F. CATTELL, Agent 

GSVa South Michael Street 

NEW ORI-EANS, La O. MORTENSEN, Agent 

400% FulloM Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex D. F. PERRY, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I H. BLANKE, Agent 

432 South Water Street 

PORTLAND, Me C. MARTELL, Agent 

348 Fore Street 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., 3rd Floor, California 
St., nr. Montgomery. Phone, Sutter 5807 (Adv.) 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. V u South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGF;. Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 
Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. QUINN, Agent 

54 Commercal Place 

NEWPORT NEWS WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

BALTIMORE, Md F. R. STOCKL, Agent 

802-804 South Broaaway 

PHIL.\DELPHIA, Pa..O. CHRISTIANSEN, Sub. Agt 

206 Moravian Street 

MOBILE, Ala C. RAVING, Sub. Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex...G. SCHROEDER, Sub. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex J. CLAUSEN, Sub. Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 40 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 
New York Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y 110 Hamilton Avenue 

Branches: 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 221 20th Street 

BOSTON. Mass 3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, Va ol3 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400y2 Fulton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 27 Wlckenden Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency: 
GLOUCESTER, Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 THOS. A. HANSON, Treasurer 

328 W. Randolph Street, Phone Franklin 278 

BUFFALO, N. Y GEORGE HANSEN, Agent 

55 Main Street, Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O GEO. L. MARTIN, Agent 

308 W. Superior Avenue, Phone Main 1842 

MILWAUKEE, Wis CHAS. BRADHERING, Agent 

162 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich K. B. NOLAN, Agent 

44 Shelby Street, Phon» Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 47 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, O S. R. DYE, Agent 

704 Summit Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. O JOHN MORRIS, Agent 

992 Day Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 

PATRICK O'BRIEN, Afrent 

122% Main Street, Phone 890 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

Phone South Chicago 1B99 

SUPERIOR, Wle »«2 Banks Avenue 

(Continued on Pure 11.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

8. A. SILVER Business Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Office, Maritime Hall Building, 

69 Clay Street, San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 222S. 

Changes In advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To Insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for In Section 1103, Act of Octo- 
ber 3, 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers -will be 
published In the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writers name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1919. 



DO AMERICANS GO TO SlCA? 



It does really appear as if this old query 
can at last be answered in the affirmative. 

Actinj;- upon the request of Andrevi^ 
I'uruseth the nationality statistics of the 
(liiTerent units composing the International 
Seamen's Union of America are now being 
brought up to date. 

Advance information ui)on the compihi- 
tion just completed from tlie records of 
the Sailors' Union of the Pacific shows 
that from May 25, 1919, the date when 
the last census w-as taken, to September 
1 eight hundred forty-five new members 
were admitted to the organization. No 
less than 358 of these were native-born 
Americans. This number, added to the 
1251 natives on the records of the Union 
on May 25 makes a total of 1609 native- 
born members on the roll books. It should 
be understood, of course, that a very sub- 
stantial percentage of old and new foreign- 
born members are naturalized citizens of 
the United States. 

A glimpse backward for a couple of years 
makes the latest nationality census still 
more significant. According to the Union's 
census of July 15, 1917, there were only 
529 native-born members on the records. 

More than 95 per cent, of the sailors on 
the Pacific Coast are members of the Un- 
ion. A summary of the available data will 
therefore show the following facts : 

Native-born American sailors actually 
sailing in American merchant ships out of 
Pacific Coast ports : 

On July 15, 1917 529 

On May 25, 1919 1251 

On September 1, 1919 1609 

The foregoing ought to be pleasing to 
all Americans but particularly to those 
courageous souls who aifled in the passage 
of the Seamen's bill on the ground that 
America could never succeed in establish- 
ing a creditable mercantile marine under 
the Stars and Stripes unless America 
could also furnish the men to sail the 
shi])S. 

It was the contention of those who in- 
itiated the Seamen's bill that this could be 



done readily whene\'er Americans were as- 
sured of fair treatment, wholesome and 
healthful surroundings adequate compen- 
sation and reasonable advancement for 
faithful and efficient performance of duties. 

The AmiCrican boy for many years past 
has found nothing to invite but everything 
to discourage him when he looked toward 
the sea. He has been driven to other oc- 
cui)ations even when his taste and yearn- 
ing urged him to "do business on the 
great waters." 

Andrew Furuseth in one of his match- 
less historical sketches made it perfectly 
clear that the sea-power of any nation de- 
pends mainly upon the number of trained 
seamen that nation can furnish. There- 
fore, it is the part of wisdom to foster 
in every way the development of seaman- 
shi]) and make attractive to those who 
turn to it as a permanent occupation, the 
life of a mariner. 

Long before the days of Solomon the 
merchants of Tyre were operating ships 
and extending the trade to the then known 
regions. Their supremacy on the seas 
])assed, after supporting dynasties and 
building cities, by the use of ships, to 
Greece, then to Italy, then to Portugal, 
then to Spain, then to Holland, then to 
England, and finally to the United States 
in the days of the Baltimore Clippers. 

America threw aw'ay the proud title of 
"The Mistress of the Seas." And in the 
language of Senator Fletcher, "We de- 
liberately allowed this country to become 
a "beggar of ships,' and, with our com- 
merce paralyzed, a 'fettered and embar- 
goed trafficker' ; we changed the word 
'mistress' to 'vassal.' " In brief, America 
adopted the policy of neglecting her sea- 
men, finding crews wherever they could 
be had for the least money, taking the 
foreigner stranded on our shores, picking 
up the derelicts, treating them outrageous- 
ly, until the word "sailor" became a by- 
word and a reproach. Until the organized 
seamen of America took their grievances 
to Congress and the Act of December 21, 
1898, took efifect, seamen could be impris- 
oned for leaving an American vessel in an 
American port and held against their will, 
to service. Until the Seamen's Act which 
became efifective as to foreign vessels in 
August, 1916, under treaties denounced by 
that Act, seamen on foreign vessels could 
be arrested and imprisoned by our courts 
for leaving their vessel. And it was not 
until that Act went into full effect that all 
seamen were set free in this country. 

The net result of this legislation has 
exceeded even the most hopeful expecta- 
tions of the Seamen's real friends. 

Americans are coming back to the sea. 
American boys are again manning Amer- 
ican ships. And America's future ujjou 
the water is again reasonably safe— calam- 
ity howlers and coolie labor champions to 
the contrary notwithstanding. 



Peace is the balm upon the wounds caused 
by treachery and misunderstanding. It is the 
fraternal spark of friendship and compre- 
hension flying from the emery wheel of 
ignorance and hate. Only when the devil's 
agents of secret diplomacy, commercial greed, 
anrl national animosities are hurled to ob- 
livion liy a wider understanding, and a human 
comradeship will there be a peace worth, 
while. 



A SPLENDID TRIBUTE. 



The current issue of "The Lamp," pub- 
lished by the Standard Oil Company of New 
Jersey, is a special war number dedicated 
"to the employes of the company who, at 
the call to arms, laid down tool or pen to 
follow the colors, to those who, remaining 
at their tasks, so extended the products of 
an essential industry, as to make the whole 
world debtor to American petroleum, and 
above all, to the memory of those who, by 
land or sea, gave up their lives in the great 
cause." 

In expressing regrets of its inability to 
place the names of the merchant mariners 
along with the names of the men of the 
army and navy, "The Lamp'' pays the fol- 
lowing eloquent tribute to those men : 

To the sailors of the merchant marine there 
is due from the American people an unstinted 
tribute of the deepest respect. 

For these men no bands played martial 
music nor flags waved farewell. For them 
there was none of the exaltation of patriotism 
in the mass, nor the inspiring fervor of the 
phalanx. 

To them death beckoned from the deep. In 
the bowels of the leviathan they labored 
mightily, unheialded, unwitnessed, almost alone. 
Along the ocean highways lurked the Hun, in- 
sensate with the lust of blood. Beneath the 
torpedo's impact, the iron walls of their ship 
became a tomb. 

Quietly, impersonally, loyally these men of 
the merchant marine braved the dangers and 
performed their part. Ships sailed; tlie pall of 
silence closed. Women and children waited. 
Many of these ships did not come home. 

To the memory of those who lost in the great 
gamble with death there m\ist l)e some day, 
and shall be. a national tribute paid, and to 
their dependents a national ofifering commen- 
suraie with their deeds. 

To those whom the finger of fortune guided 
safely through the maze, there is due that 
tribute of respect which cannot be rendered 
here because they are anonymous. Having done 
their part, they have scattered over the seven 
seas, going quietly, unostentatiously, about 
their work as though the service rendered in 
the hour of national danger were no more than 
an incident in the seaman's life. 

It will be interesting to note that during 
the great war, before and after the United 
States entered the conflict, there were sunk 
on the high seas no less than ten steamers 
of the Standard Oil Company (New Jersey) 
fleet. In this piratical activity on the part 
of the German underseas craft, 63 men lost 
their lives and six were taken prisoners and 
earned off to Germany. 

The lost vessels included one general 
cargo steamship, the "Campana," and the 
following tankers: "Healdton," "John D. 
.\rchbold," "Llama," "!Moreni," "Motano," 
"Petrolite," "Platuria," "Win. Rockefeller," 
"O. B. Jennings." 



A GRATIFYING COMPARISON. 



Under direction of the United States 
Shipping Board, its Division of Planning and 
Statistics recently undertook an analysis of 
commerce carried in vessels under control of 
the Board. The month of June was selected 
for this inquiry. It was an extensive one, 
involving an examination of the manifests of 
all vessels under the American flag which 
had sailed out of American ports during that 
l)eriod. 

The result now made public shows that a 
fleet of 293 freighters steamed from American 
ports during the month of June, carrying 
1,177,444 tons of cargo. Of this number 243 
went out of Atlantic ports, 33 from Gulf 
l)orts and 17 from ports of the Pacific. 

During the_ entire year of 1914, the total 
value of domestic exports carried in .American 
l)Ottonis was $166,055,061. In the same period 
foreign vessels carried out American ship- 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



ments to the value of $1,861,735,581, or 91.8 
per cent, of the total value. 

The compilation just made by the Division 
on Planning and Statistics shows that in June, 
America's newly built merchant marine car- 
ried domestic exports valued at $268,228,502, 
or in one month $102,173,421 more than was 
carried during the entire year of 1914. 

To say that this is gratifying news is cer- 
tainly putting it mildly, indeed! It demon- 
strates that the American merchant marine 
is coming back to her own and it shows con- 
clusively that when national necessity sounded 
the clarion call to the sea our country, not- 
withstanding fifty dormant years, still had 
the required maritime genius and an abun- 
dance of the natural resources to found and 
maintain a great merchant marine. 



SEAMEN'S "HALF-PAY." 



The Circuit Court of Appeals (Fifth 
Circuit) has reversed the ruling of the 
District Court (N. D. Fla.) in the Dillon 
vs. the British steamship "Strathearn" 
case. The point at issue was a Seaman's 
right to demand and receive one-half the 
wages due him, "at any port where the 
vessel shall load or deliver cargo," be- 
fore the end of the voyage. 

The District Judge had held that such 
demand could not be made until the ves- 
sel had been five days in port. This, the 
Circuit Court ruled, was an erroneous in- 
terpretation of the language in Section 4 
of the Seamen's Act which provides that 
such a demand for wages "shall not be 
made before the expiration of, nor oftener 
than once in five days." 

The opinion of the Circuit Court Judges 
also very ably disposes of several other 
points raised in this connection by the at- 
torneys for the "Strathearn." 

Altogether, this reversal of the decree 
issued by the District Court is a notable 
victory for the Liternational Seamen's Un- 
ion of America which has financed the 
case from the beginning. Next week's is- 
sue of the Joi'KNAL will contain the full 
text of the opinion, as handed down by the 
Circuit Court. 



ATLANTIC FISHERMEN'S WAGES. 



REPUDL\TED LOANS. 



Just prior to the beginning of the late 
war In Europe the Paris firm of Roths- 
childs loaned to the Russian Czarist Go\'- 
ernmcnt the sum of four hundred million 
pounds (£400,000,000) with which "to in- 
sure peace" and the continued life and 
prosperity of the Czar and his mixed band 
of followers. 

The French Government placed its seal 
of a])proval on the transaction, but it was 
s])ecified that the money should be dis- 
bursed only for defence. About the same 
time other French financial institutions 
advanced the Russian Government a fur- 
ther sum of £250,000,000 with a similar 
stipulation. 

It is now history that the Soviet Gov- 
ernment, on obtaining control, re])U(liate(l 
the financial obligations of the Czar and 
his group of lesser leeches. 

With these facts before them, the work- 
ers can more readily appreciate the bitter 
hatred displayed by all international finan- 
ciers for the i)resent Russian Scn-iet Rc- 
])ublic. 



Preliminary Report of Arbitration Board Which 

Establishes an Entirely New Method of 

Compensation. 



The following preliminary report has been 
made by the Board of Arbitration which was 
selected to adjust the claims of the Fishermen's 
Union of the Atlantic: 

REPORT OF ARBITRATION BOARD. 

This Board is constituted by virtue of the fol- 
lowing voluntary agreement: 
Resolution 

We, the undersigned, agree to submit the 
claims of the Fishermen's Union of the Atlantic, 
adopted at a meeting of its members held at 
Boston on July 22nd, 1919, to the Honorable 
Henry J. Skeffington, Commissioner of Con- 
ciliation, J. Walter Mullen, a member of the 
Massachusetts Board of Conciliation and Arbi- 
tration, and Edward F. McClennen, Esquire, 
Special Assistant to the Attorney General of 
the United States, for arbitration, settlement, ad- 
justment, and recommendations: The findings 
of said Arbitrators to be unanimous, to be final 
and binding upon said Fi«hermen's Union, and 
all of the vessel owners who may become parties 
to this agreement, — subject to the following 
understanding, viz.: 

1. The Fishermen's Union shall forthwith 
provide all vessel owners who become parties 
to this agreement with fishermen, and their com- 
pensation shall be determined by said Board at 
the earliest possible date. 

2. Said Arbitrators shall from time to time 
as occasion arises, after due hearing,' make such 
findings as they shall deem just and equitable 
for the prevention and adjustment of grievances 
and disputes which may arise in the Fishing In- 
dustry of New England, and for the promotion 
generally of amicable relations between em- 
liloyers and employes therein, with the under- 
standing that there shall be no strikes or lock- 
outs pending the life of the agreement and that 
all matters of dispute shall be submitted to said 
Arbitrators. 

BAY STATE FISHING CO., 

By Arthur P. French, Secretary. 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 
ATLANTIC, 

Samuel R. Cutler, 
Augustine Airola, Attorney. 

BOSTON TRAWLING CO., 
A. L. Parker, President. 

COMMONWEALTFI FISHING CO., 
Paul F. Wadleigh, Treasurer. 

JOHN OLSEN, Business Agent. 

Marine Firemen's, Oilers' and 
Watertenders' Union of the Atlan- 
tic and Gulf; 

PATRICK COLLINS, 

Masters, Mates & Pilots; 

JOHN H. MADDEN, 

F'ish Handlers' Union, President. 

W. J. GORKUM, 

P'or Master Fishermen's Associa- 
tion. 

ALBERT ARNOLD, 

Gillnetters, Gloucester. 

EAST COAST FISHERIES CO., 
By its Attorneys, 

John C. Howard, 
Francis G. Goodale. 

The demands of the Fishermen's Union of 
the Atlantic were adopted at a meeting of that 
Union on July 22, 1919. The most prominent 
feature of these demands is for the fixing of a 
definite minimum value for fish in reckoning the 
proportionate compensation of the fishermen. 
It will require time to determine satisfactorily 
whether or not this method of compensation is 
just and feasible. Meanwhile it is of the ut- 
most importance to the fishermen, to the vessel 
owners and to the public that fishing should not 
be at a standstill. The fishermen are disinclined 
to resume fishing without knowing the terms on 
vv'hich they are working. 

In view of these considerations the arbitrators 
are unanimously of the opinion that the interest 
of all requires that an iinmediate temporary 
recommendation and adjustment be made which 
is to be operative only for the time stated below 
and is not to affect the final adjustment and set- 
tlement to be made by the arbitrators after hear- 
ing the parties to the arbitration more fully. 

Accordingly, the arbitrators pursuant to the 
arbitration agreement find and recommend that 
as to all fish landed between August IS, 1919, 
and October IS, 1919, the following terms shall 
be in effect between vessel owners and fisher- 
men, namely: — 

1. The manner of computing the compensa- 
tion of fishermen shall be as has been customary 
heretofore, which is understood by the arbitra- 
tors to be that the fishermen receive an atnount 
proportionate to the total net proceeds of the 
catch after customary deductions, except in the 
c;ise of fishermen on steam trawlers, who receive 
I'orly Dollars ($40.0(1) \>vr month and seven- 
tontlis (7-lOtlis) of one per cent (l'/) on the 
stock. 

2. l'"or the puri)o,se of reckoning this propor- 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 8, 1919. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m , Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping good; lots of members ashore. 
I'ull Shipwreck Benefit was awarded to the 
members of the crew of the S. S. "Unimak." 

Jos. Faltus was elected Agent for the Hono- 
lulu Branch to fill the unexpired term caused by 
the resignation of Jack Edwardson. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, 

Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Hall Bldg.. 59 Clay Street Tel. 
Kearny 2228. 

Victoria, B. C, Sept. 3, 1919. 
No meeting. Shipping slow. 

J. ETCHELLS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 
Street. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 3, 1919. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

W. G. MILLARD, Agent. 
. 58 Powell Street E. P. O. Box 1365, Tel. 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 3, 1919. 
Shipping medium. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 3, 1919. 

Shipping quiet. 

P. B. GILL. Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 

Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 3, 1919. 
Shipping good; men scarce. 

ED. ROSENBERG, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 3, 1919. 
Shipping good;, prospects good. 

lACK ROSEN, Agent. 
881^ Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 3, 1919. 
Shipping fair; men scarce. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128'/$ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Aug. 25, 1919. 
Shippinsj dull; prospects poor, 

TACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



San Francisco, Cal., Sept 5, 1919. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping good. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, August 22, 1919. 
Shipping good; scarcity of men. 

J. LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock. Room 203. P. O. Box 
214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, August 28. 1919. 
No meeting. .Shipping good; very few men 
ashore. 

L. BOTSFORD, Agent pro tern. 
613 Beacon Street. Phone Sunset 336. P. O. 
Box 54. 

DIED. 



Francisco Perales, No. 1869, a native of Chile, 
aged 24. Died at Manila, P. I., June 22, 1919. 



"Coast travel is increasing and there is no 
sign of its lessening for a long time to come," 
said E. Grant McMiken, general passenger agent 
of the Pacific Steamship Company. He adds 
that every steamer leaving between the north 
and the south carries a full passenger list. 
He also says that advance bookings made now 
will insure continued heavy travel. 



The Emergency F'lect Corporation has again 
changed its plans regarding the disposition of 
the two unfinished hulls at the Rodgcrs shipyard 
at Astoria, and has authorized the completion 
readv for launching. The work will be done by 
the lii)dgers Company immediately in order 1" 
make room for the construction of tlie third 
pier of the port dock. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(Rv Laurence Todd.) 



Will the railway shopmen strike? Pres- 
ident Wilson has said that wa^es must not 
be raised any more in the United States 
until the Government has had a chance to 
bring down the cost of living. President 
Gompers and the Executive Council of the 
A. !•■. of L. support President Wilson and 
ask the shopmen to give the Government 
ninety days in which to grapple with high 
prices. 

Before the appeal by Gompers and his 
associates went out several local unions 
had voted on the 4 cents an hour increase 
offered by the President, with the result 
that 80 per cent, of the men favored re- 
jecting the ofifer. The appeal from union 
headquarters at Washington is expected 
by leaders to swing the tide in favor of 
ninety days' truce. It is significant of the 
changed times, and of the many disappoint- 
ments suffered by the workers at the hands 
of politicians, that this appeal from A. F. 
of L. headquarters should be relied on to 
accomplish what the White House was 
impotent to perform. 

The shopmen filed their request for a 
raise as .long ago as February. By the first 
of August they had received no reply from 
the United States Railroad Administration. 
Their patience exhausted, the shopmen 
went on strike, despite all their leaders 
said to keep them at work. President W^il- 
son intimated that their wage demand 
would receive careful and prompt consider- 
ation if the men would go back. The men 
returned to work and began voting on a 
referendum to decide whether their de- 
mands should be decided by a new board 
which the Railroad Administration pro- 
posed to create. They were half way 
through that vote when President W'^ilson 
announced that all general wage increases 
must be stopped for the time being. The 
shopmen abandoned the first referendum 
and began voting on the President's pro- 
posal. Now Mr. Gompers and his asso- 
ciates have asked the shopmen, in efifect, 
to drop the second referendum and stay on 
the job for at least ninety days longer. It 
imposes a severe strain on the men's pa- 
tience, but Washington feels confident that 
the shopmen will agree to the further truce. 
Meantime 500,000 other men and women 
are on strike in various trades. There are 
also the big railroad brotherhoods with 
their demands for more wages already pre- 
pared and ready to be presented to Direc- 
tor-General Hines. Their appeal is an- 
swered before it is made, since the Presi- 
dent could not favor the brotherhoods after 
he had turned down the shopmen. And 
• the brotherhood chiefs have already allied 
themselves with Director-General Hines in 
the movement to stamp out the strike in 
California, Nevada and Arizona. The 
strike in the Southwest is "illegal," of 
course, since union officials have been de- 
fied by the rank and file, but it illustrates 
the temper of the men, who, although be- 
longing to many different crafts, have 
banded together and made the grievance 
of a few the grievance of all. 

It may be possible to explain the cau- 
tion of the railroad brotherhood chiefs 
partly in the light of their wish not to 
jeopardize the Sims Bill, which embodies 
the Plumb Plan for owner.ship and opera- 
tion of the roads. W^hen all other methods 



have failed to do justice to both the em- 
ployees and the public, it is not doubted 
that the organized workers will consider 
using their economic power to force a 
scientific settlement of the transportation 
problem. But the Plumb Plan generals do 
not wish to appear in the false light of im- 
petuous demagogues. They want every- 
body and every plan to have a hearing in 
public before the issue is pushed to a finish. 
Assistant Secretary of Labor Louis F. 
Post made some searching remarks the 
other day to a reporter who asked him to 
comment on "profiteering labor unions." 
The reporter wanted Secretary Post espe- 
cially to say a word about "labor's moral 
duty to increase production and to remem- 
ber that social service is the only real test 
of worth." 

"Certain groups of labor may be guilty 
of profiteering," said Mr. Post, "but I be- 
lieve they are very few in number. And 
we cannot scold even those groups unless 
we also scold those landlords, employers 
and investors who live in plenty of luxury 
without giving any labor whatever to so- 
ciety. It is wicked for any person or group 
of persons to take more than he or it con- 
tributes to society. That applies to all 
alike." 

The reporter asked if the high wages 
paid during the war had not demoralized 
the working man and given him a wrong 
conception of values. Mr. Post replied : 

"It is no nfew thing for the poor to imi- 
tate their 'betters.' Among rich and poor 
the general ideal of success has been for 
the individual to accumulate so much 
money that he and his family could live 
always without work. And we always 
thought it was smart for a person to suc- 
ceed that way. We never cared how many 
workmen became parasites so long as they 
did it one at a time. But when millions 
of them, organized as trade unionists, ask 
only for a little shorter day and a few 
more dollars a week, we become frightened 
and cry out that the country is going to 
ruin. 

"The world can support just so many 
parasites, and no more. In the old days the 
great majority of people were willing to 
work while a select few did nothing. If 
the masses were still willing we could go 
on in the same old way. But standardized 
education has given the people standardized 
tastes. We all want pretty much the same 
things, in the way of material comforts and 
leisure to cultivate our minds. 

"Perhaps these demands of labor, which 
you call excessive and ruinous, have taught 
us the great lesson that since everybody 
cannot loaf, then everybody must work, 
as some are not going to work while others 
do the loafing." 

On the matter of labor's moral duty. 
Assistant Secretary Post said: 

"The moral sense is a sense of responsi- 
bility. To take profits, for example, without 
being responsible for the way they are 
created, is very immoral. On the other hand, 
the old system required that labor take its 
wage without being responsible for the man- 
agement of an industry or its effects upon 
the public. That was, in a sense, non-moral. 
"To-day we find labor asking for a share 
in the management of industry, and that is 
a step toward higher morality in industry. 
In fact, it is this demand from labor for a 
bigger share of responsibility that makes 
some people cry out about labor's 'moral 



duty,' I think. Labor's great duty is to feed 
and clothe the world and make it happy, and 
in that it will not shirk for long. But it 
will insist that the whole population be 
purged of drones so that everything we pro- 
duce shall be enjoyed only by those who help 
produce it." 

The British people have a notable record 
in the peaceable adjustment of serious do- 
mestic problems. They have had mighty few 
violent revolutions. W'hen an issue reached 
the breaking point the British have always 
found a way to avoid a smash-up. For this 
and other reasons much timely interest at- 
taches to the following messages sent to 
organized labor of the United States from 
the National Transport Workers and the 
National Union of Railwaymen of Great 
Britain and Ireland. The first message, 
signed by C. T. Cramp, president of the rail- 
waymen, reads : 

'T desire to extend you hearty greetings 
across the Atlantic. I understand that you 
are well organized in strong but sectional 
trade unions, that you have power to enforce 
comparatively good labor conditions, but do 
not officially use the power of your unions 
to safeguard your civil liberties. I do not 
know of the circumstances surrounding your 
movement, but would like to give you the 
point of view of the National Railwaymen's 
Union of the United Kingdom. 

"W^e believe in the industrial form of or- 
ganization. We organize men on the engine, 
on the track, in workshops and in the factory 
departments of the rail service. We believe 
our industrial power should be used to ad- 
vance and protect our interests wherever they 
may be threatened, whether in our industrial 
or civil life. Liberty really means to us 
more than bread. 

"At this moment we are taking the opinion 
of our members whether they intend to take 
industrial action in order to recover the lib- 
erties they have lost during the war. In con- 
junction with the Triple Alliance we are bal- 
loting our members to determine whether 
they will strike to compel the Government to 
abolish conscription, abandon the use of the 
military in labor disputes, and cease making 
war on Russia. We are not taking this step 
without grave thought. But in our dealings 
with the Government, it has again and again 
proved false to its promises and false to the 
people. We believe that direct industrial ac- 
tion is our only recourse. 

"We hope that you will approve our posi- 
tion, and that further, you will find some 
way of acting through your unions, according 
to your own usages, to uphold us. As the 
needs of labor become international, more 
and more we must pursue the same roads to 
freedom, peace and economic equality." 

The other message, from Robert Williams 
of the Transport Workers, reads: 

"We in Great Britain, despite our conserv- 
ative outlook, have fashioned an industrial 
organization which is probably the most po- 
tent ever created— the Triple Alliance. In 
this body we 300,000 transport workers have 
allied ourselves for defensive and aggressive 
purposes with 500,000 railroad workers and 
800,000 miners. 

"Hitherto Me have devoted ourselves to 
matters of an exclusively economic and in- 
dustrial nature, but compelling circumstances, 
arising out of the world war and its after- 
math, require us more and more to envisage 
our work in its entirety, political as well as 
industrial. Every act of the working people 
tends more and more to become a political 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



act, and none can draw a clear dividing line 
between industrial and political action. 

"To-day we of the Triple Alliance are chal- 
lenging the Government's policy in main- 
taining conscription, military intervention in 
Russia, and military intervention in trade 
union disputes. 

"We see in the fight against the workers 
of Russia an attempt to safeguard the inter- 
ests of English bondholders, and we realize, 
perhaps more by instinct than by reason, that 
the fight of the Russian and Hungarian work- 
ers is in fact our own fight. We know, more- 
over, through experience, that conscription 
means the possibility of breaking strikes by 
means of the intervention of armed soldiers 
and sailors. Therefore we are taking the 
only means at our disposal to compel the 
Government to abandon conscription and 
get out of Russia. 

"We earnestly hope that America will not 
be the stronghold of capitalism during this 
world-proletarian crisis which is at hand. 
America, with its international origin, should 
be in the van of the world movement for 
working-class liberty. May we therefore urge 
upon American trade-unionists the duty of 
assisting struggling Europe in what is not 
a make-believe but a real fight for freedom." 



SCHWAB'S IDEAL UNION. 



In an address recently, Mr. Schwab 
made the statement that he favored or- 
ganized labor, but he could not approve 
all the things that it did. One of the things 
that he disapproved of was our method 
of organizing. The much-abused "organi- 
zer" seems to be one of the things that 
he disliked. From his point of view the 
organizer was a foreigner and an interloper 
when he came to organize the employes of 
a shop in which he did not work. Mr. 
Schwab doubtless would like to have an 
organization that suits his particular idea, 
and one that he could tell the members 
what they should do; but to have a mili- 
tant that has some force and effect for 
the good of the members is not to the 
liking of Mr. Schwab. He has been so 
used to handling a lot of stockholders and 
telling them where they must get off — and 
his employes also, for that matter — that 
he always wants to have the whip hand 
and be in position to use it when it, in his 
judgment, needs to be used. He doubtless 
would like to have a union organized on 
paper, with some of his pets and lick- 
spittles at the head of it whom he could call 
into the ofifice at times and give him a lot 
of guff as to what a fine fellow he was, lay 
down a few views as to what ought to be 
done and then tell him to go back to the 
shop and carry them out, keep the boys 
quiet and keep on grinding. But anything 
that has any force or virility about it does 
not come within the meaning of Mr. 
Schwab's interpretation of a labor union. 
Up to quite recently Mr. Schwab's in- 
fluence has been able to smother any at- 
tempts to organize his mills, the ice was 
broken in some places by the influences of 
the war and some growth was started ; but 
the constant laying of barrage fire makes it 
very bard for the organizers to go over 
the top. However, since Mr. Schwab so 
expressed himself, let us hope that he may 
have seen a little light, and let us hope 
further that he may see more as the 
months fly by. 



OREGON'S STANDING TIMBER. 



Demand the union label. 



The amount of timber standing in Ore- 
gon is estimated at 400,000,000,000 feet— 
one-sixth of the timber of the United 
States. Area, 29,000 square miles. 

The annual cut is about 2,000,000,000 
feet. Value, $30,000,000. 

Every county has some timber. The 
largest areas are on both slopes of the Cas- 
cades. Tributary to Tillamook Bay are 31,- 
000,000,000 feet of standing timber; in the 
Nehalem district are 20,000,000,000 feet 
more. In the coast range are 12,108,000,000 
feet; on the west and east slopes of the 
Cascades are, respectively, 87,083,000,000 
and 27,534,000,000 feet, and in eastern Ore- 
gon, 17,928,000,000. The forests are dis- 
tributed along the coast, in the mountains 
and in the eastern section. Timber runs 
from 100 to 350 and even 500 years old. 
Trees are immensely large and tall. 

The supply comprises Douglas fir, spruce, 
hemlock, yellow pine, sugar pine, white 
pine, noble fir, silver fir, red fir, white ce- 
dar, tamarack, white fir, oak, ash, maple, 
etc. Trees often cut 20,000 feet each. 
Some diameters of logs show: sugar pine, 
144 inches; yellow pine, 60 to 180 inches; 
white pine, 10 to 16 inches; red fir, 24 to 
144 inches; other trees, 10 to 72 inches. 
The red fir often reaches 300 feet in height. 
The segregated varieties of standing timber 
show red and yellow fir (Oregon pine) 255,- 
000,000,000 feet ; spruce, 10,000,000,000 ; red 
and white cedar, 10,000,000,000, noble fir 
(larch) 2,000,000,000; hemlock, 7,000,000,- 
000; sugar and yellow pine, 80,000,000,000. 
In southern Oregon are immense areas of 
juniper, durable and good for fence posts. 

The timber measure per acre is from 10,- 
000 to 50,000 feet; the stumpage value, 
from 50 cents to $3 ; the extent of the na- 
tional forests is 13,364,163 acres, with an 
estimated stand of 135,000,000,000 feet. 

The Douglas fir (Oregon pine) is the 
most valuable timber for structural work. 
Its tensile strength is greater than oak, 
and it holds nails securely. It is valuable 
for railroad bridges and car building. It 
is eagerly sought for masts and spars. The 
timber is nearly all sound to the core. The 
only known belt of white or Port Orford 
cedar in the world is in Coos county. The 
hard woods are utilized by the school fur- 
niture factories. 

Under the timber and stone act, a person 
can purchase 160 acres of timber land by 
filing a claim thereon, and paying for it 
according to the cruise of the government 
cruiser. As a matter of fact, however, 
there are very few desirable timber claims 
left in Oregon. 



FOR CANADIAN VETERANS. 

Editor, The Seamen's Journal: 

A great many men who served in the 
Canadian army are now resident in the 
United States, particularly on the Pacific 
Coast. 

Under the original order in council deal- 
ing with the payment of war service gratui- 
ties, men who did not see service in France 
and men who were discharged previous to 
the signing of the armistice on November 11, 
1918, were not entitled to participate in 
same. 

Under a recent order in council this ruling 
has been changed and men who come under 
the above classification are now entitled to 
payment of gratuity. 



The assistant district paymaster advises 
me that a great many men who are entitled 
to gratuity under this order have not yet 
filed applications for same. 

I should appreciate it very much if you 
could see your way clear to make these facts 
public through the columns of your paper 
in the hope that they might be read by some 
of the men interested. 

If any man who comes tmder the above 
category will write me enclosing a copy of 
his discharge certificate I will be pleased to 
furnish him all particulars regarding this 
gratuity, also the necessary application forms. 
Thaking you in anticipation, I remain. 
Yours faithfully, 

Geo. F. Pyke, Secretary. 
B. C. Returned Soldier Commission, Parlia- 
ment Buildings, Victoria, B. C. 
Victoria, B. C, August 27, 1919. 



Having securely established the principle 
of electric propulsion in the navy of the 
L^nited States, attention is now centered 
on the adaptation of the same theory to the 
propulsion of the cargo and passenger- 
carrying ships which will make up our 
merchant fleet. Electric propulsion for this 
class of vessels has been slower in growth 
than the same principle applied to naval 
vessels. Engineers are now at work on 
Americon turbo-electric and oil engine elec- 
tric systems for cargo vessels in this coun- 
try, and they believe future development 
along these lines to be unusually bright. 

Labor's Economic Platform 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or 
compartments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



lias murmured, or even shown its disgust 
by staying away. Many a time an actor has 
protested against objectionable things he 
had to do or say on the stage— things that 
were never i)lanned by the playwright, but 
interpolated by the insistent authority of 
the manager. He often usurps the position 
of a producer, playwright and actor in the 
exercise of his ])owcrs within his realm, 
his theater, and in his misleading claim 
that he must give the public what it 
wants." 

Wants Economic Freedom. 

'Sarcasm and invective were hurled at the 
"independence" movement by Santiago 
Tglesias, member of the Porto Rican Senate 
and \. F. of T^. organizer, in a speech in 
which the trade unionist showed that the 
men who now favor "independence" from 
the United States have denied remedial 
legislation to the workers. 

"The independence agitation is a farce, a 
lie," said Iglesias. "What solution to our 
great problem does it ofifer What answer 
does it give to the cry of the workers?" 

The Governor and the Legislature were 
denounced because of their failure to act on 
legislation that is urged by the organized 
workers, and which would relieve housing 
and other conditions. 

Iglesias scored the newspajicrs of the 
island for their attcm])t to exploit the Chi- 
cago race riots. The speaker declared that 
these riots were not the work of the Ameri- 
can i)eople but were- due to the machina- 
tions of big business which is exploiting the 
Porto Rican workingman, denying him the 
right to join trade unions and having their 
island officials club him if he suspends 
work. 

Porto Rican workers were urged not to 
be tricked by the appeal for "independ- 
ence," which is urged by forces that would 
have them divide on this issue and forget 
their deitlorable economic condition. 



Shipbuilders Agree. 

Officers t)l the Metal Trades Depart- 
ment, American Federation of Labor, an- 
nounce that an agreement has been signed 
with the Atlantic and Gulf Coast Ship- 
builders" .\ssociation "which is practically 
our original proposition to the Atlantic 
coast shipbuilders." 

A board of ten members, ec|ually divided, 
shall be created to adjust grievances and 
to "interpret, determine and enforce the 
.standards of wages, hours, classifications 
and working conditions as set forth in the 
agreement." Wage rates now in force 
shall continue until October 1, next. 

Any national or international affiliate of 
the American Federation of Labor may 
become a party to this agreement if it has 
jurisdiction in these shipyards. The board 
will establish an office at some central 
point, and the expenses of same will be 
divided equally between the two ]iarties. 

President O'Connell of the .Metal Trades 
Department states that the Saturday half 
holiday will be one of^ the first questions 
to be considered by the board, although 
all },ards are operating practically on the 
44-hour basis with the exception of a few 
small yards and the rejjair yards in the 
New York district. 

President O'Connell also states that an 



agreement has been secured with ship- 
builders of the San Francisco and Puget 
.'-^ound districts which raises rates 8 cents 
an hour for all employes. This makes the 
new rates $4.80, $5.29 and the basic trades, 
$7.04. 



"Smoke Out" Gougers With Income Tax. 

Gougers and ])rofiteers could be "smoked 
out ' by publishing the income tax returns, 
according to United States Senator Walsh 
of Massachusetts, who has introduced a 
resolution empowering a committee of the 
Senate, on order of the President, to ex- 
amine the income tax figures with a view 
of ascertaining what the great corporations 
made and to what extent the "dollar- 
a-year" men profited by their contracts 
with the Government. 

"In my opinion," said Senator Walsh. 
"the chief causes of the i)rescnt high cost 
of living are ])rofiteering. waste in pro- 
duction and distribution and unnecessary 
e.x])orting of foodstuffs and other necessi- 
ties of life for the sake of larger ])rofits." 

The resolution says the obtaining of evi- 
dence of ])rofiteering is most difficult, be- 
cause such testimony must come "in a 
great ])art from those charged with • such 
unpatriotic practices, but, nevertheless, 
there is in the possession of the Govern- 
ment much evidence, only obtainable by 
an order of the President of the United 
States, that would assist in directing where 
and by whom excessive ])rofiteering was 
done." The resolution further declares: 

"There is a general demand that the 
persons, i)artnerships and corporations 
making excessive profits at a time when 
millions of .American families were sacri- 
ficing and suft'ering for the cause of our 
country, and millions of American youths 
were serving in the army and navy, all 
•of whom were ready to make every neces- 
sary sacrifice, and, in fact, many tlunisands 
of them did sacrifice their health, their 
limbs and their lives for the jireservation 
of America's honor, be known to the i)ublic 
in order that the people of this country 
may have in their possession the names 
of the persons, partnershi])s and corpora- 
tions that took advantage of the distressed 
condition of their country to amass wealth, 
as well by such publicity to prevent a 
repetition of profiteering in any future crisis 
in the history of our c^)untry.'" 



United States Wages Low. 

More than 27,000 employes of the federal 
and District of Columbia governments, 18 
years and over, receive less than 37j4 
cents an hour, or $1080 a year, according 
to a report by the Joint Congressional 
Committee on Reclassification of Salaries. 
The 27,000 employes comprise 26 per cent, 
of the 104,000 whose positions arc under 
the jurisdiction of the committee. 

It is estimated that the annual earnings 
of these 27,000 employes are less by $5,- 
271,000 than they would be if the mini- 
mum wage bill were in effect. 

The report recalls many tragic situations. 
One woman, 84 years old, with forty-nine 
years in the Government service, receives 
$729 a year as an assistant messenger. 
.Another case is that of a clerk having 
sui)ervisory resi)onsibility, 7.^ years old, 
who entered the service forty-one years 
ago at $900 a year, and is now receiving 
$1000 a year. 



ATLANTIC FISHERMEN'S WAGES. 
(Continued from Page 7.) 

tion and this perLcntagc, fish shall be computed 
to be of the value following: — 

New Fish 

1. Haddock (except old haddock) . .4^c per lb. 

2. Old haddock 3c per lb. 

.1 Steak cod 6c per lb. 

4. Market cod 4j^c per 11). 

5. Small cod 3c per lb. 

6. Large hake 6c per lb. 

7. Small hake 3^c per lb. 

8. Pollock with no cull 4c per lb. 

9. Cusk 3^c per lb. 

10. Halibut weighing over 5 lbs. shall be classed 
as white and shall be valued at..lSc per lb. 

11. Halibut that is grey shall be classed as grey 
and shall be valued at 15c per lb. 

12. Chicken halibut 10c per lb. 

13. That all sword fish, large or small, shall be 
classed as sword fish, and all percentage 
cease, nothing allowed for trimmings. 

14 Mackerel weighing ■<$ lb. or over. per lb. 

15. Mackerel under '/j lb per lb. 

Old Fish 

1. Haddock, 3c per lb.; Fish for salting, Z'/^c 
per lb. 

2. Large old cod, 3}/c per lb. 

3. Medium old cod, 3c per lb.; Small, 2%c 
per lb. 

4. Old hake, Z'Ac per lb. 

5. Old pollock; Dressed, 2 35-lOOc per lb.; 
Round, 2c per lb. 

6. Old cusk: Large, 2%c per lb.; Medium, 
2l4<: per lb.; Snapper, Ic per lb. 

3. If fish is sold at prices lower than the above 
stated values, the deficiency shall, for the purpose 
of compensating the fishermen, be made up by 
the vessel owners out of the vessel's share or 
otherwise. 

This preliminary finding and recommendation 
may lie changed by tlie arbitrators at any time 
before October 15, 1919, on reaching a decision 
as to a more permanent schedule and giving fif- 
teen days' prior notice of the time at which the 
change is to go into effect. 

Respectfully submitted to the parties to the 
Arbitration Agreement. 
(.Signed) 

hVnWARD F. McCLEWKN, Chairman. 
HKXRY T. SKEFFINGTON, 
J. WALTER MULLEN. 
Boston, Mass., August 14, 1919. 



AGE OF THE OCEANS. 



The age of the oceans has been estimated 
by a leading authority. Professor Frank 
Clarke of the United States Geological 
Survey, at about 90,000,000 years. This, of 
course, is only an approximation, but is 
based on carefully studied scientific data. 
-Ml the water was once contained in the 
vapor that surrounded the glowing, slowly 
cooling mass which is now the earth. After 
the gases combined to form water the pro- 
cess of making the ocean salt began. This 
was the work of the rivers. Mineral salts 
were extracted from the rocks over which 
they flowed and deposited in the' sea. Each 
year the action of the streams is said to 
make the ocean slightly inore salty, and 
this is the basis on which its age is calcu- 
lated. The amount of salt carried by the 
rivers of the world is computed by the 
scientists and compared with the total 
quantity in the ocean. After evaporation 
and the velocity of currents have been con- 
sidered, it is i)ossible to calculate how long 
it has taken to make the sea water as salty 
as it is today. .About 3J/2 per cent, of 
mineral salts and 96i/ per cent, fresh 
water make up the oceans. Three-fourths 
of the solid matter is common salt, other 
ingredients being chloride, sulphate, and 
bromide of magnesium. sul])hate and car- 
bonate of lime, and sul])hate of potash, be- 
sides traces of various other minerals and 
metals, including gold and silver. 



It has been officially announced that over 
one hundred and sevent\-fi\e thousand alien 
soldiers in the L'niled States Army have 
a])]jlied for citizenship under the Soldiers' 
Naturalization .Act of May 9, 1918. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



THE RIVAL CONSCRIPTION BILLS. 

( !!.» Charles T. Hallinan, Secretary American 
Union Against Militarism.) 



There are two conscripticin bills now 
jockeying for favorable action from Con- 
gress. 

One is the Chamberlain-Kahn bill, 
drafted by the amateur jingoes who belong 
to the Military Training Camps Associa- 
tion and who have modestly introduced 
bills in Congress voting commissions and 
Congressional medals to themselves for 
their patriotic service "in the enforcement 
of the draft act." No, I am not joking. 
That's the kind they are, as you will see 
by sending for House Joint Resolution 19. 

Their bill, which bears the euphonious 
title of the National Service Act, is the 
one that was lambasted to death by the 
National Guard Association a fortnight ago. 
I'nder its terms every boy of 18 would 
have six months" compulsory training in 
either the Army or the Navy. lUit that 
is not all. There is a little clause in there 
gi\ing the Army or the Navy the i)ower 
to reach into the training camps and 
"select" enough boys — dividing them up 
impartially between the various States — to 
bring their own numbers up to the strength 
voted by Congress. Those lads, chosen by 
lottery, would be "stuck" for seven years" 
service in the Army or Navy, like any en- 
listed man. 

This point should be no surprise to any- 
one. It merely bears out the contention 
which one hears on every side in sophisti- 
cated Army circles in Washington that the 
real ])ur])Ose of any conscription system 
is fo 'feed" the Army with volunteers, or 
if not volunteers, then conscri])ts. 

The other conscri])tion bill was draited 
by the General vStaff and bears the en- 
dorsement of that recreant liberal, Newton 
D. liaker. It pro\'ides for a standing army 
of 576,000 men (our ])resent law provides 
for 175,000) backed by a huge conscript 
reserve of 1,250,000 boys in training or 
just out of training. Running this great 
machine will be a huge caste of officers 
headed by six lieutenant generals, thirty- 
two major generals and eighty-eight briga- 
dier generals. 

Fancy the commotion this aggregation of 
generals will make in the land. Fancy 
their speeches before Rotary clubs and 
Chambers of Commerce, — the grave slobber 
of a caste so fat with salaries and per- 
<|uisites, so wedded to reaction, that before 
long their ])restige and utterances would 
make us the most detested nation on earth. 

Both bills quietly enact into our perma- 
nent law the draft acts. Don't forget that 
point. It is embarrassing to i)ublic officials 
who have plunged or dragged the country 
into war to have to ])ass, in addition, a 
law conscripting the citizens to fight. Poli- 
ticians, even Presidents, find that a political 
hardship and these two bills aim to spare 
the politicians of the future any such em- 
barrassment. Both provide that when there 
is a declaration of war the draft acts go 
automatically into effect. All the General 
Staff has to do is to grab the eighteen- 
year-old boys who are then being trained 
(estimates range from 600,000 to 1,250,000) 
and then (|uietly and soberly draw into the 
machine the subse(|uent "classes." Further- 
more it seems fairly certain, in view of the 
l)recedents established in our recent war 



for democracy, that in case of another war 
— say an invasion of Mexico — the panic- 
stricken courts would hold any disparaging 
remarks subsequent to the declaration of 
war as "tending" to interfere with the draft 
act," and by that token, seditious. 

Can these bills pass? 

Not if the country realizes their con- 
tents. But an enormous drive is going to 
be made. General Pershing's triumphal 
tour of the country will be part of it. So 
\\ill the November convention of the 
American Legion, wdien the reactionaries 
now in control of that organization of con- 
servative soldiers will try to jam through 
a resolution in favor of universal training 
or, failing that, prevent the radicals headed 
by Colonel Bennett Clark, the son of 
Speaker Clark, from parsing a resolution 
against it. 

But there are m.any handicaps. Some of 
the Republicans are getting worried over 
the issue. I understand there was some 
mighty plain talk at the Republican House 
caucus the other night from members who 
don't relish the activities of Kahn and 
VVadsworth. They don't want to jeopardize 
a Republican victory in 1920 by converting 
the country into an armed camp at the 
cost, as estimated by General March, of 
$900,000,000 a year, ' 

But the real fight is one of education. If 
the American LTnion Against Militarism 
can get the funds for reprinting and dis- 
tributing these damnable bills on anything 
like an adequate scale, those bills and all 
like them are as good as dead. 



MORGAN'S SILENT SIGNAL CODE. 



The late J. Pierpont Morgan had a code 
of signals for the guidance of his com- 
plaisant directors, according to the testi- 
mony of Charles AV. Morse in a recent 
trial at Newark, N. J. Morse had offered 
$13,000,000 for certain steamships owned 
by the New Haven road. The kindly Pier- 
pont offered to assist Morse, though Mel- 
len wanted $20,000,000 for the property. 
After the directors' meeting Morse found 
he had been turned down and asked Mel- 
len why Mr. Morgan's Avishes had not been 
carried out. "When we have a meeting of 
the directors," candidly replied Mellen, "I 
sit at the head of ithe table. If Morgan 
wants the matter before the meeting en- 
dorsed he sits at my right. If he does not 
want it endorsed he sits at my left. When 
the matter of turning the steamship lines 
over to you came up, Morgan sat at my 
left hand." 

This silent method of disposing of 
troublesome c|uestions without going on 
record reminds one of the system of giving 
recommendations adopted by certain rail- 
roads, as testified to in a blacklisting case. 
Crane linen paper is very popular with 
railroads. One grade is; watermarked with 
an upright crane, another bears the figure 
of a crane with his head touching the 
ground. When a discharged employe asked 
for a letter of recommendation he was un- 
hesitatingly accommodated. The prospec- 
tive employer held the letter up to the 
light. If the crane was upright, so, sup- 
posedly, was the applicant for a job. If 
the crane was turned down, so also was the 
job-seeker. y\nd it was all done in (he 
uentlcst and most urbane manner. 



Demand the union label. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 
LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS, WATERTEN DER<5 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone, Seneca 48. 

THOS. CONWAY, Secretary. 

ED HICKS, Treasurer. 

Branches: 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 74 Bridsre Street 

Phone, 428-W. 

SUPERIOR, Wis. 332 Banks Avenue 

Phone, Broad 131. 

iSuTH^r^JiP^o^^?,?' °'"° »»2 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

Phone, S. C. 1599. 
TOLEDO, Ohio... 704 Summit Street 

Phone, Main 4519. 
CLEVELAND, Ohio 1012 Superior Avenue 

Phone, Main 866. 

MILWAUKEE. Wis ig. Reed Street 

^„ Phone, South 598. 

DETROIT, Michigan.... 44 Shelby Street 

CHTPArr. T,i ^''°"®' Cadillac 543. 

CHICAGO, 111...... 332 N. Michigan Ave. 

^,^„^ Phone, Central 8460. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone, 890 P. J. 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street 

Telephone Seneca 896. 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary. 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, III 406 n. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND. Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis igz Reed Street 

ASHTABUl^ HARBOR, Ohio 85 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 704 Summit Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 

LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

Marine Hospitals: 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH.. CLEVELAND. O. 

Relief Stations: 
Ashland. Wla. Ogdensburg, N. Y 

Ashtabula Harbor. O. Oswego, N Y 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis 

Escanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee Wis 

Green Bay. Wis. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky. O. 

Ludlngton, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wig 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo O 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C p. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 66 

ABERDEEN, Wash p. O. Box 28* 

PUKTLANij, Ore s»^ .jj-y .-.ueci 

SAN PEDRO, Cal p. o. Box 67 

HONOLULU. H. T P. Q. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 58 Commercial StreM 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash.. 64 Pike St. Viaduct. P. O. Box 875 

PORTLAND. Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal... 613 Beacon Street. P. O. Box 57* 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 
SAN PEDRO, Cal P. Q. Box 54 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters. 

SEATTLE. Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C). Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

PETERSBURG Alaske 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box ISI 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION. 
SAN FRANCISCO Cal 9 Ml.ssion Street 

I'liiinc Siillfr :'L'n.-, 



MARINE FIREMEN'S AND OILERS' UNION OF 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

VANrOTTVER. B, C 329 Columbia Avenue 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 



B. C. COAST STEWARDS. 
VANCOUVER. B. C 619 RlohArds Mtr—t 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




The Farmers' (Finnish) Co-opera 
tivc Trading Company, with fiv( 
stores in the Michigan copper coun 
try, had a total sales last year of ^ 
nearly $250,000. 

Officers of the National Federation 
of Federal Employees have issued a 
call for the third annual convention 
of this organization, to be held in 
San Francisco, beginning Septem- 
ber 8. 

The report published by the Bu- 
reau of Statistics of the Labor De- 
partment shows a general increase 
of about 80 per cent, in the cost of 
living during the period from De- 
cember, 1914, to June, 1919, and the 
total advances in the two items of 
food and clothing within the same 
period were found to be the great- 
est. 

State Senator Buchanan of Vir- 
ginia, has resurrected the aged 
scheme to make it a crime for work- 
ers to strike. The lawmaker would 
establish that principle by making 
it a crime for Virginia workers to 
engage in a sympathetic strike. The 
Senator would not yet take away the 
right of an individual worker to 
quit his employment. 

While street car fares in Boston 
have been advanced from 5 cents to 
10 by three successive jumps, it is 
interesting to note that the Philadel- 
phia Rapid Transit Company has 
voted an increase of 7 cents an hour 
to conductors and motormen, volun- 
tarily, without changing its fare. 
The view is held that better condi- 
tions and cheap travel will provide 
the revenue for wage increases. 

The advice "produce more" that 
is being dinned into the ears of 
American workmen can not apply to 
the American hen since the govern- 
ment has uncovered vast holdings of 
eggs in cold storage plants. In St. 
Louis, Missouri, over 16,000,000 eggs 
have been seized, and it is reported 
that millions of eggs, stored by 
speculators, have been found in De- 
troit, Buflfalo, San Diego and else- 
where. 

Organized silk workers, members 
of the United Textile Workers, have 
won their strike against the J. H. & 
C. K. Eagle Company at Shamokin, 
Pennsylvania. The workers secure 
a flat \2y2 per ceat. increase, a 48- 
hour week in all departments and a 
virtual recognition of the union. The 
company sued the strikers for $500,- 
000 damages, but this has been 
dropped, as has an injunction that 
was issued against the strikers. 

Child mortality in July was double 
that of any previous month since 
the State records were kept, and 
State Health Commissioner Black of 
Connecticut has notified milk deal- 
ers that they must keep their prod- 
ucts in a sanitary condition. The 
quality of milk is blamed by this 
official, although other citizens sug- 
gest that another factor is the fail- 
ure of mothers to buy milk because 
of high prices and low wages. 

In its Business Section the New 
York Times complains that workers 
in the needle industry have become 
so extravagant that some of them 
go home in taxicabs, and goes on 
to say, "So-called democratization of 
industry will not help matters." The 
only cure the writer can see is the 
introduction into the industry of 
workers of other races, in whom the 
spirit of militant socialism is either 
less keen or altogether lacking. "In 
short, the only cure is the American- 
ization of the industry." 



Office Phone Elliott 1196 



Bstabllahed lg9« 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Date Methods In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

COMPASSES ADJUSTED 

712-13-14 SEABOARD BLDG. FOURTH and PIKE STREETS 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Sn* O 1^ F R ^ ^'* *^^* ^'^'^ label (in light blue) appears on the 
iVl v^ IV Hi rx. O box in which you are served. 

Issued b/ Aulhoiil^oi the Cigar Makeis Iniernn . al Union of America, 

Union-made Cigars 

m: '" 



'^"^'^^ EhiS (In1(flf$ Trtft \h» Ciftfv coni«nrd mthtt bcu »•«• tM(0 m*()t bya HlSt-QCS WortOA 






' CU/Ucf 



^i««a%>««gt»,^^g^;:4^»^v«Mk>«MS>5^a>.^«i!^ 



Seattle, Wash , Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mail forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to bold mall until arrived. 

Aase, Olaf Anderson, Sextes 

Abrahamson, HelftanAndersson, Gustav 
Abolin, K. Andersen Alf. -1638 

Abrahamson, John Anderson, Albert 
Anderson John (6) Andersen, Olaf -2099 
Adams, A. D. Andersen, Herman 

Anderson Adolf (4) Anderson, John N. 
Anderson Harry (2) Anderson, Julius 
Anderson, Chris Andewig, H. 
Anderson, John -ISOOAntonsen, Martin (3) 
Andresen, Jorgen Akerstrom, O. R. 
Anderson, Albert Antonsen, Anton G. 

H. (2) Alqulst, Cris 

Anderson, Charles Alexis, H. 
Andersson W. (2) Aspengreen, E. 
Anderson Rasmus 



Bang, Oskar 
Backlund, K. 
Backman, Axel 
Backstrom, F. 
Belmont. Joe 
Berg, Wm. 
Beversdorf, E. 



Bjorkstrom, A. 
Bloomgren, Adolf 
Bodie, Wm. 
Boyle, James E. 
Bolstad, Alf. 
Borgan, Arne 
Brown, Calvin H. 



Bertleson, Bertie J. Bratson, Jos. 
Bergkvest, Axel Bruce, Albert 

Berentsen, A. M. Brun, Dick 
Berkland, Hans J. Burgiss, J. W. 
Bibbs, Golden S. Bund, Nils 
Bjorseth, K. 



Campbell, John 
Camino, C. C. 
Carlson, Herbert 
Carlsen, Gust. 
Carlin, Carl A. 
Cartveit, C. C. 
Carlson, Gus. 



Burggraf, Albert 
Carlson, C. A. 
Carlson, Chas. H. 
Carlson, Gunner 
Carstensen, Carsten 
Casperson, Carl 
Carruthers, M. 
Clausen, Christ. 



Carlson, Oscar -454 Corron, George R. 
Carlson, John -1586 Cochrane, Robt. 
Carlson, Ingwald Cortes, P. 
Dahl, Ole Ditmanson, D. 

Davies, Chester O. Dreyer, J. 
Davies, E. R. Dunwoody. George 

Delaney, John Douglas, W. 

Dehler, J. Dunn, W. G. 

Dekker, D. Dutton, H. 



Elisen, Sam 
Evsner, Ingvar 
Erlkson, Erik 
Erlkson, Otto 
Erickson, K. 
Erlckson, J. R. 
Fox, Andrew 
Folks, H. 
Fuve, A. M. 
Fuidge, E. W. 
Franson, O. 
Fredrecksen, F. 



Enoksen, A. 

Eliassen, H. O. 

Elstad, John 

Klze, C:iil 

Ellis, J. 

Elling, Alfred 

Forevaag, C. 

Fair, Phaltl 

Feedge J. A. 

Ferguson, Robt. 

Felsch, C. 

Flatten, James i 

Flemmlng, M. 

Gabrielsen, P. 

Gamber, J. J. 

Gerson, Chas. 

Gibler, Karl 

Hanson, Olaf 

Hanson, Andrew 

Hansen, John P. 

Hanson, Josef 

Hanson, Peter 

Hanson, G. E. 

Hanson, John 

Halley, Wm. 

Haraldson. Johan 

Halseth, Ed. 

Inglebretsen, Olaf Isakson, Karl 

Iverson, Andrew " 



Groth, Karl 
Grunbock, John 
Gusjoos, O. 
Gustafsson, O. 
Hasselborg, Gus. 
Henrekson, E. 
Hendreckson, H. 
Hoik, Geo. 
Holmquist, Elnor 
Holland, J. 
Hill, F. 

Hilliard, C. R. 
Hunter, G. H. 



Jacobson, Johan 
Janson, E. A. 
Jansen, Emll 
Jensen, Nils 
Jensen, Henry 
.Tensen, Hans 
Johnson, A. W. 
Johansen, Ed. 
Johnsen, Jacob 
Johansen, J. 
Johnson, Peter M. 



Iverson, Ole 
Johnson, E. 
Johnson, Peter -2313 
.Tohnsen, A. 
Johanson, Jakob 
Johnson, G. 
Johnstone, Walter 
Johansen, Karl 
Johnsen, .Tohn 
.Tohnsen, Adler -256-' 
Johanssen. Erik 
.Johnson, P. 



Johansen, Karl -2127 



Karlstrand, G. 
Kastl, H. 
Karlson, K. 
Karlsen, O. 
Korsama, N. J. 
Kallio, F. 
Karlsen, E. 
Kempson, M. 
Larsen, Hjalmer 
Larsen, Segurd 
Larsen, G. 
Lampl, F. 
Larsen, Alex 
Larsen, C. A. 
Larson, B. G. 
Larson. Fred 
Lee. C. 
Iveskenen, F. 



Kines, J. H. 
Knudson, A. J. 
Koppen, O. 
Kother. H. 
Koppen, B. 
Kristlansen, .T. A 
Karhanan. E. 
Kutin. John 
Leeuwen, A. V. 
Lul. T. 

Leeravacg, H. J. 
Lldston, C. 
Ix)rgeman, F. 
Lund, Wm. 
Luetter, T. 
Lundberg, E. 
Lundgren. C. 
Ludereson, W, 



1240 



Mi)rt<>iis<-n. K. A. 
Matlif.'^eii, Segurd 
Mortenscn, H. 
Martindale, John 
Mardinsen, C. 
Malmqvlst, C. 
Manus, Johanus 
Mordison, A. 
Malone, B. 
Mercer, H. 
Meckelson, J. 
Melby, V. 
Meloen, Harry 
Melder, Albert 
Meskelsson, Erik 
Mikkelsen, K. -16 
Nelson, Emil 
Nelson, Carl 
Nelson, A. C. 
Nelson, A. W. 
Nelson, John 
Nelson, Robert 

-137 



Olsen, Chris 
Olsen, Nic 
Olsen, Albert 
Olson, Adolph 
Olsen, Ferdinand 
Olnes, Laurits 
Olsen, Arne 
Olsen, Robert 
Pakkl, Emll 
Paaso, A. 
Paterson, P. 
Paklesen, K. 
Permin, Jens C. 
Pederson, E. P. 
Petter.son, Adolf 
Pederson, Carl 
Pestoff, S. 
Peterson, Karl E. 
Rasmussen, Christ 
Rantenen, H. 
Reenhold, Gustov 
Robenson, W. N. 
Rosenberg, Adolf 
Sandberg, Otto 
Sandel, F. S. 
Sather, H. 
Sassi, W. 
Schmidt, W. 
Schuur, H. 
Seppala, Emil 
Seyfried, M. 
.Shoberg, J. 
Simmons, Jolm 
Smith, Emil 
Sodwick, Ben 
Sorenson, H. 
Solberg, Olaf 
Taice, John J. 
Tapper, A. E. 
Tessa bia, B. 
Thorsen, Herman 
Thammeson, Ole 
Thorsen, Hans 
Thorsen, "Victor 
Uhlnes, F. 
Vesgood, Jens 
Ward. D. 
Waggoner, Sam 
Walters, Al 
Walters, Ted 
Watt, John B. 
Weld, L. A. 
West, J. N. 
Winter, Theodore 



Miller, Frank 

Miller, A. M. 

Morrison, J. D. 

Morken, M. L. 

Moore, J. 

Morrison, Wm. 

Morgan, Wm. 

Moor, Thos. 

Moen, Robt. 

MacKay, James 

McGuire, T. 

McKenzie, D. J. 

McGuire, J. 

MacKay, Thos. 

McGregor. J. 
lOMcCoy, James 

Neilsen, Axel 

Noren, B. 

Nord, C. W. 

Nilsen, Andreas 

Nilsen, Hans L. 

Nimen, August 
Olsen, Hans 

Olsson, C. 

Olsen, Carl 

Olson, John 

Otterspear, Wm. 

Overland, Oskar 

O'Keefe, T. F. 

Pearson, Gustov 
Pederson, John 
Pettersen, Bjorne 
Pedersen, Karl 
Pelta, Henry 
Peterson, Ole 
Plantiko, W. 
Powell, H. 
Porter, A. 
Punis, A. 
Rosenthal, W. 
Rohman, G. 
Rosenblad, Albin 
Rund, Nils 

Sorenson, Tom 
Sorger, E. 
Strand, Alfred 
Stentz, P. 
Steffensen, S. 
St. Clair, Thomas 
Stratton. M. 
Suominen, F. 
Sundby, Alfred 
Sverdrup, Thorwald 
Svendson, John A. 
Swanson, Wm. 
Syversen, Oskar 

Thorn, Arvid 
Tonneson, Anton 
Tomquist, Henry 
Troverson, Louis 
Tyrrell, J. 
Tuorilla, J. 



Voldby, P. 
TV'^ilson, Gus 
"Wilson, C. 
Withberg, Alf 
Williams, Lloyd 
Wilhelmsen, Martin 
Wirta, Geo. 
WuUum, J. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 



.Anderson. Andrew 
.Andersen, Olaf 
Barrot, G. 
Brandt, Arv. 
Burmelster, T. 
Brun, Mattia 
Brant. Max 
Brandt. H. 
Carlson. O""'. 
Cnrmaok, "W. C. 
Dischler. P. 
Gomes. M. G. 
Hedrirk, Jark 
Jansson, John 
lansson, .1. A. 
Jensen. Joe 
Johanssen. John F. 
Johannessen. Alf. 
Johannessen. Jonas 
Johnson. Hllmar 
Khamp, S. 
KInnunen, AnttI 
'•ToT.riRa" .T p. 
Lutke, F. C. A. 
Malkoff. Peter 
Malmberg. E. 
Martinson, .^rlnlph 



Melners. Herman 
Miller. F. W. 
Miller, Walter 
Murk, Chas. 
.Newman, I. 
Nystrom. R. 
Olesen. W. 
Olson. A. 
Olson. W. 
Olsen. Alf 
Patterson. E. G. 
Pedersen, N. B 
Petersen, Axel 
Rahlf, J. 
Rlsenlus. Sven 
Rosenhla'^. Otto 
Rubins, C. A. 
Smvth. J. B. 
Soderlnnd. T'no 
Stalt, Axel 
Stanbeck. A. 
Svenson. B. 
Rundqulst. "Walter W 
Torln. Gustaf A. 
Valfors. Arvld 
Williams, T. C. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



L. H. Lindross, formerlj- on 
schooner "Commerce," is requestcil 
to call at the office of the U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 9-10-19 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER A. HATTEB 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORBa 

Store No. 1 — Cor, Main and First 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Creamatory and Columbarium In 

Connection 



Broadway at Olive St. 



East 18 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats. Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 
Room 4140 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor. First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLB 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

116-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Poi« 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



VESTENHAVER BROS. 



CUT-RATE STORE 

$5.00 Less on a Suit or Overcoat, 
Shirts. Shoes, Oil Skins. Rubber Boots. 
Overalls, Underwear, Sox, Pants. 

We make a special effort to carry 
In stock everything for 

SAILORS and MILL MEN 

UNION STORE 

208 East Heron St., - Aberdeen 
Between Rex and Wear Theaters 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

8TOCX OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS. 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENOETSON 

321 East Heron Street • Aberdean 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN. Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Belov7 Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measurt 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F. Sts., Aberdeen, Wash. 
1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 

"Ole and Charley" 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors' Rest" 

cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drink* 
21t EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 




Poverty 
is A Crime! 

IT isn't a crime to be poor, any more 
than it is to be murdered. The poverty- 
stricken man is not a criminal. He 
is a victim of a crime for which others 
as well as himself are responsible. Henrx 
Georee 33 years aeo eave a lecture be- 
fore the Knights of Labor the title of 
which was 

'Hie Crime of Poverty'' 

It has since become a classic and has 
touched the spark of ambition in the 
lieartg of thousands of men and inspired 
them to better thines. 
You can get a copy of this eripplng lec- 
ture, well printed in a neat, cloth-bound 
book, and THE PUBLIC. A Journal of 
Democracy, for 13 weeks for only 65 
cents. Let THE PUBLIC be your in- 
terpreter, aa it is for many of the great 
liberal thinkers of the day: Brand Whit- 
lock, U. S. Minister to Belgium ; Wm. 
C, Colver, Federal Trade Commiasioner; 
Ray Standard Baker, and hundreds o£ 
others. 

Frank P. Walsh, Joint-Chair- 
man of the National War Labor 
Board says: 

Every worker in America should 
be a subscriber to THE PUBLIC. 
All lovers of justice are striving 
toward the same end. THE PUB- 
LIC points the way. 
Write your name and address clearly on 
the margin, attach 65 cents, stamps oc 
money order, and with the first number 
of THE PUBLIC we will send you a 
cloth-bound and handsomely printed 
copy of "The Crime of Poverty." 

THE PUBLIC 

122 E. 37th St., New York Ctty 



Portland, Or., Letter List 



Amundsen, Ben 
Anderson, Albert 
Anderson, C. 
Ahren, Wm. J. 
Barkman. Peter W. 
Bieler. B. 
Hnhm, Franz 
Boyle. H. 

Christensen. E. H. 
Chrlstensen, H. P. 
Cunningham, G. F. 
Dahl, Louis 
De LonK. K. 
Duret, J. B. 
EUegaard, M. 
Elliot, Austin A. 
Erickson. John E. 
Guildersen. W. E. 
GelRer, Joe 
Graaf, John D 
Hanson, August 

-1134 
Harding. Ellla 
Hartman. Fritz 
Hauschlld, B. 
Heino, Gust. 
Hellman, H. W. 
Henriksen. Geo. 
Herman. David 
Hickey. E. J. 
Hngstrom. Karl I. 
Holmes, George 
Huber, C. L. 
Johansson, Charles 

-2407 
Jorgenson, Earl 
Jensen, H. T. 
.Tohnaon, C \. 
Jordan, H. S. 
TCasp. A. 
Tfnofskv. E. W. 
Kristiansen, Wm. A. 
T..aatzen, Hugo 
L,arsen, C. J. 



Larsen, Hanc 
Larson, C. -1632 
Learch, Paul 
Leskinen, F. 
Matson. Hemming A 
Matson. H. -1808 
Melgant, F. 
Mirliaels, R. 
Miller. Victor 
Miller, Harry 
Mlkkelsen. Harry 
Murphv. Prnnr-ls Leo 
Newkirk, Clifford 
Nordman. Alelc 
Nlflsen. .Tens 
Nilsen, Chas. 
Nelson, Harry 
Oe-llvtn. 'Wm. A. 
Ohlson, J. A. 
Olson, .lohn 
Olson. Chas. 
Paulsson, Herman 
Pfitersen. Anton 

-IfiVR 
Petesen. Knut 
Petter, G. 
Rensmand. Robert 
Ross, Geo. 
■Rulseaa'-d. Soren 
Ruud, Ole H. 
Rytko. Otto 
Snmuelsen. S 
Sohmeltning. Max M. 
Schroder. August 
.Schultz, F. E. 
Sibley. Milton 
Slebert Gust 
>'^tcenson. Edward 
Swenson, C. E. 
Thoresen, Ingwa'.d 
Tiihkar><»n. Johan .J 
■Wold. Frank 
Wood, E. E. 



San Pedro Letter List 

Amesen, Fi-ank Leisener, A. 

Anderson, P. A. Linden, M. 

-1695 Lindholm, Chas. 

Anderson. Sven T,indstrnm, J A. 

Andree. E. A. I>.1unggren, Albin 

Billington, T. A. Lonngren. Carl 

Bergh. B. Magnusen, Karl 

Brandes, W. M. Malmberg. Ellis 

Breien. Hans Martin, George 
Crrregsona. Vincent Mathis, Hartley 

Davis. Or-villp Matsen, Hemming 

Deneen. Frnnk A. Meyer, Claus 

Edmonds. Jack Monterro. .John 

Ellingsen. "Wm. Nelson. Chas. R. 

Emmcrz. A.. Nielsen, S. 

Evensen, Ed. Ole, Olesen 

Kxlesan, Herman Olin, Emil 

Falvig, John Olsen, Martin 

Fisher, W. -707 Osterhaff, Henry 

Folke, Harry Pedersen, Halver 

Frank, Paul Petersen. Hugo 

Franzell, A. H. Raaum. Henry 

Ganser, Joe Rasmussen, S. A. 

Grassen, Van Reith. C. 

Gregory. Joe Repson, Ed. 

Gunderson, B. C. Roed, H. 

Gunnerud Torvald Roed. L. A. 

Hansen, Olaf Rosenblad. Billy 

Hansen, nernard Ross, Wm. 

ITansen, John Samson. Louis 

Hansen. Johan Sanders. Chaa. 

Artur Schmitd. Tenuis 

Hansen, Chas. L. Shetld. Osc^r 

Heeshe. Henry Sindi)lom, Ernest W. 

>Till, Fred A. Skogberg. J. 

Holmes. Frank Smcborg. Olaf B. 

Hubner, Carl F. Snarberg. Charles 

.Tohansen. Carl Sternberg, Alf. 

Johansen, Anton A. Stenroos. A. W. 

Johnson. Matt Stone. Victor 
Johnson. L. T. -483Strom. C. L. 

Johannson, N. A. Sturankosken, M. 

Johnnson, John Suominen. Oscar 

Johanfon, Fritz Swanson, Ben 




SHARE /iljJ/THE VICTORY 

4aVE FORYOVRCOVNTRY ' |w"| SAVE FOR. YOVRSELF 



.(. 



\ ^ 



r 



f BVY mR' SAYINGS STAMPS 



Wil 



t^ 



HASXell Cctfirv. 



CARRY ON! 

Uncle Sam is releasing from his service the men who went "over 
there" to free the world from autocracy. Thousands of soldiers are 
daily receiving their honorable discharges; they pocket their pay, 
bid farewell to their comrades, and sally forth — civilians. 

There is one army, however, which must not be demobilized. 
That is the army of War-Savings Stamp buyers. More recruits are 
needed to carry on the campaign of readjustment which follows 
the signing of the armistice. 

The army of fighters has achieved its purpose. 

The army of savers must remain in "action." 

"Carry on" to a lasting peace under the banner of W. S. S.! 



Johanson, J. A. 
Johnson. J. E. 
Jonasen. J. 
Jones. Erest L. 
Kallio, Frank 
Kind. Herman 
Kolodzieg. George 
Kristoffersen, A. 
Larsen. J. -1542 
Lechemus, Bill 



Thompson, Alex. 

Thompson. Maurice 

Toivonen, F. 

VIzcarra. Oscar 

Wrigg, F. 

Wilhalmson, Karl 
J.Wahi, J. 
B.Yarvinen, V. H. 

Teaman, W. E. 

Zunderer, Heo 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Alfredsen, Adolf Marks. Walter 
Anderson, Harold F.Martenson, Adolp 
Carlstrand Gustaf Martinsson, E. 
Houge. Anton Meyer. Karl 

Kennedy. James ReaNielsen, Alf. W. 
Kennedy, Jas. Rea Nelson, C. W. 

(Package) Olsen, Robert 

Lapauble, Jean Reilley, Ralph 

Pierre Leyfried, M. -2962 

Magail, Michael 



You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stirring times 
In the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship It Is Increasingly dlflBcult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

win be specially represented at Wash- 
ington and win analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Follette Is making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from trie common people and place 
them where they belong — on excess 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and Incomes. Because of this he Is be- 
ing attacked more bitterly than any 
other m^n In public llf" 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year — Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine, Madison, Wit. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

I am representing the Union men 
who are entitled to salvage and 
members of the crew of the fol- 
lowing vessels. In most cases ac- 
tion- has commenced. In some cases 
ihe funds have been recovered. In 
others they are readily recoverable 
upon filing power of attorney form 
with me. Address this ofi"ice by letter. 
"Princeton" vs. "Ardmore," $7500 re- 
ceived. "Gulf of Mexico" vs. Bark 
"Portugal," $5000. "Gulf Coast" vs. 
"Boxleaf," settled. "Argonaut" vs. 
"Jason," funds received. "Iroquois" 
vs. "Skinner," settled, crews share 
$12,250. "Brasos" vs. "Iroquois," set- 
tled. "Maine" vs. "Theresa Ac- 
comme." "Oskawa" vs. "Westgrove." 
"Buda 2" vs. "Western Star." "St. 
Charles" vs. "Monte Cenis." "Flor- 
ence Olsen" vs. "Marina." Flor- 
ence Olsen" vs. "Claremont." "Alli- 
ance" vs. "Belvernon." "Donnelly" 
vs. "Irish." "Anacortes" vs. "S. O. 
Barge No. 95." "Fred W. Wellor" 
vs. "Overbrook." "Neptunas" vs. 
"Panama." "Quincy" vs. "Transpor- 
tation." "Herman Frash" vs. "Bril- 
liant." "O'Neil" vs. "Oregon." Bark 
"Superior." "Pan American" vs. 
"Santa Rita." "St. Charles" vs. 
"Tea." Tug "Navigator" vs. "Edgar 
H. Vance." "Tunica" vs. "Neppon- 
ier." "Lake Charles" vs. "Cantiwo." 
Silas B. Axtell, 1 Broadway, New- 
York City. 8-20-18 



Home Newt 



The city council of Butte, Mont., 
unanimously passed a resolution cre- 
ating the office of city grocer and 
authorizing him to engage in the 
grocery business. 

The Cleveland Railways Company 
has taken out an insurance policy for 
$10,110,000, against "riot and civil 
commotion." It is said to be the 
largest policy ever written. 

That the Federal Government take 
over the flour mills throughout the 
United States, besides subsidizing the 
nation's wheat crop, was advocated 
by Attorney-General Price of Ohio. 

In the opinion of Roger W. Bab- 
son, statistician of Boston, the ten- 
cent fare will become universal. 
Some subways and elevated lines 
now charging five cents will charge 
twenty-five cents. 

Figures showing that retail meat 
dealers in Washington are averaging 
100 per cent, profit on all sales of 
meat were cited before a Senate Dis- 
trict of Columbia sub-committee in- 
vestigating living costs in the Dis- 
trict. 

According to Dr. Alonzo E. Tay- 
lor, member of the United States 
War Trade Board and chief investi- 
gator of food conditions on Mr. 
Hoover's staff in Europe, "the United 
States has given no national indica- 
tion of having been affected by the 
high cost of living." 

A budget of household expenses 
purporting to show that $1,918 is the 
minimum on which a fainily of five 
can live for one year was introduced 
by Chicago packing house employes 
appearing before Federal Judge Al- 
schuler, Federal mediator, with de- 
mands for increased wages. 

According to the Monthly Bul- 
letin of the city Department of 
Health, recently issued, Minneapolis 
has the lowest death rate of all 
American cities for the year 1918, 
and Philadelphia the highest. The 
epidemic of influenza was the prime 
factor in increasing the mortality 
rates of every community in the 
land. 

Canned fruit prices this year are 
to be 40 per cent, higher than last 
year, according to announcements 
from the California Packing Cor- 
poration. California prune growers 
have the largest crop in the history 
of California. This year they will 
receive 13.56 cents a pound, as 
against last year's price of 8.5, and 
6 cents the year before. 

Since the armistice was signed the 
War Department has accepted the 
resignations of nearly 1,300 officers 
of the regular army. In July alone 
there were about 160 resignations 
accepted, more than twice as many 
officers as resigned in the entire ten 
years immediately prior to this coun- 
try's entry into the war in 1917. The 
investigation shows that the enor- 
mous increase in the cost of living is 
in the main responsible for the resig- 
nations. 

The House of Representatives has 
passed the first protective tariff meas- 
ure to be acted upon since the Re- 
publicans regained control of Con- 
gress. The measure levies high duties 
on chemical glassware and apparat«s. 
Duties of 60 per cent, ad valorem 
are levied by the bill on laboratory 
glass and porcelain wares and 45 per 
cent, ad valorem on optical glass, and 
philosophical, scientific and labora- 
tory apparatus. The bill, which was 
framed by Representative Bacharach, 
of New Jersey, now goes to the 
Senate. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Domestic and Naval 



Till- boom in tran.^atlantic travel is 
increasing, and both the Cunard and 
the White Star lines have waiting 
lists of passengers extending to late 
October. The Canadian Pacific has 
waiting lists of 12.(X10 names for 
cabin accommodation and applica- 
tions for berths are still coming in 
at the rate of 1,500 a day. 

All the passengers on the United 
States Shipping Board steamer "Hef- 
fron," which went ashore ofT Boku- 
ren, Korea strait, on August 18, have 
l)een landed at Moji, Japan, where 
they are remaining pending the re- 
floating of the vessel. On board 
the "HefTron" at the time she went 
aground were 833 sick and wounded 
Czecho-Slovak soldiers from Siberia 
and nine American Red Cross work- 
ers, of whom five were women. 

I'lighteen men were believed to 
have lost their lives when the motor- 
ship "Loline" overturned in a rough 
sea while on a voyage from Apia to 
the island of Savaii (Samoa). Eight- 
teen were saved. The rescue was 
effected after three men swam from 
the ship to the shore, taking twenty- 
five hours, according to their reports 
to the authorities. These men took 
empty cases to protect themselves, 
but one of the men gave out and 
for fifteen hours he was held by one 
of the others, who swam to the 
shore with him. The seas were run- 
ning high all of the time the men 
were in the water. They were 
picked up at the western end of 
Ui)olu island and word sent to Apia, 
from whence a steamer went to the 
scene of the wreck. 

As agents of the all-Russian Gov- 
ernment and acting under instruc- 
tions from .\dmiral Kolchak, Nicotar 
GherassimofT and Alexander William 
Lawb have arrived in San Fran- 
cisco on their way to Washington 
to plead with the Federal authorities 
for transfer back to the Russian vol- 
unteer fleet of a score of vessels 
now controlled l)y Great Britain and 
the United States. They will pro- 
ceed from Washington to London in 
the interests of their mission. Re- 
turn of these vessels, they said, will 
expedite the establishing of a line of 
steamers between Vladivostok and a 
Pacific Coast port, San Francisco 
preferred, if all other things are 
eiiual. Gherassimoff and Lawb, who 
are president and secretary respec- 
tively of the Russian volunteer fleet, 
escaped from Pctrograd last Octo- 
ber by way of Omsk, Siberia. 

War conditions benefited rather 
than hurt the Dutch steamship com- 
panies operating in the Orient and 
Far East. The Java-China-Japan 
line has declared a 30 per cent, divi- 
dend, while the Royal Packet Com- 
pany recently announced a 10 per 
cent, melon cutting. The report of 
the Java-China-Japan line for 1918 
states that on October 1 the com- 
pany repaid to the Treasury the sub- 
sidy it had received in the course of 
the year and thereby brought its 
agreement with the Government to 
an end. Throughout the year the 
freight market was high, a fact that 
was reflected in its financial report. 
A considerable portion of the com- 
pany's revenue was derived' from the 
payments received for the requisi- 
tioned ships. Trafific of the Java- 
Pacific line was resumed in May w'ith 
the diminished fleet, but owing to 
numerous export restrictions the 
ships were unable for some time to 
obtain full cargoes. 



The San Francisco Savings and Lozoi Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, CaL 

Member of the Associated Savings Bank* of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH. Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30, 1919. 

Assets $60,509,192.14 

Deposits 57,122,180.22 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,387,011.92 

Employees' Pension Fund 306,852.44 



OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

QF-O. TOURNT, Vlce-Pres. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vlce-Pres. and Ca»hl«r 

B. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary 
WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 
GOOUFELLOW, EELLS. MOORE & ORRICK, 
General Attorneys 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAB 

GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSB HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 

E. A. CHRISTENSON L. S. SHERMAN 



San Francisco Letter List 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to tlie 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver, Business Manager, The 
Seamen's Journal, 59 Clay Street, San 
Francisco, Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Aberg, Einar 
Adams, Arch 
Adamson, Hj. 
Adamsson, John 
Aimer, Robert 
Akerman, V. 
Alto, H. 
.\ninell, Albert 
Andersen, Olaf 
Andersen, F. 
.\ndersen, N, 



Anderson, John F. 
Anderson, Edw. 
Andersson, Chaheles 
Andersson, O. L. 
Andersson, C. -2185 
Andersson, Arthur 
A.ngelback, Geo. 
Appelgren, John 
Ardt, Anton 

1473 Aro, Kalle 

-197«Ask, E. A. 



.■Vndeasson, A. O. Augustine. Anth. 
Andersson, C. -797 Austed, Barney 
Anderson, John A. 



Backe, K. V. 
Balco, Juan 
Benson. S. -986 
Bontuso Manl. 
Bergstrom, I. M. 
15illingtun Martin 
Bjorka, Hans K. 
Bleasing, W. 
Bjorklund, G. 
Bjorn, Kristian 
Blomgren, C. A. 



Bode, Wilhelm 
Bosshard, Henry 
Brady, B. 
Brain, Louis 
Browne, Chas. B. 
Bruuin, E. -2583 
Brynlng, W. 
Bugel, J. 
Bunting, A. 
Byars, Terry 
Bye, Alt. 



Cameron, James Christenson, Einar 

Cardell, Joe Clark, Chas. R. 

Carlson, Carl Collins, Frank 

Carlson, E. R. Conrad, P. W. 
Carlson, K. S. -1769Cordey, • Allan 

Carroll, James Correro. T. R. 

Catechu, L. Cox, R. H. 

Christensen, H. C. Crowley, Fred 
Christensen, R. H. 



Dahlcr, H. N. 
Dahlstrom, Sven 
Danleison, Harry 
Daskoland, N. N. 
Dawson, Herebrt 
Delahanty, J. J. 
Devenay, Ed. 

Edler, Fritz 
Edwards, Alex. 
Edwards, Ole 
Killers, Heinle 
Kinard, J. 
Elnartsen, Hans 
Kkeiand, I. 
iilo, Frank 
Engstrom, Ben 

Fagerly, O. 
Falbom, Albln 
Felsch, C. 
Fernandez, G. L. 
Flgved, Sigurd 

Oaougat, Frank 
Gedman, Tony 
Geer, A. J. 
Gibson, G. A. 
Gill, Ivar 

Hakala, Paavo 
Hakala, Paul 
Halvorsen, Chris. 
Halvorsen, Torlelf 
Hamilton, W. G. 
Hammer, Carl 
Hammerquist, A. 
Ilanschman, W. 
Hannesen. K. J. 
Hansen, Hans P. 
Hansen, Oskar 
Hansen, R. C. A. 
Hansen, J. 
Hansen, O. -2171 
Hansen, Kristen 
Hansen, H. M. 
Hansen, R. 

Ibsen. N. M. 
Ingebretsen, Alf. 

Jacobs. F. 
Jacobson, E. 
Jaderholm, Hans 
Jahnke, Paul 
.Tanson, C. J. W. 
Jansson, K. H. 
Jensen, J. F. 
Jessen, Carl 
Jeppesen, Lars 
Johanson, Carl 

Kaholemoku. W. 
Karlsson, Johan 
Kane. John 
Kennedy. .T. R. 
Kinamon, Jack 
Kinehorn. Frnnk 
Kiyanno, P. W. B. 



Didrikscn, Martin 
Driscoli, John 
Dumas, Clifford 
Dumas, J. 
Dunham, Chas. 
Dunkel, E. 



Engelbregtsen, C. 
Erije, Lewis 
Erirson, E. R. 
Erlkson, Chas. 
Esplund, Fred 
Essen, C. A. 
Evenson, A. 
Evonsen, Martin 
Eversen, Peter 

Forslund, Fred 
Foss, L. 
Frizzell, R. L. 
Frost, Peter 
Fuller, Geo. 

Goodmans, G. 
Gronroos, Elbin 
Grussman, G. A. 
Gundersen, Andreas 

Hanson, Frank 
Hanson, Carl 
Heaps, James 
Heldahl, T. 
Helland, Oie M. 
Henriksson. W. 
Hetland, Haivor 
Hewell, 
Hicks, Jim 
Hilll. Albert 
Hingren, J. Hj. 
lljorling, Hj. 
Holmgren. G. J. 
Iloiiand, D. 
Hy, Ben 
Hugo. O. -1934 
Hubertz, Emll 

Iversen, Iver 



Johansson, Gustav 
Johnssen, F. R. 
Johnsen, Walther 
Johnson. T. A. 
.Johnston, Leslie 
Jonsson, Erik 
Jorgensen, Ole E. 
.Torpen.'5<"n, Jorgen 
Juell, R. 

Knutsen, Karl 
Knudsen, Rangvald 
Koluin, Oscar 
Koolstra. S. 
Kristensen, A. -1095 
Krlstoffersen. G. 
Krohn, Harry 



Kjell, John 
Knox, David 

Lagerberg, Chas. 

Laine, J. E. 

I-amberg, Herman 

Lambert, John J. 

Lambert, S. I. 

Larsen, Fingl. 

Larsen, Kaare 

Larsen, J. H. -22S0Lonnqvist, John 

Larsen, L. H. Loughrey, C. W. 

Larsen, K. -1560 Lundberg, Oskar 

Larsen, Albln Lyngard, Geo. 



Krumiiolts, W. 



Larson, Herbert 
Lefter, John A. 
Lesse, Chas. 
Lewis, Wm. 
Llttchen, A. 
Lofgren, R. 
Loland, Louis 



Mahler, Hans 
Malioney, F. J. 
Marksman, H. 
.Maldonado, A. 
Marshall, L S. 
Martin, John 
Martiniussen, J. 
Mathis. H. 
Matheis, Herman 
McManus, P. 
McGiilivray, F. B. 
McNeil, D. R. 

Nagel, A. 
Nagie, Chris. 
Neindorff, F. R. 
Nelsen, Rangvald 
Nelson, Fred 
Nelson, Waldemar 
Nelson, John, -1013 
Nelson, A. W. 
Nelson, A. H. 
iN'euman, Alfred 
Nickolsen, L. 
Nicolaisen, S. 
Nielsen, Carl C. 

O'Connor, W. R. 
Olafson, C. A. 
Oisen, Jens 
Olsen, Karl 
Olson, Albert 

Parson, Herman 
Pedersen, F. H. 
Pedersen, C. -1286 
Pedersen, Peter B. 
Pendlebury, Tom 
Perdok. A. -1861 
Persson, Gustaf 
Persson, Edw. 
Persson, O. W. 
Petersen, O. -1595 
Peterson, L. -1389 

Raasu, slattl 
Kanlanen, F. 
Kasmussen, Emil 
Keitli, C. 
Renrall, A. 
Kiciiardson, E. A. 
KickhofC, W. 
Ridden, Allan 
Riesbeck, Hj. 
Ringdal. Ola 

Saalma, Joseph 
Sahlin, Nils 
.Sandblom, K. 
Sanderson, John 
Sandquist, Erick 
Sanne, R. 
Scott, B. F. 
Siiannon, J. 
.Siiivers, De Witt 
Sikman, A. 
Simonsen, Sigvard 



McNeill. S. R. 
Meek, O. J. 
Mettson, Carl 
Meza, Leonardo 
Mikkeisen, Olaf 
Miller, F. A. 
Miller, William 
Mittemeyei-, Y. F. 
Moe, R. 
Moren, E. H. 
Morisse, Henry 



Nielsen, C. -1303 
Nielsen, H. J. 
Nielsen, P. L. 
Nielsen, Willy 
Nielsen, C. -1314 
Nilsen, Edon 
Nillsen, Jens 
Nilsson, S. H. H. 
Nilsson, N. H. 
Nordenberg, Alfred 
Nummelin, Arthur 
Nunes, C. C. 
Nyland, A. M. J. 

Olson, E. A. 
Olsson, Axel 
Olsson. C. O. 
Oseberg, Ansgar 

Pettersen. Higbert 
Pililstroiu, R. J. 
Pilklnton. Homer 
Piironen, Mikko 
Pinkhurst, C. B. 
Porter, R. 
Preen, P. A. van 
Frinz, Carl 
Prun, John 
Pulver, W. F. 

Ringman, C. W. 
Robinson, L. R. 
Rohman, Geo. 
Ronning, H. 
Rosen, E. H. 
Rosen, V. 
Rundell, W. 
Rundstrom, Albert 
Rupp, Albert 
Ryan, Patrick 

Sparling, James 
Stange. A. -2063 
Steen, Ivar 
Stenssloff, E. 
Stevensen, Aug. 
Stewart, Nell 
Strasdin, P. 
Strasdin, H. 
Strandberg, Eiof 
Stranberg, P. 
Stratten, Harry 



yjoberg, Silas 
Sjolander, J. B. 
.Skogstrom, John 
Sinnlsvig, O. B. 
Smith, Jacob C. 
Sol berg, B. P. 
Solvin, Oscar E. 
Sonderup, A. 
Souza, Louis 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Sorensen, J. H. 

Taival, Alf. 
Tamlsar, P. 
Tandberg, Einar 
Thom, Ed. 
Tliomas, Frank 
Tliomason, Olaf 
Thompsen. Jack 

Van Fleet, F. B. 
Van Reen, T. R. A. 
Vander, Klitt J. J. 
Vaughan, A. S. 
Venquirst, E. 

Wallenstrand 
Warjo, J. 
Weelen, Theodorus 
Weijola, Arturi 
Westerlund, Albert 
Wickstrom. Axel 
Wlckstrom, J. A. 



Strom, Fred 
Sundberg, F. F. 
S\indburg, C. 
Sutsie, M. 
Svendsen, Geo. E. 
Svensen, Anker 
Swanson, Oscar 
Swanson, S. 
Sweeney, D. 
Swenson, E. 

Tliompson, C. 
Tlbbitts, P. 
Toffrl, A. 
Tom, W. 
Torrance, John 
Tuominen. Kaarlo 
Tyrrell, James 

Victor, J. 
Vltol, A. 
Vihavainen, Geo. 
Von Mahren, E. 
V'izcaino, F. 

Winkel, August 
Wiseman. C. 
Wilenius. Peter 
Williams, Charley 
Wind, Jacob 
Wrelljan, Joseph 



PACKAGES. 



Abhors, Ame 
Benson, Fred 
Egan, John 
Flood, Alex. 
Goodmans, G. 
Gunderson, Ole 
Highland. D. 
Hobbs, F. 
Irmey, Fred 
Jewett, Chas. 



Johansen, S. R. 
Johaneson, K. 
Long. C. 
MacDonnell, W. 
Mayes, J. B. 
Monroe. A. J. 
Olsen, H. 
Olsen, Ole 
Olaon, Knut 
Overwlck, ThOB. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Members of the crew of the SS. 
"Gulf of Mexico" may obtain money 
due them for salvage services ren- 
dered to the bark "Portugal" by 
communicating with Silas B. Axtell, 
Attorney for Seamen's Unions, 1 
Broadway, Room J, New York City. 



Charles L. Carlsen, No. 1834, who 
disappeared from the barge "Isaac 
Reed" at Eureka, California, on De- 
cember 31, 1918, is inquired for by 
his wife, Mrs. C. L. Carlsen, 107 
Courtland Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



Members of the crew of the SS. 
"Kellogg" who were on board when 
she picked up the SS. "Catania" can 
obtain money due them for salvage 
services by communicating with Silas 
B. Axtell, Attorney for Seamen's 
Unions, 1 Broadway, Room J, New 
York City. 10-16-18 



Members of the crew of the SS. 
"Munrio" who were on board said 
vessel at the time she salved the SS. 
"Curytibia" in the month of January, 
1918, and who have not yet received 
their full share of the salvage award, 
will kindly communicate with or call 
on Silas B. Axtell, 1 Broadway, New 
York City. 10-23-18 

Phone Kearny 5361 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 

Opposite Southern Pacific BIdg. 

60 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Walt, by the Lateat Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
WE USE ONLY THK BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 



CHRISTENSEN'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Established 1906 

CAPT. C. EHLERS, Superintendent 
257 Hansford Bldg 
268 Market Street 

The pupils of this well known school 
are taught all up-to-date requirements 
for passing a successful examination 
before the United States Steamboat 
Inspection Service. 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Kearny 5132 

East Street Tailors 

GENERAL OUTFITTER 

Altering done at moderate prices 

209 East Street, nr. Wasliington 

San Francisco 

H. LEVERIDGE 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 to 50 cents per day, 
Dr $2 to $3.00 per week, with all niod- 
ern conveniences. Free Hot and Cold 
Shower Baths on every floor. Elevator 
Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 

HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office. Franklin 7758 

Res.. Randolph 27 
Offlce Hours. 9 a. m. to 5;30 p. m. and 
7;30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m, to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market. 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goodi 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices •• :: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence. 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone. Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



LOOK 

For the Name and the Number 

GEO. A. PRICE 

19 East Street, San Francisco 

U S Navy Tower's 

Sea Boots Flannels Oil Skins 

SEAMEN— OUTFITTER— FISHERMEN 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



^<earny 3863 



JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 

Uniforms, Caps, Hat*, Sheet 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room 
— at — 
212 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Dougia* 5348 



Reliable Tailor 

Up-to-date Cloths at Popular 
Prices. All work guaranteed. 

TOM WILLIAMS 

28 SACRAMENTO STREET 

Near Market 

Special Inducements to Seafaring Trade 

SUITS STEAM PRESSED, 50 Cts. 

The only way: no burninK of 
garments. 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 



716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 



UNION MADE 
IN OUR OWN SHOP 

Represented by 

E, PEGUILLAN 




SUITS AND 
OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 
Prices 



Newt from Abroad 



ARE YOUR LIBERTY BONDS SAFE 

Bring or send them for safekeeping to this Savings 
and Commercial Bank and open a 
_, V LIBERTY BONDS SAVINGS ACCOUNT 

^^^^P^l^'^^^ ^^ ^'^^ ^^^^ '^^^^ °^ ^°^^ Liberty Bonds for you 
^-s==;=^ free of charge. Our folder 

"What Shall I Do With Them" '^SS:'.^\::TtlJ^iX. 

Anglo-California Trust Company Bank 




"THE PERSONAL SERVICE BANK" 
Market and Sansome Streets 
Sixteenth and Mission Streets 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO SEAFARING MEN 



Fillmore and Geary Streets 
Third and Twentieth Streets 



UTTMARK'S NAUTICAL ACADEMY 

(Established 1882) 
CAPTAIN F. E. UTTMARK, Principal 



8 State Street 
New York, N. Y. 



30 India Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR MASTERS', MATES' AND 
PILOTS' EXAMINATION 

Our ACADEMY is recognized as tlie oldest and best equipped NAVIGATION 

SCHOOL in the United States and is up to date in every respect. For 

full information call at school or write. Catalog sent free on request. 

"UTTMARK'S FOR NAVIGATION" 




Named Shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factorie* 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET. BOSTON. MASS. 
Collis Lovely, Gen. Pres. C>y'm. L. Baine, Sec -Tress. 



£>>Jj'.,0HOFUNntDt!^ 
,frf^"cn TTDRlNHWo»,ff »7»Q>y 




Ask for this Label 
on Beer 



INT'L UNION OF 
UNITED BREWERY and 
SOFT DRINK WORKERS 

OF AMERICA 
Asks you to write and speak to your 



Ask for this Label 
on Soft Drinks 




JACOB PETERSEN ib SON 
Proprietor* / 

Established 1880 

AFE 
ALAMEDA ^"^"^^ 

Coffee ap , u 

yjnch House 

.RKET STREE' 

7 y and 

STEUART STREE' 

' SAN Fi ?*NrT«ro _ 




STATE ASSEMBLYMEN AND STATE SENATORS 

TO 

WORK AND VOTE 

Against the Ratification of the National Prohibition Amendment 
to the Constitution 



Tt is reported from War.snw that 
40,000 Polish Jews have asked i/cr- 
niission to emigrate to America. 

Viscount Grey, former British Sec- 
retary of State for Foreign Affair.s, 
has agreed to represent the British 
Government at Washington pending 
the appointment of a permanent am- 
bassador. 

The Belgian Minister of Food has 
bought all the American supplies in 
Belgium. They were valued at 100,- 
000,000 francs ($20,000,000). The 
supplies will be retailed under gov- 
ernment control. 

The principal railways of Denmark 
are owned and operated by the Gov- 
ernment. The length of the Govern- 
ment roads is 2,103 kilometers (1,307 
miles) and that of the several pri- 
vate roads is 2,067 kilometers (1,284 
miles). 

An official report says that receipts 
if the Japanese Government rail- 
ways during the month of June last 
amounted to 7,058,848 yen, represent- 
ing an increase of 1,950,488 yen as 
compared with the corresponding 
period last year. 

The Postmaster-General of Canada 
has issued 10,000 stamps of a special 
design for mail to be carried into the 
United States by airplane during the 
international race, August 25, for the 
Commodore Hotel $10,000 prize and 
three trophies. 

A business of more than $57,000,- 
000 was done by the live principal 
co-operative societies of Finland dur- 
ing 1918, according to the consul 
at Helsingfors. The total capital is 
$4,510,894, and the year's profits 
amounted to $1,406,793. 

The House of Commons has 
adopted an amendment to the Prof- 
iteering bill empowering the Board 
of Trade to fix wholesale and retail 
prices. An amendment seeking to in- 
clude profiteering in rentals within 
the scope of the bill was rejected. 

A series of tramway lines, 9^ 
miles long, will be constructed in 
Kowloon and operated by the Gov- 
ernment of Hongkong, unless private 
interests can be found who are will- 
ing to conduct the enterprise upon 
terms satisfactory to the colonial 
authorities. 

What promises to be the biggest 
repatriation scheme in the world is 
being launched by the Queensland 
labor government in Australia. A 
large area of land is to be thrown 
open and four railways constructed 
to open up 2,500,000 acres of rich 
and fertile land to returned soldiers. 
In a speech on the railroad situa- 
tion in Germany the Prussian Min- 
ister of f'ublic Works said that in 
the las-' financial year there was a 
worki-^g loss on the Prussian rail- 
w,-!y.< of 2,403,000,000 marks, while at 
present the railways have a daily 
deficit of 10,000.000 marks. Passen- 
ger traffic has shrunk to 15 per cent, 
of the peace tinif^ traffic, an<J express 
trains to ^ '"^^ '"^"'- "* '''^ pre-war 

l>ritish expenditures for naval and 
military operations in Russia from 
the date of the armistice until the 
end of July amounted to £7(),000,00(), 
according to an official "White Pa- 
per" issued on the 14th. In its com- 
ment the London Daily News says: 
"It has been entered upon by the 
Cabinet and War Office without Par- 
liamentary sanction or even discus- 
sion. . . . This immense expendi- 
ture already approaches half the total 
cost of the South African war." 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the WiU 



Wicked, But Human. — Comfortably 
Cool Vacationist— Gosh! I hope it's 
good and hot in the city! — Life. 



Cross-Patches. — So you called on 
her to patch up your old quarrel. 
Did you succeed? 

No, we found it easier to make a 
new one. — Boston Transcript. 



Setting Was the Word.— "Those 
women have been setting there for 
an hour or more." 

"You shouldn't say 'setting,' my 
dear. It is 'sitting.' " 

"No, 'setting' is what I meant. I 
think they're hatching out trouble 
for somebody."— Detroit Free Pres? 



Rewarded. — A venerable justice sat 
in the place of honor at a reception. 
As a young lady of dazzling charms 
walked past he exclaimed almost in- 
voluntarily: "What a beautiful girl!" 

The young woman overheard the 
justice's compliment, turned and gave 
him a radiant smile. "What an ex- 
cellent judge!" she said.— Pittsburgh 
Chronicle-Telegraph. 



William J. Bryan says he is against 
the man who treats intoxication as a 
joke. "I mean men like a clubman 
I once met in Atlanta," he continued. 
"This clubman and a party were just 
leaving the club when the footman 
who preceded them tripped on the 
steps and rolled clear down to the 
sidewalk. As he picked himself up, 
the rounder poked him in the ribs 
and cried: 'William, you must be 
more careful in future. Don't you 
realize that if you make a practice 
of going downstairs that way people 
will begin to think you really belong 
to the club?'" 



Mrs. Charles Scribner, Jr., who 
recently stopped a runaway li^rse at 
Lennox, Massachusetts, and by so 
doing saved the lives of several 
school children, tells the story of a 
Scotch mechanic who worked about 
the hangar of an aviator friend of 
hers. The flyer finally persuaded 
Sandy to take a ride with him, but 
after a few moments in air Sandy 
shouted that he wanted to get back 
to earth again. "Nonsense," retorted 
the aviator. "Why, man, I was just 
about to do a loop the loop." "For 
heaven sakes, don't," wailed Sandy. I 
"I hae some siller in ma pocket an' 
it might fall oot." 



The James H. 
Barry Co, 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRAWCISCO 

Children's Accounts 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHT SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to Illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education requirtd of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




[ch 

Yo 



Your children should be taught to 
save Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe in a savings account. 

They cannot start toff soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

7S3 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
8AN FRANCISCO 



HORACE R. TAYLOR 



HENRY TAYLOR 



TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

510 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

IMPORTERS OF NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

LORD KELVIN'S and WHYTE THOMSON'S 
Comi)asses, Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sound- 
ing Machines, Sextants, Parallel Rulers, Pelorus Di- 
viders and Nautical Books of Every description. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 
1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 



J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 



72 EAST STREET 



Opposite Ferry Post Office 



Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When Yau Buy 
from Us, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted tor Cash. 



Diamonds 
Watches 



Phona Douglaa tTM 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
OrlvlnaJ glia 




SOLID GOLD tl.SO 
GOLD FILLED .50 



64 MARKET STREET 



High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



FACTORY TO WEARER 



SEAMEN--When in Port- BE SURE 

You see the most complete line of 

UNION LABEL SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS IN THE U. S. A. 

Sold Direct to You at Manufacturer's Prices 



QtGLESON & CO, 




1118 Market St. 

San Francisco 
717 K St., near Postoffice 

Sacramento 
112-116 S. Spring St. 

Los Angeles 



^ 



Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Silverware 

715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 

^elers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

1 'jpVck— Everything Marked in Plain Figures 

QameslSorensen FINE Wi^^^-^^''^^^ JEWELRY STORE 
^ »ftXj..«, AT?" REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 

' S Big Red Clock and the Chimes. 




Market at Fiith 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots. 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend, San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN! 
You Know M« 




I am 
"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll- try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats too. 

If you want your Panama blocked 

right. I'll do that. 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



ID SEAL CKAI CO^ NANUrAaUKEIS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phon* Douglas 1M0 



CJHfiBosr'EH 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



Si 






FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
OfiBcial Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXIII, No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1919. 



Whole No. 2556. 



PROGRESS THROUGH DEMOCRACY 

Majority Rule the Only "Boss" of American Trade Unions 



The clear trade-union view of American 
Labor's attitude toward the burning issues 
of the day has just been presented in an 
address by John P. Frey of the Inter- 
national Molders' Union. 

Brother Frey has had exceptional oppor- 
tunities for observation and study of the 
labor movement abroad. He was in 
Europe on several occasions as an official 
representative of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor. 

The address of Brother Frey was 
selected for publication in the Journal 
from a wealth of available material. It 
was, however, chosen upon merit only 
and is earnestly recommended to careful 
perusal. 



What the workers of America have in mind 
for the immediate future is the establishing 
of a condition in mduslry under which the 
workers will have a voice in determining the 
terms of employment and conditions of labor, 
a power which they will exercise in industry 
equivalent to that which they exercise as 
citizens in determining the laws of the land 
under which they shall live. 

If the workers are to enjoy the full rights 
of democratic institutions, there must be an 
end to the arbitrary determination of terms 
of employment and conditions of labor by the 
employe. 

No employer is so good and so wise that 
there can be placed in his hands with safety 
the power of determining the terms of employ- 
ment and conditions of labor, for these directly 
determine the workers' standard of living, 
which in turn determine the degree of civiliza- 
tion which is to exist, and this is too great 
a subject to be entrusted to any one man or 
small group of men. Those whose standard 
of living is determined by the wage rate 
and conditions of labor must have a voice in 
determining what these shall be. 

We cannot safely trust the adjustment of 
these industrial problems to the Government, 
for it is a problem which no government can 
solve. We cannot trust it to the mass of 
the employers, for the natural tendency would 
he for them to be governed by selfish interests. 
We cannot expect that the trade-union move- 
ment by itself alone can solve the problem 
presented. If it is solved it must be through 
the same method by which the American pub- 
lic solved the great problems that have con- 
fronted our citizens since we became a nation. 
It can only be solved through the application 
of the methods of democracy; the meeting 
together of men's minds; the joint consideration 
of the problems presented by those who are 
directly interested, and their joint judgment. 

Where organized bodies of employers, directly 
or througli their chosen representatives, meet 



with the representatives of organized labor for 
the purpose of considering their differences, 
there is established the democratic machinery 
through which their particular industrial prob- 
lems can be adjusted. For too long organized 
employers have been meeting by themselves 
and considering their industrial problems with- 
out the presence of representatives of organized 
labor. As a result they have secured definite 
understandings of some of their immediate 
needs, but they have in most instances utterly 
failed to understand the necessities, to say 
nothing of the rights and privileges, of those 
who were in their employ. 

The chasm which divides employers and 
lalior to-day must he bridged, so that both 
ma»nagement and labor can each pass over 
to the other side. The opportunity must 
be afforded through which labor will be given 
the unquestioned riglit to a voice in estab- 
lishing those conditions in industry which so 
vitally afTect the worker's life and determine 
the community's standard of living. 

Previous to the war many employers had 
learned that the methods of joint conference 
with representatives of the workmen was not 
only just, not only beneficial, but advantageous 
to all concerned. But there exis.ted in our coun- 
try powerful organizations of employers who 
believed that the worker must be prevented 
from organizing, must be prevented from exer- 
cising any influence in determining the terms 
of employment, the conditions of labor, and 
tlie shop rules and regulations. A large 
portion of the public press responded readily 
to . the influence of these associations. They 
failed to see the irresistible logic which pre- 
sented itself under a condition where employers 
organized for the purpose of denying the 
right of organization to their employees. If 
organization was free to employers, the exer- 
cise of the same right could not be denied 
to workmen who were citizens of a free nation. 

These associations of employers, controlled 
by the same autocratic spirit which dominated 
the rulers of the Central Powers, organized 
elaborate machinery to prevent the growth 
of trade-unionism. In many cases legislatures 
and our courts proved of assistance to them 
in their efforts. They organized elaborate 
machinery to prevent trade-union growth. They 
employed the spy to carry on his contemptible 
work. Their activities gave opportunity for 
the springing up of so-called private detective 
agencies, whose principal purpose was to serve 
as strike-breakers and barriers against trade- 
union development. 

But in spite of their efforts, the principles 
of justice, of democracy, of Americanism, were 
so firmly imbedded in the American worker's 
mind that trade-unionism made progress. 

Then came the war. and with it the necessity 
for labor's co-operation, not only upon the 
hattlefiold, hut in the enormous plants whore 
the manufacture of munitions was as essential 
as the training of soldiers. 

The Government of the United .States 
announced that Labor's rights must be protected 
during the war; that labor had a right to a 



voice in determining the terms of employ- 
ment and the conditions of labor; that the 
American worker's standard of living must not 
be lowered; and during the war trade-unionism 
made successful progress. With the signing 
of the armistice came reports of radical labor 
movements in Europe, and particularly in 
Russia. The seeds of Bolshevism had been 
scattered broadcast, and to some extent had 
crossed the Atlantic; and suddenly many of 
these autocratic union-hating employers, seeing 
the destruction which lay in the wake of 
Bolshevism, believed it advisable to choose 
between the lesser of two evils, and grudgingly 
granted recognition to trade-unionism as a 
method of forestalling industrial revolution. 

But the American trade-union movement is 
not revolutionary. It has not believed that 
any permanent gains are to be secured through 
tearing down. It is constructive. It believes 
in building solidly. It is convinced that the 
oak which grows from the acorn cannot sprout 
and develop its strength within a single season. 
It places its hope in education, in evolution, 
in the methods of democracy. 

The American trade-union movement repudi- 
ated the revolutionary programs advocated in 
some portions of Europe, and what has been 
the result? One with which we have to reckon 
to-day is the fact that many employers, finding 
that_ the American trade-union movement had 
set its face against revolutionary methods, lost 
their fear of a radical movement in America, 
and instead of supporting the American trade- 
union movement in its thoroughly American 
position, they set about reviving the old arbi- 
trary, autocratic, anti-trade union policies of 
the past. We see 4 striking illustration of this 
in the steel industry — an industry which could 
not have reached its present degree of develop- 
ment without organization, and which to-day 
denies the right of organization to its employes, 
and through its influence with municipal author- 
ities has even denied its workers the oppor- 
tunity to attend meetings where the question 
of organization along trade-union lines could 
be considered. 

There is no place in the American trade- 
union movement for the revolutionist; and there 
is no place in America for the autocratic 
employer of labor. 

The employer who assumes a position that 
his is to be the only voice in determining 
terms of employment, is as dangerous as the 
man who preaches violence and who applies 
the torch and throws the bomb. 

V 'e are entering into the most trying period 
of^our industrial history. The cost of living 
has become an. almost insurmountable problem. 
.If enters into every worker's home. The 
advances in wages which the American workers 
have secured have not kept pace with the 
increase in the cost of the necessities of 
life. There exists bitter dissatisfaction in many 
quarters. New doctrines are being preached 
by extreme radicals, and old doctrines in a 
new dress. These radicals are not confined 
to the ranks of labor; they arc not con- 
n-.ed to reformers who desire to see the world, 



T.HE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



as a whole, made better. They are found 
in the ranks of the employers as well as in 
the ranks of labor. 

The American trade-union movement has 
endeavored through its experiences of the past 
to prepare a program for its guidance in the 
future. It has adopted a reconstruction pro- 
gram which, when placed into operation, will 
give every citizen, workman or otherwise, 
a fair opportunity of securini; a just measure 
of reward for his contribution to the welfare 
of society; which will give to the worker a 
more just share of the wealth which his labor 
has created. 

It is a comprehensive program. It embraces 
a consideration of the main problems which 
confront the American worker. It is based 
throughout ujion the principles of democracy. 
In its general features it cannot help but secure 
the approval of every fair-minded American. 

We intend to place this program into effect. 
We intend to continue the organization of the 
unorganized. We intend to build up our 
unions so that their members are responsible 
to the laws of their organizations and the 
American principles upon which they are 
founded. 

We face the future with confidence, for our 
movement passed beyond the stages of experi- 
ment many years ago. The problems which 
face us to-day will be solved. The measure of 
justice which we demand will be secured. The 
methods which we advocate, and which have 
been so successfully applied in the past, will 
be applied in the future, and the trade-union 
movement will make this country a better 
place to live in. The American trade-union 
movement will make our institutions a guiding 
star for the workers of other lands. But while 
we arc working out our problems in the indus- 
tries, while we are overcoming the injustices 
which exist, we must ever bear in mind the 
influence which the public attitude will have 
upon our success. 

Confidence Has Been Gained 

As trade-unionists we are but a part of the 
community — a part of the citizenship of our 
country. We must have the moral support of 
those who are not in industry, if the greatest 
measure of success is to be ours. 

We do not fear this public. We have no 
reason to fear it. The American public to-day 
by an overwhelming majority has given us 
its expressions of confidence, and we must 
bear in mind in all that we do that this 
public support is essential in the future. 

There is nothing which our trade-union need 
fear so much as a condition which would lead 
the public to fear us. 

We must bear in mind that the real strength 
of our trade-union movement does not lie in 
numbers. Numbers may mean weakness as 
well as strength. Our numbers only count 
for effectiveness so long as we are unitedly 
acting in a good cause. A million trade- 
unionists influenced by divided or unwise coun- 
sels would not have the effectiveness of a 
hundred thousand workers thoroughly united 
in a good cause. 

It is not enough that we should adopt sound 
policies for the government of our movement, 
the important thing is that these policies should 
be carried into effect. 

We will be judged not by what we "Say, or 
by what we profess, but by what we do. 
We cannot be unreasonable in our methods 
and have the public believe that we are 
reasonable. 

We cannot be unfair in our dealings with 
employers and have them believe that we are 
fair. Our advocacy of the methods of concilia- 
tion, negotiation and trade agreements will not 
enable us to deal successfully with employers 
if, in our actual relations with them, we are 
not loyal to the agreements we have entered 
into. 

We cannot expect that the employers and 
the public should have respect for the trade- 
union regulations which we enact for our self- 
government if we fail to observe these laws 
ourselves. 

If we are to hold public confidence, our 
pledged word to an agreement must be as 
sacred to us as our honor. Nothing can 
be more disastrous to our welfare than the 
failure on our part to carry out all of the 
provisions of any agreement which we entered 
into with employers. 

There has lately developed in America, 
largely as a result of a world-wide unrest, 
a re-birth of the old attitude on the part of 
some wage-earners that the end justifies the 
means. 

Holding ideas which are not held by the 
mass of trade-unionists, believing in policies 
whicji run counter to those adopted by the 
American Federation of Labor, they have 
divided the ranks of labor in. some localities 
by launching new movements, by endeavor- 
ing to "establish the industrial form of organiza- 
tion advocated by those who believe in one 
big union. Those who have participated m 
these movements are seemingly not aware that 
secession and dual organization will never 
solve the industrial problem. 

These men are unwilling to be governed 
by the rule of the majority. They do not 



believe in majority rule unless they can have 
their own waj'. 

The Government of the United States is based 
upon the rule of majority, the government 
of the American trade-union movement is based 
upon the rule of majority. Both are democ- 
racies. Those who refuse to be governed by 
this rule, those who launch new movements, 
whether understandingly or not, are doing 
more to weaken the effectiveness of trade- 
unionism than all of the non-unionists and 
all of the strikebreakers and all of the antag- 
onistic associations of employers combmed. 

The welfare of our country demands that 
there should be co-operation between employer 
and workman. But there can be no co-opera- 
tion unless there is confidence, and there 
can be no confidence unless the methods of 
democracy arc applied by employers and work- 
ers alike in the solution of the industrial prob- 
lems which arise over the relationship of 
employer and employe. 

In the methods of democracy we see the 
only hope for the future. We fought to make 
the world safe for democracy. Now that the 
glorious victory has been won, we will be 
negligent of our duties and our traditions if 
we hesitate in our determination to apply the 
])rinciples and methods of democracy to the 
industrial relationship. Autocracy in govern- 
ment is dead; autocracy in American industries 
cannot and must not be permitted to exist. 



NEWS WRITERS ORGANIZE. 



The News Writers' Union of San Fran- 
cisco, which was organized on August 24, 
enters the fourth week of its existence with 
a membership roll comprising 80 per cent, 
of the news writers of San Francisco, Oak- 
land, r.erkeley and Alameda. 

On yXugust 24, when the writers held 
their first meeting and signed the member- 
ship roll, the newspaper publishers took 
note of the organization by discharging 
nine members from the staffs of the two 
morning newsiiajiers of San Francisco. Five 
men were discharged from the Examiiiv:r 
and four from the Chronicle. No demands 
had been made of the publishers : the men 
were discharged merely for exercising their 
right to organize. 

Four of the dismissed men recently re- 
ceived their honorable discharge from the 
military service of the United States. After 
fighting to make the world safe for de- 
mocracy, they found that the publishers. 
Mr. William Randolph Hearst and Mr. M. 
II. Dc Young denied them the elementary 
democratic right of organization. Mr. De 
Young's pai)er, the Chronicle, daily carries 
across its front page the statement: "This 
Newspaper is 100'/<. American." Mr. Hearst 
is the well advertised "friend of the work- 
ingman." 

The Golden Gate cha])ter of the Ameri- 
can Uegion sent a communication to Mr. 
Hearst and Mr. De Young protesting the 
discharge of the service men and asking for 
tlieir reinstatement. Part of the ccjin- 
munication follows: 

"The American Legion is vitally con- 
cerned in all matters concerning the wel- 
fare of those who fought for their country 
in the world war, this organization being 
composed of veterans of that war. We arc 
particularly interested in the employment 
of those men and to see that every ex- 
service man is afforded every opportunity 
to rehabilitate himself in civilian life. 

"We also recognize the right of men and 
women to an organization for their pro- 
tective benefit, a right which your paper 
has consistently advocated, and we are 
grieved to think that that was the reason 
for their discharge." 

A committee from the San Francisco 
Labor Council visited the editors of the 
Examiner and Chronicle and requested the 
reinstatement of the discharged men. The 
editors denied that the 'men had been dis- 



charged because they joined an organiza- 
tion and they furthermore denied that they 
knew of the existence of the News Writers' 
I'nion. .\s the representatives of the pub- 
lishers under whose immediate authoiity 
the men were discharged were present at 
the meeting, the obvious conclusion is that 
the publishers are afraid to let their acts 
be known to the public. 

With one exception, the newspapers of 
San Francisco and the bay cities have made 
no mention of the News Writers' Union 
in iheir columns. The organization of the 
news writers probably is of as great pub- 
lic interest as the organization of actors 
and college professors, both of which pro- 
fessions have received a good deal of press 
notice in their recent organizing move- 
ments. But in these cases the interests ol 
the publishers are not directly concerned. 

The evening newspapers of San Fran- 
cisco and the papers of the other bay 
cities are so well organized that the i)ub 
lishcrs of these pajiers have not discharged 
any members of the stafYs. Efforts on the 
l)art of the publishers to bring non-union 
writers from Los Angeles and other cities 
iia'.'c been unsuccessful. 

The San Francisco News Writers' Union 
has come to take its permanent stand 
with other bodies of organized labor under 
the banner of the American Federation of 
Labor. The efforts of the union will be 
directed towards putting the profession 
of journalism on a higher ethical and 
working basis. 



JAPAN IN CHINA. 



"It simply means that if Japan's over- 
flowing population, now increasing at the 
rate of 1,000,000 per year, is to be kept out 
of Canada, America, and Australia, they 
cannot be kept out of China as well. . . 
The white races are not going to have it 
both ways," so Dr. J. Ingram Bryant, writ- 
ing from Tokio for the Sydney Herald, puts 
the case for Japan's claim to suzerain rights 
in China. But what that portion of the 
white races most concerned desires is not 
that Japanese should be kept out of China, 
but that they should be restrained from 
exercising governing powers there. Prac- 
tical annexation of parts of China does 
wrong to that country's peaceful ])eopIe, 
and there is no morality in the jdea that 
by sanctioning it the white race saves itself 
trouble. — The Australian Worker. 



The trade union movement has a destiny 
just as great and as inijjortant as the des- 
tiny of our ])olitical government. How- 
ever, in this resi)ect the trade unions are 
neither narrow or limited ; as a matter of 
fact, their si)here of usefulness and activ- 
itv is nine times greater and more impor- 
tant and far reaching, than are the activi- 
ties and pur])oses of the political state. 
After all the material well-being and good 
condition, insofar as wages, hours, and 
working" conditions of the masses is con- 
cerned, is of paramount importance. A 
political state, though it be the freest on 
earth, cannot properly care for the working 
conditions of the masses; that duty and ob- 
ligation must be left now and for all time 
to the v.'orkers themselves, to our economic 
or trade organization. If this policy is 
adhered to it will lead straight to indus- 
trial democracy, justice, and freedom. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



k 



Why Intervention — Also for Whom? 

War with Mexico is in the minds of 
those persons who have had war in their 
minds for years. These persons have tried 
by every subtle device known to the most 
cunning members of the human family to 
involve the United States and Mexico in 
a conflict at arms. During the great war 
the "interventionists" agitation was sub- 
dued but not destroyed. It required only 
the opportune moment to blossom forth 
again with greater vigor and viciousness. 
The ink was scarcely dry on the armistice 
before these "interventionists" were at it 
again. Those senators who made them- 
selves conspicuous in the past as advocates 
of intervention immediately again took up 
the cudgels and, as if by magic, there 
came flocking to their support that host 
of intervention fry which creeps out like 
sand flies when trouble hoists its signal 
over the southern horizon. Are the taking 
of life and the spilling of human blood 
never to cease? 

Working people of America know of no 
reason for a quarrel with Mexico. The 
working people of Mexico declare they 
know of no cause for a quarrel with the 
United States. 

To be sure, the "interventionists" bring 
forth lists of Americans who have been 
killed in Mexico and because of this declare 
solemnly and profoundly that there should 
be intervention by our government. Inter- 
vention is what they call it — war is what 
they mean. Not a war of defense but of 
aggression. Not a war to save life but 
to grasp property and wealth. 

No inquiry has yet revealed anything 
of a character of sufficient gravity to war- 
rant the people of our country to enter 
into a bloody and brutal contest with the 
people of Mexico. It is' well that Con- 
gress has undertaken to make an inquiry. 
Let us hope that it shall be for the pur- 
pose of bringing about an amicable settle- 
ment. 

On former occasions the labor move- 
ments of the United States and Mexico 
were compelled to join forces to check 
the mad rush of militarists and of indus- 
trial, commercial and finan>^ial pirates. 
This they stand ready to do again. The 
organized working people of the two 
nations understand each other better than 
ever heretofore. Moreover they under- 
stand better and more fully the forces in 
their own countries that are inimical to 
the welfare of both countries. They are 
determined to resist the encroachments 
of such forces and with all their strength 
and influence to struggle against them. 

The world has had altogether too much 
war to want more war just for the fun of 
it or for the selfish gain of a few. The 
world has had too much war to want 
more war just to satisfy private grievances 
or gratify personal lust. The world has 
had top much war to want more war for 
any reason except to sustain and maintain 
fundamental rights involving the basic 
liberties of peoples when those rights 
can not be promoted or protected in any 
other way. 



Too plainly does the pudgy figure of 
greed stalk behind this talk of intervention 
— far too plainly for the rank and file of 
American life. There is wealth untold in 
Mexico, wealth in oil and minerals and 
fine timber. This greed of the pudgy 
figure has long been known to the people 
of Mexico — and, in truth, to a lesser 
degree, through all Latin-America. Just 
as greed has exerted its influence on 
American public opinion, so have reckless 
agitators to the south seized upon it to 
spread dislike of America, magnifying it 
and giving it a significance far above 
and beyond its actual importance. 

American labor has worked hard to 
dispel the idea from the minds of our 
neighbor American republics that this 
pudgy figure in our society represents true 
and liberal America. Labor has worked 
assiduously to create a sentiment of fra- 
ternity, a spirit of unity of purpose and a 
conception of community of interest. 

The American workers' answer to these 
jingoes, these interventionists, these stained 
reputations that crawl up from where 
slaves toil in bondage, is that there is not 
going to be a war between the L'nitcd 
States and Mexico for the benefit and 
gratification of these national and inter- 
national avaricious human parasites. — 
American Federationist. 



Typhoid Is Preventable. 

About 25,000 ])ersons die of typhoid fever 
in this country every year, and this dis- 
ease is ])reventable, says the United States 
Public Health Service. 

Ty])hoid fever is described as a serious, 
contagious, infectious disease, lasting from 
four to eight weeks or longer. There are 
often serious complications, such as ulcers, 
hemorrhage or perforation of the bowels, 
and in about one out of every ten cases 
the patient dies. 

The fever is referred to as a "filth" dis- 
ease, and is caused by swallowing typhoid 
germs, which have come fro^n the dis- 
charges of a person who is ill with typhoid 
or who has recovered and who continues 
to discharge the germs. Infected water, 
milk, food, dirty fingers and filthy flies 
often spread the disease. 

It is stated that typhoid fever can 
be prevented by good sanitation, personal 
cleanliness and tyi)hoid vaccination. This 
vaccination, says the Public Health Serv- 
ice, afifords a protection from one to four 
years, sometimes longer. There is "abso- 
lutelv no risk and no danger." 



Pacific Mail Is Alive. 

The public will be pleased to know that 
the Pacific Mail Steamshij) Company is 
very much alive, despite the claim that the 
Seamen's law has driven it ofi^ the high 
seas. 

Organized seamen have insisted that the 
Pacific Mail departed from the Pacific 
Ocean during the war because of the de- 
mand for ships on the Atlantic. 

Opi)onents of the Seamen's law will 
continue their claim and quietly ignore 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia, 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Pahnerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Internationale Transi)ortarbeiter - Federation, 
Iingelufcr, 18, Berlin S. O. 16, Ciermany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev Wedels 
plads 5, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundt, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten IB., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsclie Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tcnburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Xederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhavn 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Xationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Geneva, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
.Sociedad Carboncros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 
BRAZIL. 
Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
r^arao de Sav Feli.x 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Socicdada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo des Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Bcnedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Worker* 



Labor has started its fight to gain 
control of Winnipeg "by constitu- i 
tional methods." The Dominion 
Labor Party has completed the or- 
ganization of ward committees, the 
initial step toward placing men of 
labor sympathies in the City Coun- 
cil as aldermen. 

One of the most discussed ques- 
tions of the time in Spanish labor 
and economic circles, is the prac- 
ticability of establishing an indus- 
trial parliament that would seek the 
assistance of the working classes in 
governing or in the settlement of 
any of the difficulties with which 
Spain is afllicted. 

The Russian Co-operator says that 
W. Maisky, well known Russian 
writer on social and economic ques- 
tions, a young man of great value 
to the co-operative movement, known 
in the English speaking world 
through his articles in the Russian 
Co-operator, was taken out of prison 
at Omsk, driven outside of the town 
and shot by the officers of Kolchak. 

Compulsory recogntion of the right 
of collective bargaining is the French 
metal workers' slogan, since the fail- 
ure of their recent strike. The metal 
employers refuse to recognize the 
union, although the French law of 
1884 declares labor organizations arc 
"legal." This law has never been 
enforced by the government, and 
the unions have been forced to se- 
cure a statutory right by economic 
organi?:ation. Since the metal work- 
ers lost their strike, several weeks 
ago, the employers have been in- 
dulging in wholesale victimization. 

The total number of persons in 
receipt of unemployment donation in 
Great Britain on August 1 was 553,- 
482. The composition of this total 
girls 6.176; (b) Demobilized— Met' 
100,228, boys 6,529, women 73,878, 
girls 6,176; (b) Demobilised— Men 
364,570, women 2,101. Of the total 
number of civilians 51,194 were in 
receipt of the reduced donation paid 
after the expiry of the first period 
of 13 weeks' unemployment. The 
number of men on the Live Regis- 
ters of the Employment Exchanges 
on August 1 was 517,443, or an in- 
crease of 1,180 on July 4; and the 
number of women was 149,464, or a 
decrease of 33,534 on the total on 
July 4. The number of vacancies 
unfilled on August 1 was 40,004 for 
men and 47,936 for women, the cor- 
responding figures for July 4 being 
44,904 and 55,289. 

Farm laborers in France are up 
in arms over the refusal of the 
French Parliament to include them 
in the recently-enacted eight-hour 
law. These workers charge that the 
Government listened to the organ- 
ized farm owners, who insist that 
an eight-hour day is "impracticable." 
The farm laborers are now extend- 
ing their organization and will ap- 
ply the shorter work day, regardless 
of the law. Other demands include 
a minimum wage, weekly rest day 
and inspection of labor and hygiene 
conditions. "In order to secure suf- 
ficient farm labor, the farmers must 
raise wages to the equivalent of th;it 
paid the industrial workers." runs 
the manifesto of the Agricultural 
Workers' Federation. "The applica- 
tion of the eight-hour day to agri- 
culture will not reduce the output, 
since it presupposes more scientific 
production and the use of farm ma- 
chinery." 



M. BROWN &t SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



S. G. SWANSON 

Establlshpil l'.>01 
For the BEST there is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE — S. G. Swanson is not connected 
with any dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2a Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

5291/2 BEACON STREET. SAN PEDRO. CAL. 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In 
the sunny south, is the ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Nav- 
igation School here and under his undivided personal supervision students 
will be thoroughly prepared to pass successfully before the United States 
Steamboat Inspectors. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



Attention, Look! 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 
SUITS and UNIFORMS 

made to order by expert tailors and designers. Best selection 
of imported and domestic woolens. 

Also ready-made Suits, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Trunks, Suit- 
Cases, Sailors' Canvas Bags, Oilskin Clothes, Rubber Boots, 
Bedding, Blankets and Toilet Articles. 

Slopchest Outfits, Wholesale. 



Free information 
of the movements 
of all vessels under 
every flag. 



Free use of read- 
ing, writing and 
rest room on the 
mezzanine floor. 



Macarthur's 

NAVIGATION LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES 

CAPT. CUGLE'S BOOK, SIMPLE RULES IN NAVI- 
GATION. THE BLUE BOOK OF FACTS, A HAND- 
BOOK FOR THE MARINE ENGINEER. 

Nautical Instruments 

CAPTAINS' LEATHER CARRYING-CASES FOR SHIP'S 
PAPERS. NAUTICAL ADVICE TO ALL 
PARTS OF THE GLOBE. 

Twelve years ago the smallest, to-day the largest, best 

equipped and cleanest exclusive seafaring men's 

store in the world. 

A visit to this store will convince you. 

CAPTAIN CHAS. J. SWANSON 

36 Steuart Street, near Market 

' In the Southern Pacific Building 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone Douglas 1082 



EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAidSEN. Prop. 



Sailors* Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING, SHOES. HATS. RUBBER 

AND OIL, CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 




DO YOU KNOW 

That War-Savings Stamps 
pay 4 per cent, compound in- 
terest? 

That W. S. S. cost $4.12 in 
Jcmuary and one cent more 
each succeeding month of the 
year, reaching their highest 
price, $4.23, in December? 

That the 1919 . W. S. S., 
known as the Franklin Issue, 
will be redeemed by the Gov- 
ernment on January 1, 1924, 
for five dollars? 

That the 1918 W. S. S. will 
be redeemed by the Govern- 
ment on January 1, 1923, for 
five dollars? 

That W. S. S. of either issue, 
if necessary, may be redeemed 
for value to date, as indicated 
on the W. S. S. Certificate, at 
any post office upon ten days' 
notice? 

That one thousand dollars' 
worth of W. S. S. is the maxi- 
mum amount allowed to any 
one purchaser? 

That Thrift Stamps cost 
twenty-five cents? And that 
sixteen Thrift Stamps are ex- 
changeable for an interest-bear- 
ing War- Savings Stamp? 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the whereabouts 
I of L. C. S. Admiraal, a member of 
I the Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Asso- 
ciation, last heard of in Rctterdam, 
Holland, 1914, will please notify his 
brother J. J. Admiraal, 51 South 
Street, New York, N. Y. 8-13-19 



Information wanted regarding John 
I Johnsen, native of Bergen, age 44, 
last heard from in New Orleans, 
1917, was then on schooner "Lizzie 
M. Parson," going to France. Any 
information will be appreciated by 
I his brother, Andrew Johnsen, Sail- 
ors' Union, Seattle, Wash. 8-20-19 



Will Ingwald Johnson, • Charles 
MoHer, and any other member of 
the crew of the S. S. "Chehalis," on 
January 29, 1919, when Otto Peter- 
son was injured, kindly report to the 
Secretary, Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, San Francisco, Cal. 8-13-19 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



ft 



Negotiations arc being carried on by the Pa- 
cific Steamship Company with the United States 
Shipping Board for the purchase of four steam- 
ers now engaged in the Portland-Oriental run 
of the Admiral Line.' Final completion of the 
deal will be made when the Government de- 
cides on its policy when it sells ships to private 
owners. 

Througli detective work on the part of in- 
spectors in Surveyor of Customs John S. _ Ir- 
by's office, opium valued at $6000 was seized 
during the week aboard the steamer Shinyo 
Maru, which arrived at San Francisco on Sep- 
tember 9 from the Orient. Inspectors Ben 
Schneider and Francis Boland detected a loose 
panel in one of the 200 first-class cabins. Be- 
hind the panel, between the joints and the iron 
frame of the ship were found twenty large cans 
of opium. Irby is conducting an investigation 
among the crew. No arrests have so far been 
made. 

Flying the Stars and Stripes and in command 
of an American Naval officer, the UB 88, a for- 
mer German submarine, entered San Francisco 
harbor during the past week. The people of the 
bay cities will be given every opportunity to in- 
spect the former undersea terror. This an- 
nouncement was made by Lieutenant-Com- 
mander J. L. Neilson, who brought the craft 
to anchor in man-o'-war row, ofif Mission street. 
The UB-88, has a record of destroying sixteen 
vessels in waters of the British Isles during the 
war. The boat will remain in San Francisco 
bay until September 28, when it will proceed to 
the Bremerton Navy yard. 

Executives of the Western district of the 
Supply and Sales Department of the Emergency 
Fleet Corporation are to hold a meeting at 
Portland to make final determination concerning 
the sale of all surplus property assembled on 
the Coast. C. O. Yoakum, general manager of 
the district, with W. R. Defield of Philadelphia, 
consulting engineer of the Emergency Fleet Cor- 
poration, have returned from San Francisco, 
after a general inspection of the concentration 
houses at Alameda. It is expected that inven- 
tories, now in progress of all surplus stocks will 
have been completed so that full reports can be 
made at the coming conference. 

The wood auxiliary motor vessels "Renown," 
"Robinda," "Balcutta," "Roobyalla," "Roorika," 
"Cethana," "Culburra," "Coolcha" and "Chal- 
lambra," owned by the Australian Government, 
are reported sold for about $3,000,000 in all, to 
American owners. The "Challambra," "Coolcha," 
"Cethana" and "Culburra," built by the Sloan 
Shipping Corp., in 1917 and 1918, are 2,341 tons 
gross, 1,788 net, dimensions 265.2 ft. by 46.3 ft. 
by 21.8 ft., and are equipped with 12 cylinder oil 
engines of the 4-stroke cycle, single acting type. 
The other vessels sold are now under construc- 
tion at the yards of the Patterson-MacDonald 
Ship Building Co., Seattle, Wash., and Sloan 
Shipping Corp., Olympia, Wash. 

San Francisco banks have made an arrange- 
ment' with the Board of State Harbor Commis- 
sioners to purchase $1,000,000 worth of harbor 
bonds, J. H. McCallum, president of the board, 
announced. The agreement with the bankers 
provides that the bonds will be taken over and 
paid for as the port may require. The rate of 
interest is 4^/2 per cent., but the State will not 
be obliged to pay any of the interest until a 
block of bonds is actually sold. The last harbor 
bond issue is for $10,000,000, of which one-fifth 
has been disposed of to date. McCallum also 
announced that the board had approved the 
plans for constructing the last s'lction of sea 
wall in front of pier 19. When this has been 
finished the sea wall will be complete from the 
channel to Meiggs wharf. 

The Pacific Mail S. S. Co., New York, reports 
for the six months ended June 30. 1919. gross 
revenue of^ $2,772,524 (against $1,989,735 for the 
corresponding period of 1918), and operating 
costs, including depreciation of $1,776,813 
(against $1,117,895 for 1918) and miscellaneous 
income of $245,048, leaving a total net revenue 
of $1,240,759, or an increase of $238,845 over 
same period last year. Estimates for this year 
do not include allowance for amortization or 
Federal taxes. For the year ending June 30, 
•1919, gross revenue shows a decrease oit $1,637,- 
534: operating costs, etc., show a decrease of 
$598,094 and miscellaneous income an increase 
of $267,206. Total net revenue is $772,234 less 
than the previous year. The fleet is now valued 
at $2,853,592, total assets foot up $16,490,924. and 
the surplus of assets over liabilities $2,538,539, 
exclusive of amortization and taxes. 

It has been definitely announced by the offi- 
cials of the American-Hawaiian .Steamship Com- 
pany that this concern, which did such a big 
business between the two American coasts be- 
fore the war, is not to resume any of the former 
serviqe. Arrangements have been made to char- 
ter the entire fleet to the United States Steel 
Products Company, and it mav be used in the 
trade with South America. No details of the 
charter have been given out, but it is believed 
that the rates were attractive, otherwise the 
well-established steamship concern would have 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 



preferred to continue to operate its own ships. 
Recently the company announced that owing 
to the increased cost of operation it would not 
resume the former Atlantic-Pacific service, and 
that it would be impossible to maintain the fleet 
on the old run and compete successfully against 
such odds. The company served as operator 
and manager of more than thirty Government 
ships during the past year. 

Unable to handle the huge volume of freight 
and passenger business now being offered for 
the trans-Pacific service, the Toyo Kisen Kaisha 
is arranging to increase the number of ships now 
operating between the Orient and San Francisco 
and also on the run between Japan and Val- 
paraiso by the way of San Francisco. Atsunori 
Mitsuhashi, chief superintendent of the engineer- 
ing department of the Toyo Kisen Kaisha, and 
consulting engineer of the Asana Shipbuilding 
Company of Japan, who arrived at San Fran- 
cisco during the week on the Shinyo Maru, an- 
nounced that the following new vessels would 
be placed in service about January 1: A new 
20,000 tons displacement passenger liner in the 
direct San Francisco-Yokohama service. Three 
additional big cargo steamships for the Orient- 
San Francisco service. Three passenger and 
freight liners to be installed on the run between 
Valparaiso, San Francisco and Japan. The new 
passenger liner for the San Francisco service has 
been launched in Japan and is now receiving 
the finishing touches, with the exception of the 
installation of the passenger accommodations. 
Mitsuhashi will study the travel conditions and 
then decide what accommodations may be 
needed. 

The use of faulty second-hand containers, to- 
gether v/ith improper stowage of vegetable oils 
shipped to San Francisco from the Orient and 
South Pacific, is causing the consignors and con- 
signees of the oil a fortune each month, accord- 
ing to local shippers. The attention of all con- 
cerned in the local handling and ownership of 
the oil was attracted during the last few days 
when it was noted that immense quantities of 
the high-priced nut and bean extracts leaked 
from the containers discharged from the steam- 
ship 'Cadaretta" and flooded the decks of the 
Peterson lighters, which were used in the trans- 
shipment to the Breck-Mitchell plant on the 
channel. It is estimated that as high as 40 
per cent, of the oil containers are second hand 
and faulty. That is when the entire case and 
barrel shipments are taken into consideration. 
The only remedy, the experts say, is to do 
away with the use of old barrels and tins. Re- 
cently it has been impossible to get an ample 
supply of new barrels and other containers and 
the shippers were compelled to ship their pro- 
duct in the ones that were available. According 
to officials of the Breck-Mitchell Co. of San 
Francisco, this concern handled more vegetable 
oils during the month of August than during 
the first six months of 1918. The receipts to- 
taled 140,000 cases and 40,000 barrels, valued at 
more than $2,000,000. Much of the oil was 
stored in the warehouses several months ago 
but recently there has been a brisk movement 
and the oil is now being shipped to the East 
as fast as it arrives. 

Four steel and 24 wood ships were launched 
in British Columbia during the first half of 1919. 
The total deadweight tonnage of these ships 
amounted to 75,500, In 1918 there were 42 ships 
launched on the Canadian Pacific coast, with a 
total deadweight tonnage of 155,600. As far as 
the building of wooden ships is concerned, there 
seems every [Jrospect that the industry will be 
permanent. Large contracts were undertaken 
for several foreign governments, notably for 
France, for whom one firm alone — the Founda- 
tion Co. of Victoria, B. C. — turned out 20 wood 
steamers, each of 3,000 tons deadweight. British 
Columbia has unlimited supplies of timber well 
suited to the construction of these vessels. In 
the case of steel shipbuilding conditions are very 
different. Present contracts are sufficient to 
keep the two steel shipbuilding concerns in Van- 
couver occupied until the end of this year, while 
further contracts for the Canadian Government 
are expected to keep them going at reduced 
pressure until the summer of 1920. When these 
contracts are completed, without substantial 
Government assistance, British Columbia yards 
cannot hope to compete with Atlantic yards un- 
til steel is produced in the province in substan- 
tial quantities. There is no present prospect of 
this. Prices prevailing during the war alone 
made it possible for British Columbia to com- 
pete for steel sliipbuilding contracts with other 
parts of the world. Unless substantial assist- 
ance is forthcoming from the Dominion Gov- 
ernment in some form, it seems probable that 
steel shipbuilding will disappear from the Cana- 
dian Pacific coast. 

F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention, 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., 3rd F'loor. California 
St., nr. Montgomery. Phone, Sutter 5807 (Adv.) 




Affiliated v/lth 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 

and 

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS' FEDERATION. 



THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 
328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago. 111. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 
Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 
NEW YORK CITY.... GUST AVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA. Pa... OSCAR CHRISTIANSEN, Agt. 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va T. NELSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala W. F. CATTELL • Aeent 

681/2 South Michael Street 

NEW ORI-EANS, La o. MORTENSEN, Agent 

4001/2 Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex D. F. PERRY, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I h. BLANKE, Agent 

492 South Water Street 

PORTLAND, Me c. MARTELL, Agent 

348 Fore Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE. Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 
Branches: 

BOSTON. Mass j. A. MARTIN. Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. QUINN. Agent 

54 Commercal Place 

NEWPORT NEWS WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

BALTIMORE, Md F. R. STOCKL. Agent 

802-804 South Broadway 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa..O. CHRISTIANSEN, Sub. Agt. 

206 Moravian Street 

MOBILE, Ala rc. RAVING, Sub. Agent 

104 South Commerce Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex...G. SCHROEDER, Sub. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex J. CLAUSEN, Sub. Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 40 Burling Slip 

Telephone John 396 
New York Branches: 

NEW YORK. N. Y 164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y 110 Hamilton Avenue 

Branches: 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 138 South Second Street 

BALTIMORE, Md 802 South Broadway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 127 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex 132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 221 20th Street 

BOSTON. Mass 3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, Va 513 Bast Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La 400y2 Fulton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 104 S. Commerce Street 

PROVIDENCE. R. 1 27 Wlckenden Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON. Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Agency: 
GLOUCESTER. Mass 163 Main Street 



LAKE DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREA") LAKES. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, 111 THOS. A. HANSON, Treasurer 

328 W. Randolph Street, Phone Franklin 278 

BUFFALO, N. Y GEORGE HANSEN. Agent 

55 Main Street. Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O GEO. L. MARTIN. Agent 

308 W. Superior Avenue, Phone Main 1842 

MILWAUKEE, Wis CHAS. BRADHERING. Agent 

162 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich K. B. NOLAN, Agent 

44 Shelby Street, Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR. 47 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO. O S. R. DYE, Agent 

704 Summit Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. O JOHN MORRIS. Agent 

992 Day Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA. N. Y 

PATRICK O'BRIEN. A^ent 

122% Main Street, Phone 890 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

Phone South Chlcaifo 1B9» 

fUPERIOR, Wle »S2 Banks Avenue 

(Continued on Pmt* 11-) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUT. SCHARRENBERG Editor 

B. A. SILVER Business Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, bv mail - 12.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Office, Maritime Hail Building, 

69 Clay Street, San Francisco. Telepiione Kearny 2228. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of eacli week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided tor in Section 1103, Act of Octo- 
ber 3, 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer s name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTE^IEER 17, 1919. 



:-^7 THOUSAND STRONG. 



In round numbers the membership of 
the International Seamen's Union of Amer- 
ica has now reached the fiftyrseven thou- 
sand mark. And there is positively no in- 
dication of any letting-up in the grovvtli. 

The Atlantic District Unions have as- 
sumed a lead in membership of splendid 
])roportion— with more than .32.000 names, 
in ijood standing, on their roll liooks. 

(hi the Pacific the L'nions are holding 
their own. as usual : the opi)ortunities for 
adding members bejng somewhat limited 
because the District has been fairly thor- 
oughlv organized for years. 

In the Lakes District the Unions have 
had to contend with the antagonism of the 
Steel Trust but the organizing campaign 
now carried on among the iron and steel 
workers by the National Committee, under 
the auspices of the American Federation 
of Labor, is rapidly bringing matters to a 
climax. The specific demands of the Lakes 
District I^nions are as follows: 

fa) That a minimnm living wage shall he es- 
tabli.shed sufficient to enable sailors to maintain 
family life. 

(b) That the three-watch system now in opera- 
tion in other departments of the ships shall be 
extended to include members of the deck crew 
and that the eight-hour day shall prevail while 
the vessel is in port, with rates for overtime and 
for Sunday work in port. 

(c) The abolition of the resistration card sys- 
tem which is being maintained by tlic steam- 
ship companies in violation of arbitration deci- 
sions. 

(d) Recognition of the Union. 

If it should be necessary to strike for 
these most reasonable demands the Lakes 
Seamen will not be lonesome for the vari- 
ous national and international unions, rep- 
resenting the workers of the steel industry, 
will act jointly to abolish the dictatorship 
of the steel barons. The workers in that 
industry, as in all others, will no longer be 
denied the right to organize in trade-unions 
and to have a voice in determining the 
conditions under which they live. The 
entire membership of the International 
Seamen's Union of America on the Atlaniic 
and the Pacific will, of course, render every 



possible assistance if such a strike should 
be called. 

The combined cash resources of the I. S. 
U. of A. are now close to $800,000 and 
never in history has there been a disposi- 
tion on the part of the organized seamen 
to lay down in a fi.ght when the issue is 
forced by a small but arrogant group of 
tyrants such as control the U. S. Steel 
Corporation. 



LLOYD'S LATEST RETURNS. 



Shipbuilding returns for the quarter ended 
June 30, 1919, just issued by Lloyd's Regis- 
ter of Shipping — which only take into ac- 
count vessels of 100 tons gross and upwards 
actually begun — show for the entire world, 
excluding Germany, a total of 2230 steam 
vessels under construction, of a gross regis- 
ter tonnage of 7,660,218, of which the Uni- 
ted Kingdom alone accounts for 719 vessels 
of 2,494,569 tons gross. Sailers number 296 
of 357,549 tons, of which 63 of 29,481 tons 
are under construction in the United King- 
dom. 

Of the vessels enumerated above as under 
construction in the LTnited Kingdom, 609 of 
2,033,319 tons, were building under the survey 
of Lloyd's Register with a view to classifica- 
tion. A notable feature is that of the 719 
steamers listed for the United Kingdom, only 
eight are of wood, while 38 are small cement 
vessels. Again, of the 719 steamers, 454 are 
under 5000 tons, 203 are between 5000 and 
8000 tons, 37 are between 8000 and 12,000 
tons, 11 are between 12,000 and 15,000 tons, 
14 are between 15,000 and 25,000 tons. There 
is no steamer building over 25,000 tons in 
the United Kingdom, which shows that there 
is no anixety about replacing the "Lusitania" 
and "Britannic." An outstanding feature of 
the return is that the figures for shipbuilding 
in the United States exceed those for the 
LIniled Kingdom by 1.350,093 tons. In steel 
steamers and motor vessels alone, American 
figures exceed the Briti.sh by 670,873 tons. 
In wood steamers and motor vessels the 
L'nited States excess is about 418,000 tons. 
The balance of the American excess over the 
British figures is made up of sailing vessels. 



A British exchange is authority for the 
rather significant statement that Burmese 
labor only was cmi)loyed in the buihling, 
at Rangoon, of an auxiliary-sailing vessel 
of 1800 tons deadweight capacity. She is 
built of first-class teak throughout and 
classed Al in Lloyd's Register. Her prin- 
cipal dimensions are : Length over all, 
230 feet; on keel, 200 feet; breadth molded, 
38 feet; depth, 18^ feet; with flush main 
deck fore and aft. She will be fitted with 
crude oil auxiliary engines as soon as they 
can be obtained from England. 



CAPITAL AND LABOR CONFAB. 



The Los Angeles Central Labor Union has 
resolved that henceforth it "shall not expend 
one cent in any injunction proceeding that 
may be brought against Labor." The policy is 
to lie "ignore the injunction and go to jail." 
Since California judges have not been miserly 
with injunctions there is likely to be some- 
thing popping on the Coast before long. 



'J"he economic organization is the funda- 
mental power. It is that which declares, de- 
mands, secures their achievement and main- 
tains standards. Be not deceived into putting 
all trust in other agencies. The union's the 
thing. 



President Wilson's call for a Labor-Capi- 
tal confab to convene in Washington on 
October 6 is not according to any estab- 
lished precedent. In fact, it is ccjntrary to 
all practices that have obtained. The idea 
of representatives of the working classes, 
the bankers, the manufacturers^ and the 
farmers getting together, under presidential 
sponsorship, for the purpose of arriving at 
an understanding as to how the business 
of the country shall be conducted, would 
have been pronounced revolutionary only 
a few years back. Now,' this step is ap- 
parently taken for the purpose of seek- 
ing means to counteract the radical ten- 
dencies which prevail. "Events seriousiy 
threatening the welfare of the country arc 
ra])idly drawing to a climax," said Secre- 
tar}- of the Interior Franklin K. Lane ii; 
urging upon President Wilson the need 
for immediate action in the matter of call- 
ing such a conference. lie expressed tii' 
opinion that the studies of the conference 
should be along two lines, as follows: 

F'irst, there should be a determination of the 
principles that should govern in all relations 
between employer and employe. This should 
be founded on good conscience, aild should 
cover the question of wages to labor and re- 
turn on capital, opportunity for advancement 
and betterment and recognition of merit. 

Second, there should be the determination of 
ways by which these principles might be carried 
out. 

In calling the conference, the President 

stated the purposes to be : 

To canvass every relevant feature of the pres- 
ent industrial situation. 

To work out cooperatively a practicable meth- 
od of association, based upon real community 
of interest, which will redound to the welfare 
of all the people. 

The conference will be made up of for- 
ty-five representatives to be selected as fol- 
lows : 

.\nierican Federation of Labor, fifteen; United 
States Chamber of Commerce, five; National 
Industrial Conference Board, five: farming or- 
ganizations, three; investment bankers, two; 
selected by the President, fifteen. 

In his letter to the dififcrent organizations 
asking them to send delegates to the con- 
ference, President Wilson directs attention 
to the unsettled industrial situation and 
adds: 

The necessity of devising at once methods 
b}' which we can speedily recover from this 
condition and obviate the wastefulness caused 
by the continued interruption of many of our 
important industrial enterprises by strikes and 
lockouts emphasizes the need of the meeting of 
the minds in the conference such as I have 
suggested. 

That a National Labor-Capital confer- 
ence would be called, upon President W^il- 
son's return from Europe, was predicted in 
the editorial columns of The Journal sev- 
eral months ago. Obviously, the present 
so called "industrial unrest" coupled with 
the high cost of living can not be disposed 
of by a display of force on either side, nor 
by any action of the Government no mat- 
ter how well meant. 

The one sure way of getting somewhere 
is for the two essential personal factors, 
I^abor and Management, to get together 
and talk it over. And if there is still in 
existence in America a group of employers 
who refuse to meet and deal collectively 
v,-ith their organized employes then prompt 
steps ought to be taken by all classes of 
Americans to show those gentlemen that 
they are living in a fool's paradise. The 
American people have just had a hand in 
dcstroN'ing a military autocracy abroad and 
they will not tolerate an industrial au- 
tocracy right at home! 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



FISH PROTECTION. 



Not the least interesting event in the 
current news is the signing at Washington 
of the fisheries convention with Canada, 
having in view the protection of the sock- 
eye in Puget Sound and the Frazer River. 
To quote the official forecast: 

These regulations will enable the industry to 
be conducted on a diminished scale for the next 
eight years. They will afford a much greater 
escapement of fish to the spawning grounds 
than has been the case heretofore; and they will 
enable observation as to the results, which wil! 
begin to show themselves in 1923 if. as con- 
templated, tlie regulations become effective in 
1919. With the information that will then be 
before them, the commissioners will be in a 
position to know whether further restrictions are 
needed or what modifications in the regulations 
are desirable. 

Secretary Hylen of the Alaska Fi.sher- 
men's Union, years ago sounded a note of 
warning against the destructive effects of 
certain modern fish-catching devices and 
was largely instrumental in securing the 
regulations now existing in Alaska waters. 
The treaty just signed is, therefore, a plain 
recognition of the fact that the organized 
fishermen know a thing or two about fish 
and fishing. Moreover, it again proves that 
practical knowledge of an industry's needs 
is difficult to acquire except through actual 
experience and personal contact with the 
problem involved. 



SEAMEN'S HALF PAY. 



Indignation regarding the high cost of 
living in America is likely to diminish 
when one begins to examine available sta- 
tistics from Europe. In America the in- 
crease in the cost of living over 1914 is 
approximately 100 per cent. Now note 
what has happened elsewhere. In a recent 
issue of the Paris edition of the Daily Mail, 
the following figures are quoted from a 
report made b)' the Statistical Bureau of 
Berne, Switzerland, which represent the in- 
crease over pre-war prices in certain coun- 
tries : Italy, 481 per cent. ; France, 368 per 
cent. ; Switzerland, 257 per cent. ; and in 
England, 240 per cent. 



Orders have just been issued by the 
Emergency Fleet Corporation to builders of 
wood ships reciuiring all such vessels to 
undergo a twenty-four-hour trial trip at sea 
loaded. Heretofore trial trips of only twelve 
hours were required. It is presumed the 
new requirement is the result of too many 
structural defects which have become visi- 
ble only after the vessels had put to sea, 
compelling them to put into the nearest 
port for repairs and earning for them the 
descri])tive appellation "lame ducks." 



By an overwhelming' vote the British 
Trades Union Congress, which has been in 
session at Glasgow, Scotland, adopted a 
resolution favoring the nationalization of 
the coal mines. The motion, presented by 
Robert Smillie, the miners' leader, was car- 
ried by a vote of 4,478,000 against 77,000. 
For all practical purposes this is a unani- 
mous vote and it looks as if the private 
monopoly of natural resources is rapidly 
nearing the end of its sway in old Eng- 
land. 



We assert, without fear of successful 
contradiction, that no organization can long 
endure or enjoy security and reasonable 
content and develop a proper psychology 
of the masses, if in any way it attemi)ts to 
restrict by compulsions, the right to vote 
as one's conscience dictates. 



Seamen's Right to Demand One-Half of Wages 

Due, When in Port, is Upheld in Circuit 

Court of Appeals. 



As briefly stated in last week's issue of the 
Journal a decree of the U. S. District Court 
(N. D. Fla.) dismissing a libel filed by John 
Dillon, carpenter on the British .S. S. "Strat- 
hearn," against that vessel, to recover wages 
earned, has been reversed by the Circuit Court 
of Appeals (Fifth Circuit). 

Dillon made demand upon the master of the 
ship, two days after her arrival at Pensacola, 
where she delivered cargo, for one-half of the 
wages he had earned. This demand was not 
complied with. The lower court dismissed the 
libel as the result of its conclusion that the de- 
mand was prematurely made, having been made 
within less than five days after the arrival of 
the ship at the port where the demand was 
made, though no such demand had previously 
been made, and service and the ship's voyage 
had begun several months before. The "Strat- 
hearn" (D. C.) 239 Fed. 583. 

The opinion of the Circuit Court follows, in 
full: 

Walker, Circuit Judge: — The provision (of the 
Act of March 4, 1915) that "such demand shall 
not be made before the expiration of, nor of- 
tener than once in five days," is not to be given 
the effect of requiring that five days must have 
elapsed after the arrival of a ship at a port 
where it loads or delivers cargo before a demand 
for half wages can be made with the effect 
given to it by the statute. Evidently the in- 
tention was that such a demand should not have 
the effect given to it by the statute if it is 
made within five days "after the voyage has 
commenced," or if made sooner than five days 
after the making of a previous demand con- 
templated by the statute. The apcllant's de- 
mand was not premature. 

The decree appealed from is sought to be 
sustained on other grounds, of which mention 
will be made: 

It is conterkded that the appellant was not 
within the terms of the statute, because he was 
a British subject, who shipped on a British 
vessel in a British port. There is nothing to 
indicate that the word "seaman," in the clause 
"that this section shall apply to seamen on for- 
eign vessels while in harbors of the United 
States" etc., was intended to include only sea- 
men of this country, or that that clause was 
intended to have the same meaning it would 
have had if, instead of the word "seamen," the 
words "American seamen" had been used. 
Another clause in the -same sentence, "and the 
courts of the United States shall be open to 
such seamen for 'ts enforcement," makes it 
quite plain that foreign seamen are within the 
provision. It cannot be supposed that the last- 
quoted clause would have been inserted, if only 
seamen of this country had been in contempla- 
tion. Legislation was not needed to open the 
courts of the United States to them. Provisions 
of the act looking to the abrogation of treaties 
containing provisions inconsistent with it are 
indicative of the legislative fntention to make 
such provisions as the one in question applicable 
to foreign seamen while in the ports of the 
United States. The circumstance that the title 
of the act shows that a part of its purpose 
was "to promote the welfare of American sea- 
men in the merchant marine of the United 
States" is not indicative of an intention to make 
the provision in question applicable to American 
seamen only. It well may have been regarded 
that competition of American seamen in for- 
eign ports with foreign seamen for service on 
foreign vessels would be hampered, if in Ameri- 
can ports only American seamen had the right 
given by the provision in question, so that on 
that ground the services of foreign seamen 
would be preferred by foreign vessels destined 
to American ports. 

By the articles signed by the libelant in Great 
Britain he agreed to serve on a voyage not 
exceeding three years' duration to any port or 
places within designated limits, which included 
ports of this country, for stated wages, which, 
less advances made, were payable on completion 
of the agreed service, which had not been com- 
pleted when the demand for half the wages 
earned was made. In behalf of the appellee it 
is contended that if the provision in question 
is so construed as to be applicable to the case 
at bar, it is invalid on the ground that it is one 
not within the legislative power of the United 
States to make, in that it undertakes to nullify 
contracts entered into between foreigners in a 
foreign jurisdiction, in which such contracts arc 
valid and enforceable. The enforcement of the 
provision in question in behalf of a foreign 
seaman situated as the appellant was does not 
have that effect. From the fact that a contract 
is valid and enforceable in the jurisdiction in 
which it was made, it does not follow that it is 
effective to govern the relation.s of the parties 
to it while they are in another jurisdiction with 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cab. Sept. 15, 1919. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., C. F. May presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping slow; members ashore plentiful. 

It was decided to send a full quota of dele- 
gates to the coming San Francisco convention 
of the International Seamen's Union of America. 
Nominations of delegates will be made at Head- 
quarters and Branches in the regular meetings 
to be held on October 6. The election will take 
place in the meetings held on November 17. 

JOHN H. TFNNISON, 

Secmtary pro tern. 
Maritime Hall Bide. ^9 Cltv Street Tel 
Kearnv 2228 



Victoria, B. C„ Sept. 8, 1919, 
No meeting. Shipping slow. 

I ETCHELLS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 
Street. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 8, 1919. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

W. G. MILLARD, Agent. 
58 Powell Street E. P. O. Box 1365. Tel 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma x^gency, Sept. 8, 1919. 
Shipping medium. 

H L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 8, 1919. 
Shipping quiet. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Lm.x 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 8, 1919. 
Shipping good; men scarce. 

ED, ROSENBERG, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 8, 1919, 
Shipping good; prospects good. 

TACK ROSEN, Agent. 
881,4 Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 8, 1919. 
Shipping fair; men scarce. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128"^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P O Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 1, 1919. 
Shippinc dull; prospects poor. 

TACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



fleadquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 12, 1919. 
The regular weekly meeting was called to or- 
der at 7 p. m.. Eugene Burke in the chair. Sec- 
retary reported shippin.g fair. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 
42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 

Seattle Agency, Sept. 4, 1919. 
Shipping fair. 

J. LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock. Room 203. P. O. Box 
214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 4, 1919. 
No meeting. Shipping good; men scarce. 

JOE MACK. Agent. 
613 Beacon Street. Phone Sunset 336. P. O. 
Box .54. 



DIED. 

Julius Andersen, No. 145, a native of Sweden, 
age 55. Died at Grays Harbor, Wash., Sept. 
11, 1919. 

Jose Castillo, No. 1790. a nali\c of Mexico, 
age 42. Died at Seattle, Wash.. Sei>t. 12, 1919. 

Tulius P. Holmstrom, No. 1692, a native of 
Finland, a-e 40. Died in Finland, April 25, 1919. 



Ignited States Consul F. A. Whitehead of 
Prince Rupert, B. C, in his report says that the 
canned salmon supnly this year will be the 
smallest on record in many years. He says: 
".Spots on the Alaskan coast which have been 
noted for years for the salmon catch failed this 
year, and several of the largest canneries have 
closed down entirely. One concern which usu- 
ally cans 125,000 cases this year has put up but 
3800 cases." 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER 

(By Laurence Todd) 



Are policemen American citizens? If 
not, why not? And if they are American 
citizens why can't they belong to the 
American Federation of Labor? 

That question and issue have been put 
squarely up to the Supreme Court of the 
District of Columbia. Upon its decision 
depends the welfare of the policemen in 
some forty cities and towns who have been 
admitted, or have applied for admission, to 
the American Federation of Labor. If 
the District Supreme Court gives the 
capital city commissioners authority to 
dismiss the "cops" who have joined the 
A. F. of L., it will he the signal for 
reactionary politicians everywhere to de- 
stroy the policemen's organizations. 

The issue came to a head in Washington 
when nine-tenths of the men on the force 
joined the new labor union and were given 
a charter by the A. F. of L. This action 
grew out of the high cost of living and 
the failure of the men to wring a wage 
increase either from the District commis- 
sioners or from Congress, which exercises 
a close supervision over municipal expendi- 
tures. After months of neglect the author- 
ities, both congressional and local, made 
a belated bid for public support by saying 
the petition for higher wages could not be 
entertained until the policemen had aban- 
doned their new union affiliation. Two 
weeks of membership in the union had 
brought the "cops'" case to light after 
everything else had failed, so the men were 
less than ever disposed to give up their 
new weapon. 

A crisis was reached when the District 
commissioners served notice a few days 
ago that every member of the union must 
desert it by September 7 and give a writ- 
ten pledge not to rejoin, or else sufifer 
dismissal from the service. On Septem- 
ber 4 lawyers for the policemen appealed 
to Justice Gould and procured from 
the Supreme Court an injunction which 
forbids the commissioners, temporar- 
ily, to dismiss any man because he 
belongs to the union. The next test will 
come on September 11, when the injunc- 
tion will either be made permanent or the 
commissioners will be permitted to crush 
the union. 

Both sides to the struggle understand 
how much is at stake. Samuel Gompers 
visited the District commissioners on the 
day the court acted, and told them that 
their entire attitude was based upon a 
misrepresentation of labor unionism, that 
the American Federation of Labor would 
be discredited if they should have their 
way, and that the American people would 
not tolerate such autocratic action by any 
set of officials. He is quoted as saying 
to the commissioners : 

"Four million Americans were trained 
to crush autocracy in Europe in the crisis 
through which we have just passed. These 
men do not now propose to stand for 
autocracy in the United States." 

Gompers is certainly "in a position just 
now to comprehend the modern temper of 
the American workers. Notwithstanding 
the joint plea which he and President 
Wilson made to the railroad shopmen to 
accept a temporary increase of 4 cents 
an hour and dro]) all disputes for a period 
of ninety days, the shopmen have rejected 



the plea by the astonishing official vote 
of 325,000 to 25,000. At Cumberland, 
]\Iaryland, 2000 shopmen actually went 
ahead with their walkout against the Presi- 
dent and the high cost of living, and small 
strikes of shopmen are reported from 
other points. The belief prevails, however, 
that the shopmen as a whole will be 
content for a while with their overwhelm- 
ing expression of blunt opinion, and not 
attempt a general strike at present. 

But what about the steel workers? 
President Gompers tells President Wilson 
that a general strike in the steel industry 
can scarcely be prevented unless Mr. 
Wilson shall prevail upon the steel barons 
to treat with the men. The urgency of 
the situation is shown in a telegram with 
which Gompers interrupted the President's 
tour in behalf of the peace treaty and 
League of Nations. The message overtook 
Mr. Wilson at St. Louis, and it read in 
part : 

"The executive committee (of the steel 
trade unions) have thus far been enabled 
to prevail upon the men not to engage 
in a general strike. . . . We cannot now 
affirm how much longer we shall be able 
to exert that influence, but we urge you, 
in the great work in which you are 
engaged, to give prompt attention to this 
most vital of issues ; for if the men can 
no longer be restrained it is impossible 
to foretell what the future may hold in 
store for an industrial crisis which may 
ensue and frustrate the peaceful and honor- 
able adjustment of industrial afYairs in 
our countr}'." 

From New York State comes further 
evidence that a do-nothing policy will 
not satisfy the American workers in this 
crisis. Two members, Messrs. Epstein 
and Pierce, had been appointed by the 
State Federation of Labor to conduct an 
inquiry into the high' cost of living. On 
September 1 they gave to the newspapers 
a statement in which they recommended 
that no more strikes of any kind be called 
for a period of six months. The con- 
servative press plavcd this "report" up 
big. 

James P. Holland promptly repudiated 
the recommendation in his capacity as 
president of the State Federation of Labor. 
Holland dismissed the two men from 
office and informed the public that they 
had gone beyond their instructions and 
acted without authority in making their 
recommendation. To that action the fol- 
lowing comment was added by Hugh 
Frayne, general organizer of the A. F. 
of L.: 

"No man nor organization can stop 
strikes so long as the cause for strikes 
remains. No one familiar with the situa- 
tion supposed for a moment that the 
so-called report by Epstein and Pierce 
s]>oke for the American Federation of 
Labor, or for any part of it. Likewise that 
section of the Cummins Bill which pro- 
poses to prevent strikes on the railroads 
is unworkable. So long as the men have 
cause to strike there will be strikes." 

That horny-handed producer of food 
and clothing, Elihu Root, tells the Amer- 
ican Bar Association all about the high 
cost of living. He explains that the aver- 
age American workman is ruining the 
country by his laziness, by his desire to 
do less and enjoy more leisure. The Bar 



Association applauded that accusation. But 
it was not satisfied with attacking the 
wage earners of the cities and towns. 
It turned in and assaulted the Farmers' 
Non-Partisan League labeled Townley a 
"Bolshevik" and "leader of an anti-consti- 
tutional movement." By this action the 
great legal minds of the nation made it 
clear they would like to exile or execute 
any one who attacks special privilege, 
whether by direct - action unionism or 
through the orderly use of the ballot box. 
When they talk about democracy and law 
and order they mean their present advan- 
tages. Anything that disturbs them is 
"anarchy." 

Much interest has been created by Frank 
Morrison's statement that the workers 
of this country were determined to make 
America safe for democracy, after the 
sacrifices they had made to destroy tyr- 
anny abroad. Morrison declared that the 
American Federation of Labor as a whole 
was not only behind the plan to give 
the technical and classified employees con- 
trol of the railroads, but that the coal 
mines of the country should be national- 
ized, since the miners were in favor of it 
and the whole nation would benefit. A 
sub-committee of the A. F. of L. executive 
council is now considering the details 
of the Plumb Plan, and some observers 
interpret Morrison's statement as a hint 
that the committee will endorse the project 
substantially in full. 

On the general subject of nationalization 
the Prime Minister of Bohemia, Mr. Tusar, 
gives an interesting interview in which he 
says : 

"A year ago a man who had predicted 
the nationalization of the soil would have 
been regarded as a hopeless lunatic. Some 
5(X) odd landowners elected 70 out of the 
243 members of the Czech legislature. 
Politically, their rights seemed to be un- 
assailable. 

"Nevertheless, we began our legislative 
work by overthrowing the nobles. This 
was not an act of class hatred. Those 
nobles were the chief obstacle to democ- 
racy, and they had to be removed. 

"The system of great landed property 
was removed by an act of the legislature, 
which provides that no family may possess 
more than 1,000 acres of arable land or 
pasture. Altogether, about 12,0(X),000 acres 
of wooded land and 5,200,000 acres of arable 
land are to be divided among 430,0(X) small 
holders, such as laborers and associations 
of workmen. 

"As soon as this task is well under way 
the natiohalization of the mines of all 
kinds will follow." 

British miners refuse to budge from their 
stand on nationalization, or to allow 
Premier Lloyd George to squirm out of 
his promise to abide by the report of the 
Sankey Commission, which recommended 
that private capital be retired from the 
mining industry. The coalition govern- 
ment is trying to side-track the Sankey 
report in favor of a proposal to allow 
the private corporations to continue in 
possession of the mines, under lease from 
the Government. On September 3 the 
Miners' Federation voted unanimously to 
reject the Lloyd George proposal. And the 
ne.Kt day the great Triple Alliance (Miners, 
Railway Men and Transport Workers) 
began consideration of a general strike to 
enforce nationalization, abolish military 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



conscription and compel withdrawal of 
troops from Russia. 

Of course the British Avorkers are being 
called "Bolsheviks" by all the hostile press 
and politicians. The Duke of Northumber- 
land says Russian gold is supporting the 
miners. To this charge Bob Smilie refers 
sarcastically to "my friend and comrade, 
the Duke," and calls upon the latter to 
"prove his charge or retract it." In refer- 
ring to the Government's broken promise, 
Smilie declares in a public address : 

"Lloyd George is merely the channel 
through which the majority of the capital- 
ists express themselves. The point at 
issue should be whether nationalization 
of the mines is right in itself or wrong, 
not whether the Government has power 
to resist or the miners power to compel. 
The cabinet is on the horns of a dilemma. 
If they give us any effective control of 
the industry they must nationalize the 
mines. I believe that the men are ready 
to co-operate with the Government if the 
cabinet is really in earnest in the matter. 
The miners are sincerely convinced that 
nationalization is the best thing in the 
interests of the whole nation." 

The question of a general strike will 
probably be decided by the trade union 
congress which met at Glasgow on Mon- 
day. Conservative London newspapers 
believe the labor men expect a new general 
election this fall and mean to make nation- 
alization the paramount issue. In every 
by-election but one this year the Lloyd 
George government has been badly beaten. 
And now Arthur Llenderson is a candidate 
on the Labor Party ticket in the Widnes 
district. Henderson has created a sensa- 
tion in replying to the charge that he 
hampered the government by his Russian 
policy during the war by declaring that 
Lloyd George wanted him to become Am- 
bassador to Russia in 1917, and that he, 
Henderson, refused to take the $40,000 

job. 

SHIPPING FACTS. 

The salient features in the activities of 
the United States Shipping Board from 
September, 1918, to September, 1919, have 
just been compiled, as follows: 

On August 29, 1919, the total sea-going 
tonnage under control of the United States 
Shipping Board, was as follows: 

Built by the Shipping Board. 
Tcnnagc 
No. Vessels Gross Deadweight 

Steel in 3.511,918 5,267.98,3 

Wood 315 728,079 1,100,218 

Composite .15 35,000 52,500 

Seized. 

From Germany. 94 567,490 601.003 

From Austria.. . 1 8,312 6^500 

Purchased. 

From Japan 15 85,880 128,820 

From Austria. .. 5 30,521 29,506 

Requisitioned. 

From private 
owners 58 346,580 519,870 

Total 1280 5,313,780 7,706,400 

(The foregoing tabulation does not include 122 
steel ships of 465.745 (deadweight) tons and 63 
wood ships of 246,982 (deadweight) tons, sold 
recently to private owners by the United States 
Shipping Board, nor seized foreign vessels that 
had been sunk.) 

America's rapid advance from an incon- 
sequential place among the maritime na- 
tions to the post of leadership in shipbuild- 
ing, was not only phenomenal but is a fair 
augury for the permanence of its new mer- 
chant marine, built under the stress of war. 
At the outbreak of the world struggle, mer- 
chant marine construction had almost be- 



come a lost art in this country. To-day 
this nation has more shipworkers, more 
shipyards, more shipways, more vessels 
under construction, and is turning them 
out more rapidly and in greater numbers 
than now issue from all the shipyards of 
all the world. 

As the ■ premier shipbuilding nation of 
the world America attained her place in 
one giant stride. Up to the outbreak of 
the war we had only 15 vessels of 1,000 
tons and over engaged in oversea trade. 
To-day the American flag floats from 1280 
ocean going steamships, 1107 of which had 
been built by the United States Shipping 
Board within the last two years. 

In June, 1914, the total gross tonnage 
under the American flag, including coast- 
wise shipping and the fleet operating on 
the Great Lakes, was 4,287,000 tons. 

In June, 1919, its gross tonnage was 11,- 
983,000, an increase of 278 per cent., chiefly 
in ocean going steamships. 

The steam tonnage under the American 
flag is now 24.8 per cent, of the steam ton- 
nage of the world. 

Seagoing Personnel. 

The seagoing personnel of the United 

States Shipping Board is as follows: 

Deck officers 4,592 

Engineer officers 4,592 9,184 

Deck force 15,720 

Engine and fire room 18,720 34,440 

Steward's department 7,936 

Total 51,560 



BOOZE FOR THE WEALTHY. 



Mr. Charles M. Schwab seems to have 
some definite views on the subject of prohi- 
bition. Also on most other subjects, as well 
as an admirable disposition to express them. 
Prohibition, says Mr. Schwab in effect, is 
presumably intended to prohibit the con- 
sumption of alcoholic liquors. That the law 
is directed only against the manufacture and 
sale of alcoholic liquors has nothing to do 
with the case. No one ever supposed that a 
legislature could look at anything straight 
in the face nor go anywhere by a . direct 
road. If no one had a disposition to drink 
alcoholic liquors there could be no conceiv- 
able objection to their sale or manufacture. 
But in this case the business was done in 
the usual left-handed way. Wishing to pro- 
hibit one thing. Congress proceeded to pro- 
hibit another. Instead of enacting that any 
one guilty of drinking a glass of wine after 
a certain date should be impaled, or boiled 
in oil, or whatever the appropriate penalty 
might be, it ordered that no one should sell 
or manufacture the glass of wine. Wine 
might be manufactured and sold in incon- 
ceivable quantities until a certain date. Peo- 
ple might lay in a sufficient supply to last 
until the return of national sanity, to keep 
themselves in a state of exhilaration for 
forty years. Prohibition, in other words, 
would apply only to poor people, to people 
who have no cellars nor the money to stock 
them. The rich man might buy enough 
alcohol to float a warship, and in this way 
he would purchase for himself a little niche 
forever beyond the reach of the law. 

This is all wrong, says Mr. Schwab. Peo- 
ple who have stocked their cellars ought to 
be compelled to "disgorge." It is an ugly 
word, but it is not ours. No man ought to 
be allowed to buy for himself an exemption 
from law. 

The situation f)resents some curious anom- 



alies. Thus the law permits a very rich man 
to be continually drunk for a century to 
come. If he belongs to the less wealthy 
class he must sober up, so to speak, in some 
sixty or seventy years. Middle-class people 
may drink steadily, let us say, for ten or 
twelve years. The man with the average 
salary must cease his libations in three or 
four years at the most. Poor men must en- 
ter on the path of virtue on or about July 
3, while the "submerged tenth," newspaper 
men and the like, will be fortunate if they 
have half a pint or so left over for the 
morning of July 1st. In a world that is 
being made safe for democracy — in Europe 
— it is well that we should have such an 
example of the home variety. — The Argo- 
naut. 



GIFTS WITH A MEANING 



The City of Paris, a few years before the 
war, presented the late Czar of Russia with 
an Easter egg containing jewels to the 
value of $10,000. The same year one of 
his devoted revolutionary subjects sent him 
an egg stulTed with dynamiite, timed to ex- 
plode at a certain hour. The weight of the 
egg aroused suspicion, and a tragedy was 
averted by the secret police opening the 
egg and discovering its contents. 



Demand the union label. 



Labor's Economic Platform 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. , 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and batliroom attachments in all houses or 
compartments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance wliereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by tlie Gov- 
ernment, with sucli regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



this statement printed in the financial 
columns of the New York press: 

"The Pacific Alail Steamship Company 
will immediately re-establish a service be- 
tween San Francisco and Baltimore by 
way of the Panama Canal. The new 
service will broaden the trade lanes now 
covered by the company, which extend 
from San Francisco, across the Pacific, to 
the Far East. All of the company's vessels 
are operated under the American flag." 



Wough ! Wough ! Wough ! 

Anarchy reigns I Soldiers are necessary 
at every strategic point! The president 
fiddles while Rome burns! 

The above epitomizes a shriek by for- 
mer United States Senator Bourne, head 
of the Republican Publicity Association, 
who demands that "army units should be 
distributed through the railroad centers, 
where trouble is most to be feared." 

The ex-lawmaker is blind to every efifort 
by the president and other citizens of all 
political creeds and classes to adjust these 
differences. He sees all the colors in the 
rainbow and in his frantic plea for troops 
charges the President with sitting "serenely 
in the ^^'hite House, apparently oblivious 
to the danger that confronts the nation." 

Mr. Bourne would solve the question 
mighty quick. He would station army 
units at all points, examine soldiers as to 
their railroad experience, establish motor 
truck trains, warn the public not to do 
unnecessary travel, etc., etc. It is also 
suggested that State authorities prepare 
a list of railroad workers who are "not 
under the control of the brotherhooods." 
No mention is made of machine guns, 
poison gases, battle planes or trench war- 
fare, but one can assume that these 
incidentals would be quickly brought into 
play as Mr. Bourne's "solution" developed. 
In the meantime the railroad shop men 
arc voting to postpone their strike and 
the railroad brotherhoods are not even 
discussing strike. 

Mr. Bourne's outburst, however, is what 
newspaper reporters term "hot stuff." 



A. F. of L. Council to Study Plumb Plan 
The A. F. of L. Executive Council will 
make a thorough study of the Plumb Plan 
solution of the railroad question before 
it passes upon the subject. This was 
decided upon at an extra session of the 
council, held during the week of August 
25-30, when many problems confronting 
the workers were considered. 

At the adjournment of the meeting Pres- 
ident Gompers made this statement: 

"The Executive Council had before it 
the representatives of the labor organiza- 
tions and their counsel who favored the 
Plumb Plan of railway ownership or 
railway control and administration. The 
council considered the plan, as well as the 
provisions of the Sims Bill dealing with 
this important subject. The plan and the 
bill, so the council declared, are of such 
transcendent importance to labor, to the 
people and to the country, that the coun- 
cil decided to defer final action deter- 
mining the position of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor thereon and that in the 
meantime a sub-committee was created 
for the purpose of examining into all the 



facts and evidence obtainable, to secure 
the advice of all who can contribute to 
a full understanding of the subject, and 
the subcommittee after its examination 
and investigation to report to the execu- 
tive council of the American Federation 
of Labor upon the entire subject." 

The actors' strike was indorsed by the 
executive council, as was the cigar makers' 
strike. Regarding the latter movement. 
President Gompers said : 

"The cigarmakers of the United States 
are engaged in strikes for improved con- 
ditions occasioned by the high cost of 
living, and there are 125,000 of that indus- 
try who are in the struggle. The execu- 
tive council indorsed that strike and 
pledged its moral and financial support 
to it, and will issue additionally an appeal 
to labor and friends to come to the finan- 
cial and moral assistance of the men 
engaged in that controversy." 



An Inquisitive Editor. 

Editor Evejue of the Capital Times of 
Madison, Wis., is asking embarrassing 
questions regarding the Mexican situation. 
He wants to know "why did these Mexican 
bandits bother us so little while the Euro- 
pean war was in progress?" 

"Surely," he says, "that was the time 
to carry on their depredations while the at- 
tention of this country was turned in an- 
other direction. 

"Why is it that these troubles put in an 
appearance so quickly when peace is again 
restored and our soldiers are coming 
back?" 



Many Voices Confuse British Unionists 

"Too many voices call too many orders 
and proffer too much advice" is one of 
the references James ^^^ Sullivan makes 
in a statement on industrial conditions in 
Great Britain. Mr. Sullixan is a member 
of New York Typographical L^nion and 
has seen years of active serAnce in the 
trade union movement. He was a member 
of a commission appointed by the national 
civic federation to visit England. The 
commission included representatives of 
business and Charles S. Barrett, president 
of the Farmers' Educational Co-Operative 
Union of America. 

]\Ir. Sullivan characterizes as "verbal 
coinages of stampeders after economic 
will-o'-the-wisps" the many phrases that 
are now so recklessly used. 

"The stage now arrived at through the 
tutorship of the British government and 
the establishment of its various councils 
and committees," he says, "is less satis- 
factory than the present status of the 
employer and employed classes in the 
L'nitcd States. 

"Both sides here know where they stand. 
In Britain, what with works committees, 
joint councils, industrial conference com- 
mittees and the standing trade union agree- 
ments, too many voices call too many 
orders and proft'er too much advice." 

The working of Whitley councils is 
explained at length by Mr. Sullivan. These 
councils were recommended by a govern- 
ment commission, anrl its rejiort has been 
given much attention in America because 
it "heralded a new age." These councils, 
it is now shown "do not suggest anv 
method in shop administration not known 
to American workers in the mechanical 



trades. The main principle advocated is 
"granting to work people a greater share 
in matters affecting their industry." 

"Up to May 1, 33 joint industrial coun- 
cils have been organized and constitutions 
drafted for 19 other industries. Steps 
had also been taken to apply the Whitley 
report to government industrial establish- 
ments, the civil service and administrative. 
]>rofessional. technical and clerical staffs 
of local authorities. 

"Evidently the Whitley recommendations 
have looked better to the lay public and 
to small industries than to the big unions, 
as councils have not been formed in ship- 
building, cotton, railways, engineering 
(metal trades), coal mining and steel. 
From the American viewpoint, the Whitley 
committee recommendations and the work 
done thereunder to date show excellent 
intention, elaborate preparation, but a 
rather scanty crop of results." 



SEAMEN'S HALF PAY. 
(Continued from Page 7.) 

the law or public policy of which it is in conflict. 
A contract may be valid and enforceable where 
it was made, and yet be unenforceable in another 
jurisdiction. Union Trust Co. v. Grossman, 245 
U. S. 412, 38 Sup. Ct. 147, 62 L. Ed. 368; The 
"Kensington," 183 U. S. 263, 22 Sup. Ct. 102, 
46 L. Ed. 190. The fact that the seaman and 
the vessel are British does not prevent the 
American law being applicable to them while 
both are in an American port. Patterson v. Bark 
"Eudora," 190 U. S. 169, 23 Sup. Ct. 821, 47 
L. Ed. 1002. 

The shipping contract would be given the 
effect of contravening a law of the United 
States if it were permitted to prevent the ac- 
cjuisition and e.xercise of a right given to "sea- 
men on foreign vessels while in harbors of the 
United States" by a statutory provision the 
terms of which make it plain that the right is 
given notwithstanding any contract stipulation 
to the contrary. The statute in question is not 
given an extra-territorial operation by according 
to it the effect of preventing the existence of 
a contract made in another jurisdiction from 
depriving a seamen who is a party to such 
contract of a right given to him by statute while 
both the seaman and the ship are within the 
territory of the nation the law of which gives 
the right. The foreign contract does not pre- 
vent the relations of the parties to it being 
governed by the law of the place where the 
seaman and the ship are. The law of the place 
where the contract was made would be given 
an extra-territorial operation if it is allowed to 
determine the question of the enforceability of 
the contract in another jurisdiction, the law of 
which forbids the enforcement of such a con- 
tract. 

Another suggestion is that, if the provision 
in question is held to be applicable to the facts 
of this case, it is violative of the Constitution 
of the United States, in that it deprives a party 
of contract rights without due process of law. 
The statute does not purport to affect, and does 
not affect, the rights of the parties under a 
contract made in a foreign jurisdiction, except 
to prevent such contract standing in the way 
of the enforcement of the domestic law in be- 
half of and against parties who have subjected 
themselves to the domestic jurisdiction. "It is 
part of the law of civilized nations, when a 
merchant vessel of one country enters the ports 
of another for the purposes of trade, it subjects 
itself to the law of the place to which it goes, 
unless by treaty or otherwise the two countries 
have come to some different understanding or 
aarecment." Wildenhus' Case, 120 U. S. 1, 11, 
7 Sup. Ct. 385, 387 (30 L. Ed. 565). A contract 
made in Great Britain for the services of a 
British seaman on a British vessel which goes 
to an American port is not so far effective as 
to be enforceable in the latter place, if its en- 
forcement there would result in setting at 
naught the law of that place. As the foreign 
contract is incapable of giving the right claimed 
by virtue of it, the statute in question cannot 
properly be regarded as depriving a party to 
the contract of a right under it; the right 
claimed not being one which was conferred by 
the contract otherwise. The obligation of a 
contract entered into in one jurisdiction does 
not extend so far as to entitle the parties to 
such contract to be exempt from the operation 
of the law of another jurisdiction to which 
the}' subject themselves, which law forbids such 
effect being given to the contract as is sought 
to be given to it in that jurisdiction. In our 
opinion the provision in question is not invalid 
on either of the grounds urged against it. 
The court erred in dismissing the libel. 
The decree appealed from is reversed. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



SELLING "LAME DUCKS." 



Several weeks ago the Press Bureau of 
the Shipping Board gave out a story about 
a purchaser in London having committed 
himself to buy 20 wooden ships and tied 
funds in a bank to secure a 30 days' option 
on an additional lOQ boats of the same 
type. The price reported paid was just 
under $86 per ton deadweight, for boats 
of the 3,500-ton deadweight class. Strange 
to say, not another word has since been 
heard of that transaction and one of the 
local commercial dailies does not hesitate 
to define it as a "pure fake." The story 
which the Shipping Board sent out on that 
occasion contains passages which read al- 
most like a circular from a new company 
trying to float stock ; though, as a matter 
of fact, there is a great deal of similarity 
between the propaganda for the sale of the 
wooden shijis and the circulars which are 
sent out to tempt people into buying stocks. 

One may talk wooden ships as long as 
he likes without being able to get out of 
the fact that "emergency" wooden ships, 
built of green lumber, have nothing in com- 
mon with the good old craft of several 
generations ago which are still in service. 
Here is where comparisons are indeed 
odious. Though the Shipping Board may 
say that "the purchase and utilization of 
wood ships at this time might well be the 
first step in the establishment of shipping 
lines with unlimited opportunities for ex- 
pansion," the prospects are that the oppor- 
tunities for expansion of a steamship line 
working with wood tonnage would be ex- 
tremely limited. The Shipping Board also 
said that "the profits from the earnings 
of wood ships might start a new concern in 
its growth," and as proof of this assertion 
it offered in evidence a list of services 
operated from U. S. ports with wood ton- 
nage. 

To the layman the list of vessels there 
given might seem imposing, particularly the 
list of well-known shipowing firms which 
operate wooden tonnage, until it is realized 
that practically none of the firms mentioned 
own a single one of these vessels, but only 
manage or operate them on commission 
basis for the Government. Where then is 
the proof of "profits from the earnings of 
wood ships" which "might start a new 
concern in its growth"? It is not a fact 
that many of the firms which have been 
operating wooden ships for the Govern- 
ment would under no circumstances be- 
come owners of such vessels and that they 
consented to operating the ships on Gov- 
ernment account only because the ships 
were handed over to them and that re- 
fusal to handle wooden ships might have 
prejudiced them with the Board in en- 
deavoring to obtain tonnage better suited 
for their own trades. 

Even then, where is there to be found 
in the Board's own statement anything 
which might give the prospective investor 
a single fact as to the financial results of 
o])cration of wood tonnage. The rates 
quoted by underwriters on cargo carried 
by this class of vessels are. however, suf- 
ficent indication of their fitness to carry 
dry and perishable cargo ; but no matter 
how much the carrier may succeed in this 
respect in contracting himself out of per- 
sonal liability for damages to goods in 
transit, the question of a fair return upon 
the investment still remains unanswered. 



In this respect alone, no credence can be 
put in the statement made on behalf of 
the Shipping Board that wooden ships pre- 
sent "the only opportunity in the world 
market to-day for the purchase of seagoing 
tonnage at a \ery attractive price," because 
wooden ships of the class offered by the 
.Shipping Board at $90 per ton deadweight 
are not "good value at bottom rates for 
immediate delivery" and if a Lake-type 
steel steamer of the 3,.^00 — 4,200-ton dead- 
weight class is worth the official price of 
$200 per ton deadweight, no "emergency" 
wooden ship can be worth one-fourth that 
sum, or $.^0 a ton, which would be a little 
more than one-half the official price put 
u])on them. 

No reference to the Lake-built boats 
would be complete without mention of the 
recent deal whereby a New York corpora- 
tion was to "purchase" 100 of such boats 
on foreign account and to pay for them 
in three years. There is now every -indi- 
cation that the deal will not go through. 
What it really amounted to was that the 
supposed buyer would secure a three-year 
charter on the boats with option to pur- 
chase: the charter hire being credited to 
the sale price. The charter rates men- 
tioned were $7.50 on the deadweight for 
the first year, $6.50 for the second and 
$5.50 for the third. In other words, the 
re])orted purchaser could, without any 
considerable outlay of capital, have at his 
dis]iosal 100 ships chartered for three years 
at rates 359^ below the market and which, 
in the event of a sale would net him a 
sure profit; while the initial investment was 
at all times protected by the rate of hire 
being below that ruling in the open market. 
One could not conceive of a better way to 
pick up easy money in shipping. — Nauticus, 
New York. 



WAR DEBTS. 



Two details of the week's news will not 
esca]ie the attention of those who seek to 
look below the surface of things. An in- 
conspicuous item sent from Rome states 
that "the Rome newspapers assert that 
Great Britain has agreed to defer the pay- 
ment by Italy of interest on Italy's debt 
to Great Britain," amounting to about a half- 
billion lire annually, while a special dis- 
patch to the Public Ledger (Philadelphia) 
informs us in detail of the mutiny at 
Southampton of three hundred volunteers 
about to be shipped to France. The men 
absolutely refused to embark, on the 
ground that their ultimate destination was 
the Black Sea and that they would not 
fight the Russians. The Government, we 
are told, "will deal firmly with the matter." 
The alleged Italian default may of course 
simply be connected with an efl:'ort to bol- 
ster Italian exchange in England, but it 
may have a far more serious significance. 
If the powers of financial imperialism that 
have so long ruled every country in the 
world have indeed reached the point where, 
on the one hand, even the debtor govern- 
ments cannot or will not pay their claims, 
and where, on the other, the ])eople refuse 
to be coaxed or bullied or coerced into 
fighting for the enforcement of their claims, 
then it is high time for them to begin to 
think in terms of a new situation. 'i'he 
])roblem of the war debts has got to be 
faced squarely and fearlessly. — The (New 
York) Nation. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone, Seneca 48. 

THOS. CONWAY, Secretary. 

ED HICKS, Treasurer. 

Branches: 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 74 Bridge Street 

Phone, 428-W. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 332 Banks Avenue 

Phone, Broad 131. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

Phone, S. C. 1599. 

TOLEDO, Ohio 704 Summit Street 

Phone, Main 4519. 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1012 Superior Avenue 

Phone, Main 866. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone, South 598. 

DETROIT, Michigan 44 Shelby Street 

Phone, Cadillac 543. 

CHICAGO. Ill 332 N. Michigan Ave. 

Phone, Central 8460. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 122y2 Main Street 

Phone, 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street 

Telephone Seneca 896. 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary. 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 406 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 85 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, HI 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO. Ohio 704 Summit Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARI 
LIEF STATIONS ON 
Marine 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROI' 

Relief 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
rmluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mlcfi. 



NE HOSPITAL AND RE- 

THE GREAT LAKES. 
Hospitals: 

r, MICH., CLEVELAND. O. 
Stations: 

Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Oswego, N. Y. 

Port Huron, Mich. 

Manitowoc. W's. 

Marquette. Mich. 

Milwaukee. Wis. 

Saginaw, Mich. 

Sandusky, O. 

Sault Ste. Marie. Mich. 

Sheboygan. Wis. 

Superior, Wis. 

Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA. B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA. Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 28» 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% 3rd Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 876 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal. ..613 Beacon Street. P. O. Box 57« 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 
SAN PEDRO. Cal P. O. Box 64 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 13H 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters. 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C). Canada P. O. Box 9«« 

KETCHIKAN. Alaska P. O. Box 201 

PETERSBURG Alasks 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA. Ore P- O. Box ISI 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION. 

PAN FRANCISCO Cal .9 Mission Street 

Plinne Sutter 2205 



MARINE FIREMEN'S AND OILERS' UNION OF 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

VANCOUVER. B. C -129 Columbia Avenue 

VICTORIA. B. C 1424 Government Street 



B. C. COAST STEWARDS. 
VANCOUVUR, B. C B»» RJoh«rd» Utrs.t 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




The Lynn (Mass.) Shoe Manu- 
facturers' Association and the United 
Shoe Workers of America completed 
an agreement whereby more than 
12.000 workers will receive a 15 per 
cent, increase in wages, with a forty- 
four-hour week of five working days. 

One reason why the New York 
J'ublic Service Commission finds dif- 
ficulty in securing employes posess- 
ing a knowledge of technical mat- 
ters is shown in a letter to the 
commission in which the writer de- 
clines a position that would pay 
$75.08 a month. The writer says 
window cleaners are paid a higher 

wage. 

Nearly 3,000 machinists at Akron, 
Ohio, have suspended work to se- 
cure improved working conditions. 
Practically every shop in Akron but 
one is aflfected. The demands in- 
clude the 44-hour week, wage in- 
creases and the abolition of the pre- 
mium and bonus systems which were 
efTfectively used for some time in 
keeping the machinists unorganized. 

The Crane company of Chicago 
has adopted a new scheme to check 
up undesirables. It forwarded bal- 
lots with self-addressed envelopes to 
its 7,000 striking employes, with a 
request that they vote on the ques- 
tion whether the "works should 
again be reopened." The company 
can now check up 'the names it 
forwarded ballots to with the re- 
turned ballots. 

It is possible that navy officers 
will be now called upon to serve as 
the H. C. of L. "goat." They are 
resigning from the navy because 
their salaries arc still paid on the 
1908 basis. One Navy Department 
official is quoted as saying that if 
Congress does not act "the navy 
faces the awkward choice of re- 
taining a large number of officers 
against their will, with subsequent 
discontent and dissatisfaction, or ac- 
cepting the resignations." As yet 
these officials have not been charged 
with profiteering because they de- 
mand salaries that will meet pres- 
ent living costs. 

Industry is more deadly than mod- 
ern war was one of the points made 
by C. W. Price, general manager of 
the National Safety Council, in a 
speech in Wilmington, Delaware. He 
said that during the 19 months of 
*the war, of the 2,000,000 American 
soldiers who went overseas, 50,150 
were killed or died from battle 
wounds, while at home in industrial 
life in the same 19. months, 200,000 
were injured and 126,654 men, wo- 
men and children were killed through 
accidents. He pointed out that 
every day of the 19 months 220 
men, women and children were 
killed by accident in the United 
States. 

"Patriotic" business men of Don- 
ora, Pennsylvania, have gotten them- 
selves in an awful mess in their de- 
sire to block trade unionism. They 
signed a sort of an ultimatum to 
Organizer Feeney inviting him to 
leave town. But Feeney, as his 
name implies, has some fighting 
blood in his veins and refused to 
quit. Miners and other trade union- 
ists in the district placed a boycott 
on Donora and began to spend their 
money elsewhere. The business men 
have now "fired" their president, who 
is charged with being responsible for 
llic mess, and all hands are making 
goo-goo eyes at the trade unionists, 
who are invited to patronize Dnnora 
business men. 



Office Phone Elliott 1196 



E>tAbUshed 1S9« 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Date Methods In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

COMPASSES AUJUSTEIi 

712-13-14 SEABOARD BLDG. FOURTH and PIKE STREETS 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Sjul C\IC X7 X> ^ See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
"* V-f ^ Hi IV »j box in which you are served. 




Seattle, Wash , Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Posiofflce, letters aaareesed In care of 
me Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
iiui oe Held lunger than 3U days from 
ijaie of delivery. If members are unuuifc 
i.< call ui liave tneir man lorAvaraeo 
uaririg tnat period, the> snouiu noliij 
me Agent to bold irAiii unm airiveu. 

Aase, Olaf Anderson, Sextes 

Abrahanison, HelftanAndersson, Gustav 
Abolin, K. Andersen Alf. -1638 

Abi-aliamson, John Anderson, Albert 
Anderson John (6) Andersen, Olaf -20OT 
Adams, A. D. Andersen, Herman 

Anderson Adolf (4) Anderson. John N. 
Anderson Harry (2) Anderson, Julius 
Anderson, Chris Andewig, H. 
Anderson, John -ISOOAntonsen, Martln(3) 
Anilresen, Jorson Akcrstrom, O. R. 

Antonsen, Anton G. 

Alquist, Cris 

Alexis, H. 

Aspengreen, E. 



•Anderson, Albert 
I H. (2) 

Anderson, Charles 
lAndersson W. (2) 
I Anderson Rasmus 

Bang, Oskar 

Backlund, K. 

Backman, Axel 

Back.-^lrom. K. 

Belmont, Joe 
I Berg, Wm. 
I Beversdorf, E. 



Bjorkstrom, A. 
Bloomgren, Adolf 
Bodie, Wm. 
Boyle, James E. 
Bolstad, Alf. 
Borgan, Arne 
Brown, Calvin H. 



Bertleson, Bertie J. Bratson, Jos. 
Bcrgkvest, Axel Bruce, Albert 

Berentsen, A. M. Brun, Dick 
Berkland, Hans J. Burgiss, J. W. 
Bibbs, Golden S. Bund, Nils 
Bjorseth, K. 



Burggraf, Albert 
Carlson, C. A. 
Carlson, Chas. H. 
Carlson, Gunner 
Carstensen, Carsten 
Casperson, Carl 
Carruthers, M. 
Clausen, Christ. 
454 Corron, George R. 

Carlson, John -1586 Cochrane, Robt. 

Carlson. Ingwald Cortes, P. 
iDahl, Ole Ditmanson, D. 

Davies, Chester O. Dreyer, J. 



Campbell, John 
Camino, C. C. 
Carlson, Herbert 
Carlsen, Gust. 
Carlin, Carl A. 
Cartvelt, C. C. 
Carlson, Gus. 
Carlson, Oscar 



Davies, E. R. 

Delaney, John 

Dehler, J. 

Dekker, D. 

Enoksen, A. 

Eliassen, H. O. 

Elstad, John 

F.lze. Cn rl 

Ellis. J. 

EUing. Alfred 

Foicvaag, C. 

Fair, Phalti 

Feedge J. A. 

Ferguson, Robt. 

Felsch, C. 

Flatten, James G 

Flemming, M. 

Gabrielsen, P. 

Gamber, J. J. 

Gerson, Chas. 

Gibler, Karl 

Hanson, Olaf 

Hanson, Andrew 

Hansen, John P. 

Hanson, Josef 

Hanson, Peter 

Hanson, G. E. 

Hanson, John 

Halley, "Wm. 
I H a ra Id son . Jolian 
I Halseth, Ed. 

Inglebretsen, Olaf 

Iverson, Andrew 

Jacobson, Johan 

Janson, E. A. 

Jansen, Emit 

Jensen, Nils 

Jensen, Henry 

Jensen, Hans 

Johnson, A. W. 

Johansen, Ed. 

Johnsen, Jacob 

Johansen, J. 

Johnson. Peter M 

Johansen, Karl -2127 

Karlstrand, G. Kines, 

Kastl. H. 



] )iin\vci()dy, George 
Douglas, W. 
Dunn, W. G. 
Dutton, H. 
Elisen, Sam 
Evsner, Ingvar 
Erikson, Erik 
Erikson, Otto 
Erickson, K. 
Erickson, J. R. 
Fox. Andrew 
Folks. H. 
Fuve, A. M. 
Fiiidge, E. "W^ 
Fianson, O. 
Fredrecksen, F. 

Groth, Karl 
Grunbock, John 
Gusjoos, O. 
Gustafsson, O. 
Hasselborg, Gus. 
Henrekson, E. 
Hendreckson, H. 
Hoik, Geo. 
Holmquist, 
Holland, J. 
Hill, F. 
Hilliard, C. 
Hunter, G. 



Einor 



R. 
H. 



2313 



Isakson, Karl 
Iverson, Ole 
Johnson, E. 
Johnson, Peter 
Johnsen, A. 
Johanson, Jakob 
Johnson, G. 
.Tohnstone, Walter 
.Johansen, Karl 
Johnsen, John 
Johnsen. Adler -256 
Johanssen. Erik 
Johnson, P. 



J. 



Karlson, K. 
Karlsen, O. 
Korsama, N. 
Kalllo, F. 
Karlsen, E. 
Kempson, M. 
Larsen, Hjalmer 
Ijarsen, Segurd 
Larsen, G. 
Lampl, F. 
Darsen. Alex 
Larsen, C. A. 
Larson, E. G. 
T^rson. Fred 
Lte. C. 
Leskenen, F. 



J. H. 
Knudson, A. J 
Koppen, O. 
Kother, H. 
Koppen. B. 
Kristiansen, .T. 
Karhanan. E. 
Kutin, John 
Leeuwen, A 
Lul, T. 
Leer.avacg. TI. 
Lldston. C. 
7x)rKeman, F. 
Lund. Wni. 
T.,uetter, T. 
T..nndberg, E. 
Lundgren, 0. 
Ludersson, W. 



V. 



■1240 



John 

C. 

C. 



Mortcnsen, K. A. 
Malhesen, Segurd 
Mortenscn, H. 
Maitindale, 
Mardinsen, 
Malmiivist. 
Manus, Johanus 
Mordison, A. 
Malone, B. 
Mercer, H. 
Meokelson, J. 
Melby, V. 
Meloen, Harry 
Melder, Albert 
Meskelsson, Erik 
Mikkelsen. K. -16 



Emil 
Carl 
A. C. 
A. "W. 

John 
Robert 

Chris -13' 
Nlc 

Albert 

Adolph 
Ferdinand 

Laurits 

Arne 

Robert 



Nelson, 
Nelson, 
Nelson, 
Nelson, 
Nelson, 
Nelson, 
Olsen, 
Olsen, 
Olsen, 
Olson, 
Olsen, 
Olnes, 
Olsen, 
Olsen, 
Pakkl. Emil 
Paaso, A. 
Paterson, P. 
Paklesen, K. 
Permin, Jens C. 
Pederson, E. P. 
Petterson, Adolf 
Pederson, Carl 
Pes toff, S. 
Peterson, Karl E. 
Rasmussen, Christ 
Rantenen, H. 
Reenhold, Gustov 
Robenson, W. N. 
Rosenberg, Adolf 
Sandberg, Otto 
Sandel, F. S. 
Sather, H. 
Sassi, W. 
Schmidt, W. 
Schuur, H. 
Seppala. Emil 
Seyfried, M. 
Shoberg, J. 
Simmons, John 
Smith, Emil 
Sndwick, Ben 
Sorenson, H. 
Solberg, Olaf 
Taice, John J. 
Tapper, A. E. 
Tessabia, B. 
Thorsen. Herman 
Thammeson, Ole 
Thorsen, Hans 
Thorsen, Victor 
Uhlnes, F. 
Vesgood, Jens 
Ward, D. 
Waggoner, Sam 
Walters. Al 
Walters, Ted 
Watt, John B. 
Weld, L. A. 
West, J. N. 
Winter, Theodore 



Miller, Frank 

Miller, A. M. 

Morrison, J. D. 

Morken, M. L. 

Moore, J. 

Morrison, Wm. 

Morgan, Wm. 

Moor. Thos. 

Moen, Robt. 

MacKay, James 

McGuire. T. 

McKenzle, D. J. 

McGuire, J. 

MacKay, Thos. 

McGregor, J. 
;2flMcCoy, James 

Nellsen. Axel 

Noren. B. 

Nord, C. W. 

Nilsen, Andreas 

Nilsen, Hans L. 

Nimen, August 
9 Olsen, Hans 

Olsson, C. 

Olsen, Carl 

Olson, John 

Otterspear, Wm. 

Overland, Oskar 

O'Keefe, T. F. 

Pearson, Gustov 
Pederson, John 
Pettersen, Bjorne 
Pedersen, Karl 
Pelta, Henry 
Peterson, Ole 
Plantiko. W. 
Powell, H. 
Porter, A. 
Punls, A. 
Rosenthal, W. 
Rohman, G. 
Rosenblad. Albin 
Rund, Nils 

Sorenson, Tom 
Sorger, E. 
Strand, Alfred 
Stentz, P. 
Steffensen, S. 
St. Clair, Thomas 
Stratton, M. 
Suominen, F. 
Sundby, Alfred 
Sverdrup, Thorwald 
Svendson, John A. 
Swanson, Wm. 
Syverson, Oskar 

Thorn, Arvid 
Tonneson, Anton 
Tomqulst, Henry 
Troverson, Louis 
Tyrrell, J. 
Tuorilla, J. 



Voldby, P. 
Wilson, Gus 
Wilson. C. 
Wlthberg, Alf 
Williams. Lloyd 
Wilhelmsen. Martin 
Wirta, Geo. 
Wullum, J. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 



Anderson. Andrew 
Andersen, Olaf 
Rarrot. G 
Brandt, Arv. 
Bnrmelster. T. 
Brun, Mattta 
Brant, Max 
Brandt, H. 
Carlson. 0«''. 
Cormack, W. C. 
Dlschler. P. 
Gomes. M G. 
Medrlr-k, Jnok 
Jansson, John 
-lansson, -T. A. 
Jensen, Joe 
Johanssen, John F. 
Johannessen, Alf. 
Johannessen. .Jonas 
Johnson. Hllmar 
Khamp. S. 
KInntinen. AnttI 
'Co»'Ti<»<J'- .T p 
Lutke, F. C. A. 
Mnlkoff. Pet^T 
Malmberg. E. 
Martinson. Adolph 



Melners. Herman 
Miller. F. W. 
Miller, M'alter 
Uurk. Chas. 
■ i'"'iiian. I. 
Nvatrom. R. 
Olesen. W. 
Olson. A. 
Olson, W. 
Olsen. Alf 
Patterson. E. G. 
Pedersen. N B 
Petersen, Axel 
Rahlf, J. 
RIsenlus. Sven 
Pnaenhla''. Otto 
Rubins, C. A. 
Pmvth. J. B 
.<?odprlund. t'no 
Rtalt, Axel 
Stanbeck, A. 
Sven son. R 
SiindrjuNt. Walter W 
Torln. Gustaf A. 
Vnlfors. ArvId 
Wllllama, T. C. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



T- II. Lindross, formerly on 
schooner "Commerce," is rcquesteil 
to call at the office of the U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 9-10-19 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER & HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIQ STORES 

•tor« No. 1 — Cor. Main and First 

Store No. 2 — Westlake and Pins 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Creamatory and Columbarium In 

Connection 



Broadway at Ollva St. 



East IS 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. 8. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats. Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Room 4140 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Sid* 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way 8EATTLK 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

118-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Poi« 
SEATTLE. WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



VESTENHAVER BROS. 

CUT-RATE STORE 

$5.00 Less on a Suit or Overcoat. 
Shirts, Shoes, Oil Skins, Rubber Boots. 
Overalls, Underwear, Sox, Pants. 

We make a special effort to carry 
In stock everything for 

SAILORS and MILL MEN 

UNION STORE 

208 East Heron St., - Aberdeen 

Between Rc.x and Wear Theaters 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCX OF 

UNION MADJS CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS. SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES. OVERALLS. SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - Absrdasn 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measur* 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F. Sts., Aberdeen, Wash. 
1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 2(3 



»» 



"Ole and Charley 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors' Rest" 

cigars^ Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST.. HOQUIAM, WASH. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 




Poverty 
is A Crime! 

IT isn't a crime to be poor, any moro 
than it is to be murdered. The poverty- 
Btricken man is not a criminal. He 
Sil a Tictim of a crime for which others 
aa well as himself are responiible. Henry 
George 33 yearn aso eave a lectnre be- 
fore the Knights of Labor the title of 
which was 

"The Crime of Poverty*' 

It h&a since become a classic and haa 
touched the spark of ambition in the 
liearts of thousands of men and inspired 
them to better things. 
You can get a copy of this gripping lec- 
ture, well printed in a neat, cloth-bound 
book, and THE PUBLIC. A Journal of 
Democracy, for 13 weeks for only 63 
cents. Let THE PUBLIC be your in- 
terpreter, as it is for many of the great 
liberal thinkers of the day: Brand Whit- 
lock, U. S. Minister to Belgium; Wm. 
C. Colver, Federal Trade Commissioner; 
Ray Standard Baker, and hundreds of 
others. 

Frank P. Walsh, Joint-Chair- 
man of the National War Labor 
Board says: 

Every worker in A»ierica should 
be a subscriber to THE PUBLIC. 
All lovers of justice are striving 
toward the same end. THE PUB- 
LIC points the way. 
Write your name and address clearly on 
the margin, attach 65 cents, stamps or 
money order, and with the first number 
of THE PUBLIC we will send you a 
cloth-bound and handsomely printed 
copy of "The Crime of PoTerty." 

THE PUBLIC 

122 E. 37th St., New York City 



Portland, Or., Letter List 



Amundsen, Ben 
Anderson, Albert 
Anderson. C. 
Ahren, Wm. J. 
Backman. Peter W. 
Bieler. B. 
Bohm, Vranz 
Boyle. H. 

Christensen, E. H. 
Chrlstensen, H. P. 
Cunningham, G. F. 
Dahl, Louis 
De Long, K. 
Duret, J. E. 
Ellegaard, M. 
Elliot, Austin A. 
Erickson. Jolin E. 
Guildersen. W. E. 
Geiger, Joe 
Graaf, John D 
Hanson, August 

-1134 
Harding, Ellis 
Hartman. Fritz 
Hauschild. B. 
Heino. Gust. 
Hellman, H. W. 
Henriksen. Geo. 
Herman, David 
Hickey. E. J. 
Hogstrom. Karl I. 
Holmes. George 
Huber, C. L. 
Johansson, Charles 

-2407 
Jorgenson, Earl 
Jensen. H. T. 
Johnson, C \. 
Jordan, H. S. 
TCase. A. 
Knofsky. E. W. 
Kristiansen, Wm. A. 
Laatzen, Hugo 
Larsen, C. J. 



Larsen. Hans 

Larson, C. -1632 
Learch, Paul 
Leskinen. F. 
Matson, Hemming A 
Matson. H. -1808 
Melgant, F. 
Michaels. R. 
Miller, Victor 
Miller, Harry 
Mlkkelaen. Harry 
Murphv. Frnnftf Leo 
Newkirk, Clifford 
Nordman, Alelc 
Nielsen, .Tens 
Nllsen, Chas. 
Nelson, Harry 
OellTtB. Wm. A. 
OhLson, J. A. 
Olson, John 
Olson, Chas. 
Paulsson, Herman 
Petersen. Anton 

-1 67."; 
Petesen, Knut 
Petter. G. 
Rensmand. Robert 
Ross, Geo. 
Rulsgaard, Soren 
Ruud, Ole H. 
Rytko. Otto 
Samueisen. S 
Schmeltning, Max M. 
Schroder, August 
Schultz, F. E. 
Sibley, Milton 
Slebert Gust 
Steenson, Edward 
Rwenson, C. E. 
Thoresen, Inerwa'd 
Tuhkanon. Johan .1. 
■VVoIdL Prank 
Wood, E. E. 



San Pedro Letter List 



Amesen, Frank 
Anderson, P. A. 

-1695 
Anderson. Sven 
Andree, E. A. 
Billington, T. A. 
Bergh, B. 
Brandes, W. M. 
Breien. Hans 
Corregsona. Vincent 
r>avis, Orviiie 
Deneen. Frank A. 
Edmonds, Jack 
Ellingsen, Wm. 
Emmerz, A.. 
Bvensen, Ed. 
Exlesan, Herman 
Falvig, John 
Fisher, W. -707 
Folke, Harry 
Frank, Paul 
Franzell, A. H. 
Ganser, Joe 
Grassen, "Van 
Gregory, Joe 
Gunderson, B. C. 
Gunnerud Torvald 
Hansen. Olaf 

Bernard 
John 
Johan 



Chas. L. 
Henry 



Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Artur 
Hansen, 
Heesho. 
Hill, Fred A 
Holmes, Frank 
Hubner, Carl F. 
.Tohansen, Carl 
.Tohansen, Anton 
Johnson, Matt 
.Tohnson. L. T. - 
Johannson, N. A. 
.Tohanson, .Tobn 
Johanson, Fritz 



Leisener, A. 
Linden, M. 
Lindholm, Chas. 
Lindstrom, .T A. 
Ljunggren, Albin 
Lonngren, Carl 
Magnusen, Karl 
Malmberg. Ellis 
Martin, George 
Mathis, Hartley 
Matsen, Hemming 
Meyer, Claus 
Monterro. .John 
Nelson, Chas. R. 
Nielsen, S. 
Ole, Olesen 
Olin, Emil 
Olsen, Martin 
Osterhaff, Henry 
Pedersen, Halver 
Petersen, Hugo 
Raaum. Henry 
Rasmussen, S. A. 
Reith, C. 
Repson, Ed. 
Roed, H. 
Roed. L. A. 
Rosenblnd. Billy 
Ross, Wm. 
Snmson. Loiii.q 
Sanders, Chas. 
Schmitd. Louis 
Shpild. Oscnr 
Rindblom, Ernest W. 
Skogberg, J. 
Sinehorg. Ola^" B 
Snarberg. Charles 
Sternberg, Alf. 
Stenroos, A. W. 
Stone, Victor 
!Strom, C. L. 
Sturankesken, M. 
Suominen, Oscar 
Swanson, Ben 




r 



SHARE /IT^/THE VICTORY 

/save FOR YOVRCOVNTRY '^^ SAVE FOR YOVRSELF 

'Wy war^savings stamps 



l-^ 



Hi'.'-cll Cctfirv, 



CARRY ON! 

Uncle Sam is releasing from his service the men who went "over 
there" to free the world from autocracy. Thousands of soldiers are 
daily receiving their honorable discharges; they pocket their pay, 
bid farewell to their comrades, and sally forth — civilians. 

There is one army, however, which must not be demobilized. 
That is the army of War-Savings Stamp buyers. More recruits are 
needed to carry on the campaign of readjustment which follows 
the signing of the armistice. 

The army of fighters has achieved its purpose. 

The army of savers must remain in "action." 

"Carry on" to a lasting peace under the banner of W. S. S.! 



Johanson, J. A. 
Johnson, J. E. 
.lonasen. J. 
Jones, Erest L. 
Knllio, Frank 
Kind, Herman 
Kolodzieg, George 
Kristoffersen, A. 
Larsen, J. -1542 
Lechemus. Bill 



Thompson, Alex. 

Thompson, Maurice 

Toivonen, F. 

Vizcarra, Oscar 

Wrigg, F. 

Wilhalmson, Karl 
J.Wahi. J. 
B.Yarvinen, V. H. 

Teaman, W. E. 

Zunderer, Heo 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Alfredsen, Adolf Marks, Walter 
Anderson, Harold F.Martenson, Adolp 
Carlstrand Gustaf Martinsson, E. 
Houge. Anton Meyer, Karl 

Kennedy, James ReaNielsen, Alf. W. 
Kennedy, Jas. Rea Nelson, C. W. 

(Package) Olsen. Robert 

Lapauble, Jean Reilley, Ralph 

Pierre Leyfried, M. -29C2 

Magail, Michael 



You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stlrrlnc times 
in the Nation. TTnder government cen- 
sorship It iB Increasingly dlfflcult for 
the average man to (ret tb" r<»al mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented «t TVash- 
tngton and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Follette Is making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax biir- 
dens from tTie common people and place 
them where they belong — on exces? 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and Incomes. Because of this he Is be- 
Ing attacked more bitterly than any 
other m»ri in pnblle i"« 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 P^r Year — Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine, Madison, vvis. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

I am representing the Union men 
who are entitled to salvage and 
members of the crew of the fol- 
lowing vcsseLs. In most cases ac- 
tion has commenced. In some cases 
ihe funds have been recovered. In 
others they are readily recoverable 
upon filing power of attorney form 
with me. Address this office by letter. 
"Princeton" vs. "Ardmore," |7500 re- 
ceived. "Gulf of Mexico"- vs. Bark 
"Portugal," $5000. "Gulf Coast" vs 
"Boxleaf," settled. "Argonaut" vs. 
"Jason," funds received. "Iroquois" 
vs. "Skinner," settled, crews share 
$12,250. "Brasos" vs. "Iroquois," set- 
tled. "Maine" vs. "Tlicresa Ac- 
comme.'" "Oskawa" vs. "Westgrove." 
"Buda 2" vs. "Western Star." "St. 
Charles" vs. "Monte Cenis." "Flor- 
ence Olsen" vs. "Marina." Flor- 
ence Olsen" vs. "Clarcmont." "Alli- 
ance" vs. "Belvernon." "Donnelly" 
vs. "Irish." "Anacortes" vs. "S. O. 
Barge No. 95." "Fred W. Wellor" 
vs. "Overbrook." "Neptunas" vs. 
"Panama." "Quincy" v«. "Transpor- 
tation." "Merman Frash" vs. "Bril- 
liant." "O'Neil" vs. "Oregon." Bark 
"Superior." "Pan American" vs. 
"Santa Rita." "St. Cliarles" vs, 
"Tea." Tug "Navigator" vs. "Edgar 
H. Vance." "Tunica" v.s. "Neppon- 
ler." "Lake Charles" vs. "Cantiwo." 
Silas B. Axtell, 1 Broadway. Nci\ 
York City. 8-20-18 



Ho 



me 



N 



cvn 



The initiative and referendum Con- 
stitutional amendment will be in- 
voked for the first lime at the next 
session of the Legislature by the 
Massachusetts Forestry A.ssociation. 
in an effort to have the State pur- 
chase and develop idle lands. 

Some of the largest quantitier; of 
foodstuff's found during the course 
of the inspection of dismantled 
breweries, warehouses and old build- 
ings in sections of New York City 
were more than a half-billion eggs in 
cases, over 44,000,000 pounds of cot- 
fee, 15,000,000 pouiuls of fresh meat, 
10,000,000 pounds of rice and 62,000,- 
000 pounds of beans in bags. 

The Communist party of America, 
which recently held its convention 
in Chicago, belongs, accordin.g to 
the editor of The Communist, the 
official organ of the party, to the 
same group of International So- 
cialists as the parly headed by 
Bela Kun in Huu,gary, the BoLshe- 
viki of Russia, tlie Socialists of 
Italy, and the Communist party of 
Germany. 

Resolutions introduced at the meet- 
ing of the Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Firemen and Enginemen in 
Denver, Colo., presented a plan for 
establishing on a gigantic iscale co- 
operative stores for the benefit of 
the railroad brotherhoods. The ulti- 
mate idea of the plan is not only to 
act as a distributor and eliminate the 
middleman, but also to obtain land 
for the production of produce. 

The women of Indianapolis have 
organized themselves into the In- 
dianapolis Housewives' League to 
investigate profiteering, and especially 
the charges against produce commis- 
sion merchants and owners of apart- 
ments. It will also supply prompt 
and regular information on the price 
of commodities. And the women of 
New York formed the Women's Na- 
tional Economic Committee for the 
purpose of enlisting, within a month, 
the women of the country (22,000,^ 
000) to fight profiteering, each woman 
in her own locality. 

The New York World says that 
that recent race conflict in Wash- 
ington did not reach the stage of 
a serious, bloody riot. Five or 
more persons were killed in widely 
separated sections, but the outbreak 
never involved the better element of 
either race. The threat of armed 
force, commanded by a regular army 
officer, and the wise counsel of a 
few leading Negroes stopped what 
promised to be a dreadful race war. 
The Washington riot was started by 
irresponsible boys and soldiers who 
took the law in their own hands to 
punish Negroes for a series of at- 
tacks on women in and about the 
capital. 

It costs some money to fit one's 
self and family out for a camping 
trip. A tent, a gun, blankets, and 
cooking utensils, especially adapted 
to roughing it, and one or two pack 
animals are needed. It is not every 
working class family that can afford 
such an outfit, especially as it will 
be used only for a week or two, and 
then laid by for a year. The Co- 
operative Campers' Association of 
Seattle have solved the problem by 
buying all these things in common, 
and renting them to themselves. The 
society was originally limited to fif- 
teen, but finally the co-operative 
spirit killed excbisivencss and now 
the society is unliiiiitcd in its mcr.i- 
bership. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Domestic and Naval 



The Bureau of Navigation, Depart- 
ment of Commerce, reports 240 sail- 
ing, steam, gas, and unrigged ves- 
sels of 387,151 gross tons built in 
the United States and officially num- 
bered during the month of July, 1919. 

The Colonna Marine Railway Co., 
of Norfolk, Va., has placed an order 
lor a marine railway of 2000-ton 
lifting capacity with the Crandall 
Engineering Co., Boston. Tliis will 
be the Colonna Co.'s fifth marine 
railway of 2000-ton capacity. 

According to a report current in 
the steel market, sixty Lake-built 
boats of VV'elland Canal size will be 
lengthened at Atlantic coast ship- 
yards. If possible the steel accumu- 
lated by the Emergency Fleet Cor- 
poration will be utilized to carry out 
the alterations. 

The International Shipbuilding 
Corporation of Pascagoula is stated 
to have secured orders for the con- 
struction of -six ID.OOO-ton dead- 
weight cargo boats. The price men- 
tioned is in the neighborhood of 
$1,200,000 for each ship, which 
sounds very cheap indeed, as other 
builders are known to be standing 
firm on at least $150 per ton dead- 
weight boat of this tonnage. 

Rear A'dmiral T. J. Cowie of the 
Pay Corps of the navy has prepared 
a bill for consideration by Congress 
for incrasing the pay of all officers 
and men of the armed service of 
the Government. Under the bill, all 
officers, active and retired, of these 
services would receive an increase 
of 30 per cent, per annum, and the 
pay of all enlisted men, active and 
retired, would be increased 50 per 
cent. 

Of 512 steamshii)s requisitioned 
by the United States Shipping Board 
during the war emergency 478, with 
a total deadweight tonnage of nearly 
3,000,000, have already been released, 
the board announces. The remaining 
thirty-four, approximating 300,000 
deadweight tons, will be released as 
soon as resurveys can be completed. 
Among the vessels released, but 
which have not yet been turned 
over to their owners, are the Pacific 
liners "Matsonia," "Maui" and 
"Sierra," and the Mexican gulf liners 
"Henry R. Mallory," "El Orient," 
"El Sol," "Calamares" and "Pas- 
tores." 

Balboa and Cristobal seem to be 
regular havens of refuge for Ship- 
ping Board vessels that are com- 
pelled to put back to port on account 
of engine or machinery difTiculties. 
From two to three reports have been 
sent here regularly for months past 
conveying the information that some 
craft has put back or arrived with 
some sort of trouble. A recent 
lame duck report announced that the 
Ferris wooden steamer "Afalkey" had 
started from Cristobal for Grimsby 
with cargo from Seattle, but had re- 
turned on account of broken feed 
pipes. Shipping men here say that 
the crippled ships are like automo- 
biles. They usually ride nicely along 
the most difficult stages of the jour- 
".ey and then break down where it 
is comparatively an easy matter to 
make some port near by. No one 
seems to know why the ships are 
meeting with such an amount of 
trouble, but the general opinion is 
that some were built in too much of 
a hurry, or at least that the parts 
had been rushed through the fac- 
tories after lax inspection. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, CaL 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH. Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30, 1919. 

Assets $60,509,192.14 

Deposits 57,122,180.22 

CapiUl Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,387,01 1 .92 

Employees' Pension Fund 306,852.44 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

QF.O. TOURNT, Vlce-Pres. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vlce-Pres. and Ca«hUr 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary 
WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 
GOODFELLOW, EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, 
General Attorneys 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

B. T. KRUSB HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 



E. A. CHRISTENSON 



L. S. SHERMAN 



San Francisco Letter List 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for tliree 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Members whose maU is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver, Business Manager, The 
Seamen's Journal, 59 Clay Street, San 
Francisco, Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Aberg, Einar 
Adams, Arch 
Adamson, Hj. 
.\damsson, John 
Aguilar, Alf. 
Aimer, Robert 
Akerman, V. 
Alto, H. 
Alto, W. 
.\ninell, Albert 
Andersen, Adolf 



Andersson, C. -797 
Anderson. John A. 
Anderson, John F. 
Anderson, Edw. 
Andersson, Chaheles 
Andersson, O. L. 
Andersson, C. -2185 
Andersson, Arthur 
\ngelback, Geo. 
Antonsen, Marias 
Ardt, Anton 



Andirs.-u, Carlos T. Aro, Kalle 
Andersen, F. -1473 Ask, E. A. 
Andersen, N. -197»Augustine^ 



Anth. 



Anderson, Wm. 
Andersson, A. O. 

Balco, Juan 
Baumont, H. 
Boke, Carl 
Benson. S. -986 
Benluso Manl. 
Uersstrom, 1. M. 
BerKiiiann, W. 
Buselin, Kdw. 
Billington Martin 
Bjurk\ ist, Kagn 
Bjorka, Hans K. 
Bjorklund, G. 
Bjorn, Kristian 
Bleasing, W. 
Blomborg, Gustaf 
Blomgren, C. A. 



Austed, Barney 



Bode, Wilhelm 
Borjeseii, L. 
Bosshard, Henry 
Brady. B. 
Bradsberry, G. -- 
Brain, Louis 
Browne, Chas. B 
Bruuin, E. -2583 
Bryant, J. S. 
Bryning, W. 
Bugel, J. 
Bunting, A. 
Burrgraf, A. 
Byars, Terry 
Bye, K. 
Bye, Alf. 



461 



Cameron, James 
Garden, Joe 
t'ase, Half E. 
Carlsen, Julius 
Carlson, Andrew 
Carlson, Carl 
Carlson, E. R. 
Carlson, 10. S. 
Carroll, James 
CatechlB, L. 
Christensen, H. C. 
Christensen. R. H. 



Christenson, Einar 
Clark, Chas. R. 
Clausen, Lewis 
Clausen, Louis 
Cleaver, Hugo 
Collins, Frank 
Conigan, R. B. 
1769Conrad, P. W. 
Cordey. Allan 
Correro. T. R. 
Cox, R. H. 
Crowley, Fred 



Dahler, H. N. 
Dahlstrom, Sven 
Danielsen, Henry 
Danielson. Harry 
Daskeland, N. N. 
Davis, Warren 
Dawson, Herebrt 
Delahanty, J. J. 
Devenay, Ed. 

Edler, Fritz 
Edwards, Ole 
Esenas, Nils 
Ehlers, Heinie 
Eide, J. -962 
Elliot, Pietro 
Einard, J. 
Einartsen. Hans 
Elo, Frank 

Fagerly, O. 
Falbom, Albln 
Felsch, C. 
Fernandez. G. L. 
FIgved. Sigurd 
Fitstiurg, Gordon 
Fliiikenberg, F. 
Fjellnian, Geo. 

Gailunas, Anton 
Gans, Frans 
Gasck, Willy 
Gibson, C. R. 
Goodmans. G. 
Greenfield, J. Wm 
Gronroos, John 

Haak, R. 
TIakala, J. 
Hakala, Paavo 
Hakala, Paul 
Halley. W. 
Halvorsen, Chris. 
Halvorsen, Torlelf 
Hamilton. W^. G. 
Hammer, Carl 
Hammerqulst. A. 
Hamren. T. G. 
Hannelius, R. F. 
Hanschman, W. 
Hannesen, K. J. 
Hatispn, Hans P. 
Hansen, Oskar 
Hansen. R. C. A. 
Hansen, J. 
Hansen, Kristen 
Hansen, H. M. 



Didriksen, Martin 
DriscoU, John 
Douglas, W. F. 
Drysdale, H. 
Dumas, Clifford 
Dumas, J. 
Dunham, Chas. 
Dunkel, E. 



Engstrom. Ben 
Engelbregtsen, C. 
Erbe, Lewis 
Erikson, A. -571 
tCrikson. Chas. 
Esplund, Fred 
Essen, C. A. 
Evenson, A. 
Evensen, Martin 

Forslund, Fred 
Foss, L. 
Frizzell, R. L. 
Fredriksen, Herman 
Frizzelle, .lark 
Frost, Peter 
Fuller, Geo. 



Gronroos, Elbin 
Gullakser, Hans 
Grussman, G. A. 
Gundersen, Andreas 
Gutmann, Paul C. 
. M. -1123 



Heaps, James 
Held^n. Harry 
Heldahl, T. 
Henrikson, J. L. M. 
Henriksson. W. 
Hermansson. Frits 
Henze, -Adalbert 
Henzengo, Cornelio 
Hewell, 
Hicks, Jim 
HlUi. Albert 
HIngren, J. HJ. 
Hjerling, HJ. 
Holmgren. G. J. 
Holland, D. 
HoUingsworth, W. C. 
Holmberg, Chas. 
Horner, A. 
Hunter, G. H. 
Hugo, O. -1934 



Hansen, R. Hubertz, Emil 

Hanson, Frank Hy, Ben 

Hanson, Carl 

Ingebretsen, Alf. Iversen, Iver 

Jacobson, -241S 
.lacobson, Jacob 
Jaeobson, E. 
JaUerholm, Hans 
Jahnke, Paul 
.Jakullis, Johinn 
Janson, C. J. W. 
Jansaon, K. H. 
.Ic'iison, E. A. 
Jensen, J. F. 
Jeppesen, Lars 
Jessen, Carl 
Jernberg, A. 

Kaholemoku, W. 
Ivaktin Ed. 
Kane, John 
Karliu, Veda 
Karlgren, Gust 
Karlslrand. Gust. 
Kennedy. J. R. 
Kick, Aug. 
Kinamon, Jack 
Kinghorn, Frank 
Kirrppin. Matti 
Kittelscn, Karl 

Lagerberg, Chas. 
l^ine, J. E. 

Lamberg, Herman Leslie, J. M. 

Lambert, S. I. Lewis, Wm! 
Landburg, Herman Liesen, Wm. 

I>;indregan, J. W. J>iiulKren, Einst. 

Langworthy, E. C. Lindgross, L. 11. 

Larsen, Fingl. Lofgren, R. 

Larsen, Kaare Loland, Louis 
Larsen, J. H. -22S0Lonnqvist, John 

Larsen, L. H. Loughrey, C. W. 

Larsen, K. -1560 Lund, Olai 

Larsen, Albln Lundberg, Oskar 

Larson, Herbert Lyngard, Geo. 

JlacGregor, Donald Mettson, Carl 



John.sen, Norinan 
Jolianson, A. -218.1 
Johansen, Johan A. 
Johansen, T. A. 
Johnsen, Walther 
Johansson, Nath. 
Johnson, Guniiar 
Johnston. Leslie 
Jonsson, Erik 
Jurgensen, Johannes 
Jorgensen, Ole E. 
Jorgensen. Jorgen 
Juell, R. 

Kiyanno, F. W. E. 
Knutsen, Karl 
Knudsen, Rangvald 
Koluin, Oscar 
Kooistra, S. 
Kristensen, A. -1095 
Krohn, Harry 
Knox, David 
Krumholts, W. 
Kullboin, Oscar 
Kuronen, Hemming 
Kustel, V. J. 

Laskey, C. H. 
Letter, John A. 



Mahler, Hans 
Mahoney, F. J. 
Maldonado, A. 
Marshall, L S. 
Martins, Jose 
Martin, John 
Mathis. H. 
Matheis, Herman 
McManus, P. 



Meza, Leonardo 
Mikkelsen, Olaf 
Miller, W. J. 
Miller, F. A. 
Miller, William 
Mittemeyer, Y. F. 
Moe. R. 
Monson, M. O. 
Moore, Thos. 



McGillivray, F. B. Moren, E. H. 
McNeil, D. R. Morisse, Henry 



Meek, O. J. 
Hellers, H. J. 
Mellers, James 



Morris, O. R. 
Morrison, Phillip 



Nielsen, Carl C. 

Nielsen, C. -1303 

Nielsen, H. J. 

Nielsen, P. L. 

Nielsen, Willy 

Nielsen, C. -1314 



Nagel, A. 

Nagle, Chris. 

.Veindorff, F. R. 

Nelsen, Rangrvald 

Nelson, Axel 

Nelson, Fred 

Nelson, Waldemar Nilsen, Edon 

Nelson, John, -1013 Nlllsen, Jens 

Nelson, A. W. Nilsson, S. H. H. 

Ness, Aksel Noonan, J. 

Neuman, -1423 Nordenberg, Alfred 

Nickolsen, L. Nordstrom, Bror 

Nicolaisen, S. Nunes, C. C. 

Nielsen, Villy Nyland, A. M. J. 

Oberg, M. W. -1044 Olson, E. A. 
Olafson, O. B. Olsson, Axel 

Ulsen, H. -1314 Olsson. C. O. 



I ilsin. Marinus 

Olsen, Oskar 

Olsen, Jens 

Olson, Albert 

Parson, Herman 

Pedersen, H'. P. 

PeUrseii, H. A. 

Pedersen, C. -1286 

Pedersen, Peter B. 

Pendlebury, Tom 

I'erdok. A. -1861 

Persson, Edw. 

Persson, O. W. 

IVrselli, Geo. 

I'elers, J. M. . 

Peterson, O. E. 

Peterson, .Jennings Pulver, W. F. 

Peterson, M. 



Urzediiuwsky, Leo 
Oseberg. Ansgar 
Osth, T. 
Owens, Wm. 

Petersen, O. -1595 
Peterson, L. -1389 
Petlibone, G. W. 
Pettersen. Ulgbert 
Pihlstrom, R. J. 
Pilkinton. Homer 
Pinkhurst, C. B. 
Porter, R. 
Post, Albert 
Preen, P. A. van 
Prinz, Carl 
Prun, John 



Rantanen, F. 
Rasmussen, E. V. 
Rasinussen, Emil 
Reigel, Willie 
Renrall, A. 
Richardson, J. W. 
Richardson, E. A. 
Ricklioff, W. 
Ridden, Allan 
Riesbeck, HJ. 
Ulni^dal Karl 
Ringdal, Ola 

Saalma, Joseph 
Sahlin, Nils 
riandblom, K. 
Sanne, R. 
Schlachte, Alf. 
Scott, B. F. 
Seiffert, John 
Shannon, J. 
Sigrist, Geo. 



Ringman, C. W. 
Roach, S. 
Robertson, Jorgen 
Rohman, Geo. 
Ronning, H. 
Rosa, John 
Ross, Geo. 
Rosan, V. 
Rundell, W. 
Rundstrom, Albert 
Rupp, Albert 
Ryan, Patrick 

Stange, A. -2063 
Steen, Ivar 
Stenssloff, E. 
Stevensen, Aug. 
Slinip.son, V. B. 
Strauss, W. 
Strasdin, H. 
Strandberg, Elof 
Stranberg, P. 



Simonsen, Slgvard Straiten, Harry 
SJolander, J. B. Strom. Fred 



Smedsvig, O. B. 
Smith, Jacob C. 
Smith, Johan 
Smith, T. J. 
Solberg, B. P. 
Solvin, Oscar E. 
Souza, Louis 
Sparling, James 

Taival, Alf. 
Tamlsar, P. 
Tainini, J. E. 
I'andberg, Einar 
Tellefsen, Emil 
'J'eiyersen, Tom 
Thom, Ed. 
Thomas, Frank 
Thorstensen, B. 



Sundberg, F. F. 
Sundburg, C. 
Svendsen, Geo. E. 
Svensen. Anker 
Swanson, Oscar 
Swanson, S. 
Sweeney, D. 

Thompsen. Jack 
Thompson, C. 
Tonning, Chris. 
Torjussen, J. I. -102S 
Tibbitts, P. 
Toffrl, A. 
Torrance, John 
Tuomlnen. Kaarlo 
Tyrrell, James 



Van Fleet, F. B. Victor, J. 
Van Keen, T. R. A. Vlhavalnen, Geo. 
Vander, Klift J. J. Von Mahren, B. 
Vaughan, A. S. Vizcaino, F. 

Venquirst, E. 

Wadkins, T. 

Wallenstrand 

Warjo, J. 

Walkin, E. H. 

Weelen, Theodorus Winkel, August 

Wehtje, W. H. Wiseman, C. 

VVeijola. Arturi Williams. Charley 

Weinberg, Kriss Woods, E. J. -714 

Westerlund, Albert Wrelljan, Joseph 

Wickstrom. Axel 



Wlckstrom, J. A. 
W^ikstrom, W. 
AVikman, D. 
Wilhelm, E. 



PACKAGES. 



Abbors, Arne 
Benson, Fred 
Kgan, John 
Flood, Alex. 
Goodmans, Q. 
Gunderson, Ole 
Highland, D. 
Hobbs, F. 
Ii-mey, Fred 
Jewett, Chaa. 



Johansen, S. R. 
Johaneson, K. 
Long, C. 
MacDonnell, W. 
Mayes, J. B. 
Monroe, A. J. 
Olsen, H. 
Olsen, Ole 
Olaon, Knut 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Charles L. Carlsen, No. 1834, who 
disappeared from the barge "Isaac 
Reed" at Eureka, California, on De- 
cember 31, 1918, is inquired for by 
his wife, Mrs. C. L. Carlsen, 107 
Courtland Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Kearny 6361 



The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 

Opposite Southern Pacific Bidg. 

60 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 
Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Walt, by the Latest Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
tVE USE ONLY THK BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 



CHRISTENSEN'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Established 1906 

CAPT. C. EHLERS, Superintendent 
257 Hansford Bldg 
268 Market Street 

The pupils of this well known school 
are taught all up-to-date requirements 
for passing a successful examination 
before the United States Steamboat 
Inspection Service. 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Kearny 5132 

East Street Tailors 

GENERAL OUTFITTER 

Altering done at moderate prices 

209 East Street, nr. Washington 

San Francisco 

H. LEVERIDGE 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 to 50 cents per day, 
Dr $2 to $3.00 per weeli, with all mod- 
ern conveniences. Free Hot and Cold 
Shower Baths on every floor. Elevator 
Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 



HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7758 

Res., Randolph 27 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 6:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Franclaco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goodf 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices. :: :: Union Made Goods Only. 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



LOOK 

For the Name and the Number 

GEO. A. PRICE 

19 East Street, San Francisco 



U. S. Navy Tower's 

Sea Boots Flannels Oil Skins 

SEAMEN— OUTFITTER— FISHERMEN 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 
Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoei 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand ard Baggage Room 

— at — 

212 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Reliable Tailor 

Up-to-date Cloths at Popular 
Prices. All work guaranteed. 

TOM WILLIAMS 

28 SACRAMENTO STREET 

Near Market 

Special Inducements to Seafaring Trade 

SUITS STEAM PRESSED, 50 Cts. 

The only way; no burninK of 
garments. 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 



716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 



UNION MADE 
IN OUR OWN SHOP 

Represented by 

E. PEGUILLAN 




SUITS AND 
OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 
Prices 




ARE YOUR LIBERTY BONDS SAFE 

Bring or send them for safekeeping to this Savings 
and Commercial Bank and open a 

LIBERTY BONDS SAVINGS ACCOUNT 
We will take care of your Liberty Bonds for you 
free of charge. Our folder 

"What Shall I Do With Them" pTeS\S^y;rc%^tSy. 

Anglo-California Trust Company Bank 

"THE PERSONAL SERVICE BANK" 

Market and Sansome Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

Sixteenth and Mission Streets Third and Twentieth Streets 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO SEAFARING MEN 



UTTMARK'S NAUTICAL ACADEMY 

(Established 1S82) 
CAPTAIN F. E. UTTMARK, Principal 



8 State Street 
New York, N. Y. 



30 India Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR MASTERS', MATES' AND 
PILOTS' EXAMINATION 

Our ACADEMY is recognized as the oldest and best equipped NAVIGATION 

SCHOOL in the United States and is up to date in every respect. For 

full information call at school or write. Catalog sent free on request. 

"UTTMARK'S FOR NAVIGATION" 




Named Shoes are frequently m»d* in 
Non-Union facton*!? 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of tbi» 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
Collis Lovely, Gen. Pres. Cbas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 







Ask for this Label 
on Beer 



INT'L UNION OF 
UNITED BREWERY and 
SOFT DRINK WORKERS 

OF AMERICA 
Asks you to write and speak to your 







Ask for this Label 
on Soft Drinks 



STATE ASSEMBLYMEN AND STATE SENATORS 

TO 

WORK AND VOTE 

Against the Ratification of the National Prohibition Amendment 
to the Constitution 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietor* 

Establiahed 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAW FWANCItCO 



News from Abroad 



The Hunan provincial government 
(Chinese) is operating the largest 
silver-lead mine in China, according 
to the United States Department of 
Commerce. 

A commercial contract has been 
enacted between Switzerland and 
Germany for the purpose of assur- 
ii:g to Switzerland a sufficient quan- 
tity of coal and fertilizer and to Ger- 
many a certain amount of food- 
stuffs. 

Japan's trade with China, reports 
the Herald of Asia, amounted to 
11,370,000 yen in exports and 8,276,- 
000 yen in imports. Compared with 
returns for the corresponding period 
last year both exports and imports 
represented an increase of 50 and 
170 per cent., respectively. 

Australia's present plans for tariff 
revision, with a differential in favor 
of the United Kingdom, will severe- 
ly restrict American trade with her, 
says Commerce and Finance. Im- 
port duties are slated for a general 
increase, both to raise more revenue 
rmd to prevent the influx of cheap 
Japanese goods. 

The Belgian Government has de- 
cided upon the electrification of all 
the raihvays in the kingdom, be- 
ginning with the Antwerp-Brtissels 
and Brussels-Luxemburg lines. When 
the first lines are completed it will 
be possible to go from Brussels to 
Antwerp in twenty-five minutes and 
(rains will run every fifteen minutes. 

The report of the Royal Packet 
Company, Amsterdam, for 1918, 
shows a total to credit of profit and 
loss of Fl. 18,895,084. The net profit, 
after writing Fl. 2,104,996 off the 
fleet, placing Fl. 10,472,878 to various 
reserves and writing Fl. 502,014 off 
the Indian properties, was Fl. 5,- 
752,726. A dividend of 17 p'er cent, 
is paid. 

The Petroleum Committee of the 
Mexican Senate has presented a 
report on legislation regulating 
Article XXVII. of the Constitution 
of 1917, which nationalizes oil lands, 
and at the same time laid before the 
Senate a draft of law eliminating 
all retroactive effects of the pro- 
posed oil legislation. This is a 
concession for which foreign oil 
interests have been contending. 

Despite the soaring prices of com- 
modities and consequent hardship of 
living in Japan, the Overseas Devel- 
opment Company (Kaigai Kogyo 
Kaisha) is encountering difficulties 
in the fulfillment of its agreement 
with the Brazilian Government for 
the supply of 20,000 Japanese emi- 
grants because of the reluctance of 
the Japanese in rural districts to 
leave the country. A canvass of 
Japan to secure the remaining num- 
ber, which must be sent within two 
years, has not been satisfactory. 

Under the new German constitu- 
tion no state can ha\'e more than 
two-fiftlis of the total number of 
votes in the Council. Half of Prus- 
sia's votes must come from provin- 
cial administrations. Tlie President 
will be chosen by tiie entire German 
people instead of by the Assembly, 
and will hold office for a term of 
seven years. A system of councils 
is created for industries, by which 
employes will have a voice in the 
decisions reached by the employers. 
The second main part provides that 
all Germans shall be equal before the 
law and that men and women shall 
have basically the same rights and 
duties. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the WiU 



Johnson— They tell me that Dobbs 
is an awful grumbler. Jackson — He 
is. He is the kind of fellow who 
hhuiies his face because it needs a 
shu\e. — T-ondon Blighty. 



Hewitt— My wife is a cheerful sort 
of companion. Jewett — How is that.'' 
Hewitt— I told her that I had taken 
out a twenty-year endowment on my 
life, and she said that she hoped I 
wouldn't mature before the policy 
did.— Life. 



Mrs. Xewbride— When you found 
that you couldn't accept the invita- 
U6n to our wedding why didn't you 
send your regrets? Miss Ryval— 
Oh, I thought you'd have enough of 
your own pretty soon, dear. — Kansas 
City Star. 



"How much is your new country 
house going to cost?" "Much more 
than 1 expected," answered Mr. 
Crosslots. "We forgot to figure in 
the mural decorations and private 
elevator for the servant's room." — 
Xcw- 'S'ork Globe. 



"Well, well," said the pompous 
doctor, "and how has our little one 
been in the interim?" "Oh," replied 
the an.xious mother, "she hasn't com- 
plained of that at all; it's her stom- 
ach that seems to pain her today." — 
New York Evening Post. 



The young son of a California uni- 
versity professor had been playing 
soldier and had for the dozenth 
time demolished the Hun army. At 
a table nearby the professor was 
busy with some calculations. Sud- 
denly, glancing up, Jimmy spied 
something. "Father," he cried, 
there's a big black spider on the 
ceiling." "Step on it, son, and don't 
bother me. I'm busy," said the pro- 
fessor aljseiit-mindedly. 



Hishop Lawrence of Massachusetts 
is said never to be at a loss for a 
telling reply. A friend tells of the 
occasion when the bishop, as guest 
at a country home, indulged in lob- 
ster and mince pie, not wisely, but 
too well. When he began to feel 
more himself again his hostess ven- 
tured to kid him a little, saying: 
"Why, bishop, you surely were not 
afraid to die!" "No, madam," he 
answered solemnly, "but I would 
have been ashamed to." 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 



1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Children's Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 
save. Opon an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them bjT example 
that you believe in a savings account. 

They cannot start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS Ol-fJ AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal .supervi.slon 
of CAJ^rAIN H15NKY TAYLOR and e<iulpped 
witli all modern appliances to Illustrate and 
leaih any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navieatiou In the 
past have been those liaving simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and tlie 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Liaw, and Is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering ttie School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments ol 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the heiglit of liie average well-informed man, and in a 
comparatively short Interval ol time. 




HORACE R. TAYLOR 



HENRY TAYLOR 



TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

510 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

IMPORTERS OF NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 
LORD KELVIN'S and WHYTE THOMSON'S 
Compasses, Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sound- 
ing JVIachines, Sextants, Parallel Rulers, Pelorus Di- 
viders and Nautical Books of Every description. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 
1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 



J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRV HEINZ 



When Vou Buy 
from U«, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash. 



Diamonds 
Watches 



Phon* Dougla* >7nt 



ARTHUP HEINZ 
Orlcrinal Slae 




SOLID GOLD S1.50 
aOLO FILLED .50 



64 MARKET STREET 



High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

SEAMEN" When in Port- BE SURE 

You see the most complete line of 

UNION LABEL SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS IN THE U. S. A. 

Sold Direct to You at Manufacturer's Prices 



EAGLESON a CO. 



1118 Market St. 
San Francisco 
717 K St., near Postoffice 

Sacramento 
112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 



Diamonds. Watches, Jewelry, Silverware 

715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 




Qames Ji. Sorensert 



Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 



Big Stock— Everything Marked in Plain Figures 

THK OXK-PRICF. IKWELRY STORE 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 

At the Big Red Clock and the Chimes. 




Market at Fifth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

678 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend, San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Kearny 519 



SKAMEN! 
You Know Ma 




I am 
'•YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prkes. I'll try and 
wait on you per-sonilly and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STKTSON hats too. 

If you want your Panama blocked 

right. Ill do that. 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to tnean Market. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CI6AR 

UNION MADE 

BCD SEAL CKAI CO.. nANUrAaUROS 

133 FIRST STREET. S. F. 
Phone Dougia* 1M0 



CJBfTBDSr'EH 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE 

JRGOWStffi 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
OEBcial Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXIII, No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1919. 



Whole No. 25.57. 



WORLD'S SHIPPING STATISTICS 



Pre -War and Post -War Figures Compiled and Issued by Lloyd's 



The new (1919-20) edition of Lloyd's 
Register of Shipping, which has just been 
issued, is the first one since the beginning 
of the world war which has been produced 
entirely without interference from the cen- 
sors. The main body of the Register, 
which contains particulars of all seagoing 
vessels of 100 tons and upwards, has been 
carefully revised and brought up-to-date, 
and the complete elimination of all "camou- 
flage" as regards losses which was rend- 
ered necesskry by war conditions enables 
all to again place full confidence in the 
Register as the most reliable authority on 
merchant shipping published. 

The work, which is summarized herewith, 
contains once more, in all their complete- 
ness, the several auxiliary sections, in- 
cluding, in addition to a directory of ship- 
owners and managers, with lists of their 
respective fleets, particulars of vessels fit- 
ted with refrigerating appliances, vessels 
fitted for carrying petroleum in bulk, cable 
steamers, motor vessels, and those fitted 
for burning oil fuel; detailed information 
upon such matters as docks, tidal harbors, 
etc., etc., in all parts of the world. 



The section in the Register which is doubtless 
of greatest public interest is the one giving the 
new statistical tables. These provide not only 
particulars of the tonnage now owned in each 
country of the world, but also the necessary in- 
formation for comparison with similar figures 
issued in 1914 and thus allow of a fairly accu- 
rate estimate of the effect of the war on mer- 
chant shipping as regards both individual coun- 
tries and the world's total tonnage. 

The contents of the several tables repay a 
careful study, but the one of most immediate 
interest and importance is that which sets forth 
the tonnage owned by different countries. 
The figures contained in the corresponding table 
which was issued with Lloyd's Register Book 
in July, 1914, showed that at that time there 
were about 45,404,000 tons gross of steamers 
and 3.686,000 tons net (approximately equal to 
4,050,000 tons gross) of sailing vessels. The 
present figures are: Steam tonnage, 47,897,000 
tons and sailing tonnage, 3,022,000 tons. It will 
thus be seen that the tonnage of steamers has 
increased by nearly 2^ million tons, while the 
sail tonnage has decreased by about 1,030,000 
tons gross. No doubt the war has, to a certain 
extent, affected the amount of sailing tonnage, 
but in view of the fact that during the previous 
quinquennial period, 1909-1914. the decrease of 
sail tonnage was actually 380,000 tons more 
than the decrease recorded during the last five 
years, and taking into account the small pro- 



portion of the carrying capacity of the world's 
tonnage now represented by sailing vessels, it 
will be well to confine attention to the effects 
of the war on the steam tonnage of the world. 

The following table shows the steam tonnage 
owned by the principal maritime countries be- 
fore and after the war: — 
June, 1914 

Country. Tons gross. 

United Kingdom . . 18,892,000 
British Dominions. 1,632,000 
United States: — 

Seagoing 2,027,000 

Great Lakes 2,260,000 

Austria-Hungary . 1,052,000 

Denmark 770,000 

France 1 ,922,000 

Germany 5,135,000 

Greece 821,000 

Holland 1,472,000 

Italy 1,430,000 

Japan 1,708,000 

Norway 1,957,000 

Spain 884,000 

Sweden 1,015,000 

Other Countries... 2,427,000 



June, 1919. 


Percent- 


Tons gross. 


age.* 


16,345,000 


—13.5 


1,863,000 


-1-14.1 


9,773,000 


+ 382.1 


2,160,000 


-^A 


713,000 


—32.2 


631,000 


—18.1 


1,962,000 


+2.1 


3,247,000 


—36.8 


291,000 


—64.6 


1,574,000 


+6.9 


1,238,000 


—13.4 


2,325,000 


+36.1 


1,597,000 


—18.4 


709,000 


—19.8 


917,000 


—9.7 


2,552,000 


+ 5.2 



Grand total. . .45,404,000 47,897,000 +5.5 



Total Abroad 26,512,000 31,552,000 +19.0 



*Difference between 1914 and 1919. 

It will be seen that the seagoing tonnage of 
the United States has increased by about 7)4 
million tons, equal to more than 382 per cent, as 
compared with the 1914 totals. Japan has added 
617,000 tons to her merchant tonnage, equal to 
over 36 per cent., and the British Dominions 
have added 231,000 tons, or over 14 per cent, 
inore. 

On the other hand, the countries where the 
greatest decrease has taken place are: United 
Kingdom, showing a loss of more than 2i.4 
million tons, Greece 530,000 tons, Norway 360,- 
nOO tons, Italy 192,000 tons, Spain 175,000 tons, 
and Denmark 139,000 tons. 

As stated in the Statistical Tables, enemy 
vessels which at the date of the Armistice had 
not been captured or requisitioned by other 
countries are included in the 1919 figures as 
German and ex-Austro-Hungarian. The tonnage 
of enemy vessels taken over by the Allies since 
the Armistice amounts to over l->4 million tons. 

The figures given in the Statistical Tables for 
Germany are not, therefore, final figures. They 
indicate a loss of 1,888,000 tons of the date 
of the Armistice as compared with 1914, but 
that figure will be considerably increased. 

United Kingdom and United States. 

One of the most striking results of the com- 
parison of the 1919 and 1914 figures is the 
relative position of the United Kingdom and 
the United States. In 1914, 41.6 per cent, of 
the world's tonnage was owned in the United 
Kingdom, and 4.46 per cent, was composed of 
seagoing tonnage of the United States; the 
present figures are: United Kingdom 34.1 per 



cent.. United States 24.9 per cent., including 
20.4 per cent, of the seagoing tonnage. 

As regards material, there is no doubt that 
for several reasons wood tonnage can be 
largely excluded from consideration. The 
American seagoing tonnage would then be re- 
duced to 8,426,000 as against 16,267,000 tons for 
the United Kingdom. 

As regards the size of vessels it is a generally 
accepted fact that for ocean voyages large ves- 
sels are more efficient and economical than 
smaller vessels. Vessels of less than 2,000 tons 
are usually employed in the home trade or for 
short sea voyages in the foreign trade. 

For this purpose, the geographical position of 
the United Kingdom is more favorable than the 
position of the United States, as a larger num- 
ber of smaller vessels can be employed in the 
foreign trade of the United Kingdom than is 
possible in th?t of the United 'States. 

In this connection, the figures are not without 
interest: 

Seagoing Vessels of 2,000 Tons Gross and Over 

Owned in the United Kingdom and 

United States. 

United United 

Tons. Kingdom. States. 

2,000 and under 4,000 1042 1272 

4,000 and under 8,000 1,485 'sil 

8,000 and above 263 90 

Norway has lost the largest amount — 360,000 
tons; Denmark, 139,000 tons; and Sweden, 98,000 
tons. Of the other principal neutral countries, 
Spain has lost 175,000 tons, while the present 
figures for Holland show an increase of 102,000 
tons. 

The combined net gain of France, Italy and 
Japan amounts to 465,000 tons, and the losses 
incurred by the German and ex-Austro-Hunga- 
rian merchant navies at the time of the Armis- 
tice were already about 2,250,000 tons. 

The question has often been asked, what 
would the tonnage be now if there had been 
no war? This has more academic than practical 
interest, but, nevertheless, several attempts have 
l)een made to provide an answer. It is, oi 
course, _ very difficult to arrive at a definite 
conclusion in the case of the several countries, 
as so many factors have to be taken into ac- 
count. A careful estimate has, however, been 
made u])on tlie following assumptions: — 

(1) It is reasonable to expect that the per- 
centage of addition to the world's tonnage 
would have continued at the ratio (a de- 
creasing one) recorded during the last IS pre- 
war years, and that the percentage of the 
United Kingdom's tonnage to the world's 
tonnage would show approximately the same 
ratio of decrease recorded during the most 
recent of these years. 

(2) Countries in which there has been a 
large addition of tonnage during the previous 
quinquennial period might be expected to 
show a reduction in the ratio of increase, 
and, generally speaking, the larger the pre- 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



vious increase the larger would be such re- 
duction. 

(3) Allowances should be made in the spe- 
cial cases of countries where pre-war condi- 
tions pointed to the acquisition of tonnage, 
in the near future, at a higher ratio than 
what had actually been recorded during the 
previous period. 

The e.stimate made for the principal maritime 
countries is as follows: 

Tons. 

United Kingdom 21,348,000 

British Dominions 2,062,000 

23,410,000 

United States (Sea).: 2,605,000 

United States (Lakes) 2,599,000 

5,204,000 

France 2,498,000 

Germany 6,829,000 

Holland 1,958,000 

Italy 1,915,000 

.Japan 2,305,000 

Norway 2,622,000 

Other Countries 8,629,000 

Grand Total 55,370,000 

Total Abroad 34,022,000 

Effect of the War on Shipping. 
It will be seen that the net result of the war 
on the world's merchant steam tonnage would 
appear to be as follows: 

Tons. 

Loss of British tonnage 5,202,000 

Loss of tonnage other than British 

(except U. S.) 9,000,000 

14,202,000 
Net gain to U. S. tonnage 6,729,000 

Net world's loss 7,473,000 

Comparing individual countries it is seen that 
by far the largest loss has been incurred by the 
United Kingdom, the tonnage of which is 
probably now over 5,000,000 tons less than it 
would have been but for the war. Excluding 
enemy countries the greatest sufferers after the 
United Kingdom are Norway to the extent of 
over 1,000,000 tons, Italy 667,000 tons, and 
France 536,000 tons. The German loss is, as 
already explained, less than the final figures 
will show when they are available. 

The only country which has increased her 
merchant fleet owing to the war is the United 
States, which, upon the above basis, has now 
over 7.000.000 tons of seagoing tonnage more 
than she would have had if war had not taken 
place. 

The increase in the case of Japan is but 
slightly higher than w-ould have occurred under 
ordinary conditions. 

The question of efficiency of the present 
steam tonnage has not been taken into account 
in the above figures. Quite apart from additions 
to the merchant fleets of the world, before the 
war, replacements of steam tonnage lost, broken 
up, etc., amounted each year to about 1^ per 
cent, of the total tonnage owned, while during 
the war to replace the tonnage lost involved the 
construction of new tonnage equal to 33 per 
cent, of the steam tonnage owned in 1914. Owing 
to these reasons there is no doubt that a large 
amount of tonnage is now in existence, which 
under ordinary conditions would have been 
broken up and replaced by more modern and 
more economical vessels. 

These remarks apply to the United Kingdom 
to a much greater extent than to other coun- 
tries. During the three pre-war years 1911-1912- 
1913, close on tw'o million tons of steamers 
were sold foreign, and of course replaced by 
better vessels, while during the three years 
1916-1917-1918 probably less than 100,000 tons 
of steamers were sold in this way. 

Moreover, it should be remembered that a 
large proportion of the tonnage built during 
the war is not equal in general efficiency to the 
tonnage which was built in the last few years 
prior to the war. 

Taking these considerations into account, it 
may reasonably be assumed that the world has 
lost through the war no less than 8^ million 
tons gross of shipping, which represents a 
deadweight carrying capacity of about 12J/2 
million tons. 

The 'World's Tonnage. 

The Register is provided with statistical tables 
in its appendix, and the first of these shows 
the merchant tonnage owned in each country 
of the world. Small vessels, i. e., steamers of 
less than 100 tons gross, and sailing vessels of 
less than 100 tons net, are excluded. The 
steamers of this tonnage recorded in the new 
edition of Lloyd's Register Book amount to 
24 386, with a total gross tonnage of 47,897,407 
tons; the sailing vessels are 4,869. of 3,021,866 
tons: steam and sail combined, 29,255 vessels 
of 50,919.273 tons gross. 

The second table is entirely new, and points 
to the demand of each country for certain 
sizes of vessels. In conjunction with Tables 
No. 5 and No. 7, which show the suj^ply o' 



such vessels from each shipbuilding country, it 
will be possible in future editions to estimate 
tlie relative maritime position of each country, 
not only as regards the total tonnage owned, 
but also in respect to the possession of different 
sizes of ships. Tiie table divides the steamers 
owned in the world according to certain di- 
visions of gross tonnage. It will be seen that 
the total number of steamers now in existence 
of 5,000 gross tons and over is not less than 
2,914, 238 of which are of 10,000 tons and above. 
The United Kingdom's share of the large vessels 
is 1,140, including 119 of 10,000 tons and above. 
The other countries which have more than 100 
vessels of 5,000 tons and above are: The United 
States, 918 (188 of which are for trade on the 
Great Lakes): Germany, 219; Japan, 117, and 
France, 109. The steamers of less than 1,000 
tons gross amount to 12,521, i. e., over 50 per 
cent, of the total number of steamers of 100 
tons and upwards recorded in Lloyd's Register 
Book. 

The third table shows the number of tonnage 
of all vessels now in existence, which are 
were formerly classed with Lloyd's Register. 
Nearly 22.000,000 tons of shipping is now 
actually classed by the Society, and the 
existing vessels which were formerly classed 
total over 5,600,000 tons. These figures show 
the general appreciation of the value of the 
classification of Lloyd's Register, and that such 
recognition is world-wide is proved by the fact 
that the tonnage of vessels owned abroad and 
now classed by the Society is about 10-54 million 
tons. Of the total tonnage classed over 90 
per cent, is composed of steel steamers classed 
100 A. 

The eighth table shows the number and gross 
tonnage of new vessels classed by Lloyd's 
Register during the calendar year 1918. The 
tonnage of these vessels amounted to the 
enormous total of 3,467,537 tons, and of this 
over I'/z million tons were built in the United 
States. 



NO SLAVE LABOR! 



Do we want slave labor in California? 
.\pparently a great many of us do. At 
least there is a propaganda sent out by 
some organization calling itself the West- 
ern States Development Committee, in San 
Francisco, for presenting to Congress a 
memorial "requesting enactment authoriz- 
ing admission into the United States of a 
limited number of Chinese or other Asiatic 
laborers, with the understanding that they 
are to be employed in menial tasks and 
rough work incidental to agricultural pur- 
suits and other food production." And 
even Y. S. McClatchy of Sacramento, as a 
part of a constructive program regarding 
Japanese immigration, proposes that in 
place of the excluded Japanese we arrange 
to import a definite number of Chinese who 
are to be confined to certain classes of 
work and are to be exported when the need 
of them for that particular work is ended. 

All of these proposals involve the estab- 
lishment, in California, of a class of labor- 
ers not free. These Chinese, if imported, 
would not be permitted to choose their 
own employment, to leave their jobs if 
dissatisfied, to move at will, or to improve 
their condition by engaging in other occu- 
])ations. Also, they would not be permit- 
ted to acquire a permanent residence and 
would be exported upon the termination 
of their term of service. Men who lack 
these rights are not free men and the de- 
mand for laborers of this sort is a demand 
for unfree laborers whose very lack of 
freedom would be the qualification recom- 
mending them to their employers. 

Such a system of servitude may not 
strictly be properly slavery, since the la- 
borers are not owned. It is a system al- 
ready fully organized in the Orient, and is 
there known as "indentured labor." Under 
it the laborer is an unfree person for a 
term of years, but has certain rights of 
repatriation and compensation at the ex- 
piration of that term. In the meantime he 
is a slave under limited tenure. China 



has laws ^regulating the export of coolies 
under this system. Californians who desire 
the importation of such laborers would 
probably be shocked at the conditions im- 
posed. The Chinese coolie slave would 
have to be granted by them some rights 
beyond even those which they have been 
willing to grant to free American laborers. 
The entire cost of transporting the coolies 
from China to California and back again 
would have to be deposited in advance, in 
cash. A good bond covering the entire 
amount of wages of all the laborers for a 
term of years would have to be deposited. 
Laborers would have to be guaranteed 
wages for twelve months every year, 
whether employed or not. Hospitals and 
doctors would have to be provided to care 
for them free of charge, at the expense of 
the employers, when sick, regardless of 
the duration of that sickness. L^nless these 
conditions are met, China will not permit 
the exportation of indentured coolies. It 
is doubtful if American employers would 
be willing to meet them for the benefit of 
this class of labor. It is certain that even 
if they were met the laborers would con- 
stitute a class of semi-slaves, and that those 
who advocate their importation do so for 
this reason. They regard freedom as a 
disadvantage and slavery as an advantage 
in a laborer, and the very qualification 
which they desire in these Chinese would 
be precisely this status of temporary 
slavery. 

It is probably not necessary to argue 
against the institution of slavery. The 
majority of our people do not believe in 
it, and we are not likely to get it. But 
when the proposal comes in this disguised 
form, it is at least worth while to picture 
to ourselves clearly exactly what it means 
and to realize that there is an actual and 
very earnest movement on the part of a 
minority of people in California to estab- 
lish a system of slave labor, because its 
proponents really believe that slave labor is 
better than free labor. — Fresno Republican. 



FLOWERS IN GREENLAND. 



The Arctic region is constantly attracting 
attention. In a recent address, Donald B. 
MacMillan. explorer, said that there are 
more than 700 kinds of flowers in Green- 
land, and that when the sun comes back in 
the spring the air fairly vibrates with the 
whirring of the wings of birds. Aero- 
planes, it is hinted, may soon be speeding 
over wide polar areas and revealing facts 
now unknown. The airmen will have an 
advantage over the ordinary explorer in 
their attempts to reach an objective point, 
as will i)robably be admitted by Storker 
Storkerson and four companions, who set 
out from an Arctic coast on an ice-pack, 
with the hope that it would carry them 
west to islands north of Siberia, and, after 
drifting nine months, landed, not long ago, 
about seventy-five miles from where they 
started. 



The world's supply of silver is estimated 
at 2.=i0,000,000 ounces annually. There is 
produced on the North Ainerican continent 
175,000,000 ounces each year, of which the 
United States produces 75,000,000 ounces, 
Mexico the same amount, while Canada 
furnishes 25,000,000. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Commercial Trusts Are Modern Empires. 

A new form of business trust, more 
dangerous to public welfare than those 
which brought about the enactment of an- 
ti-monopoly and anti-trust laws, is devel- 
oping in the United States and must be 
curbed by Congress at once, according to 
testimony given to the House Judiciary 
Committee by William B. Colver, member 
of the Federal Trade Commission. 

The meat packing industry is the "classic 
illustration" of the new combination, Mr. 
Colver said, the principle of its growth be- 
ing that those in the combine seek not 
merely to control their main products and 
stifle competition, but also to control all 
by-products of their main manufacture. 

The old Standard Oil monopoly is a 
"two-cylinder trust," and the new devel- 
opment a "1920 model trust," was the com- 
parison given by Mr. Colver. He strongly 
recommended the addition of an amend- 
ment to both the Clayton anti-trust law 
and the Federal Trade Commission act, as 
a means of checking the growth of the 
modern type of commercial empire. 

"Compared to the new principle em- 
ployed, the old Standard Oil trust was not 
at all efifective, but would become so if it 
were to use the new method." 



Girls Join Union; Jailed at Midnight. 

A number of young girls, newly organ- 
ized members of the Optical Workers' 
Union, of Chicago, 111., were the victims 
of the most flagrant violation of the rights 
of citizens and union members. It would 
seem well-nigh impossible that in this 
twentieth century and in Chicago, a city 
somewhat alive to labor interests, there 
could occur such daring defiance of law, 
to say nothing. of human rights, as has been 
shown by the Optical Manufacturers' As- 
sociation in the attempt to destroy a union 
of their employees. The vice-president of 
one of the largest optical firms has taken 
upon himself all the authority of the chief 
of police in the handling of the striking op- 
tical workers, says the Unionist. Officers 
of the law were told to make arrests of 
girl strikers and were instructed to seize 
them after they had retired for the night. 
Girls were charged with intimidation, 
though their only offense was that of 
joining a union. Three girls who belonged 
to the union were the victims of this utter 
disregard of law and order. They were 
jerked out of bed at midnight and were 
dealt with by the police as though they 
were the most desperate criminals. This 
was done at the instigation of a represen- 
tative of the Optical Manufacturers' Asso- 
ciation, who directed the police in making 
the arrests. 



Low Salaried Men and Clerks Seek Charity. 

New York office men, bank clerks, public 
employees — men of family who are forced 
to keep up comparatively high standards 
of appearance through associations — arc 
becoming objects of charity. 

While the garbage men get $10 a day, 
street car employees from $40 to $50 a 
week, and other semi-skilled workers gar- 
ner unprecedented return for their labor, 



the small salaried pen-and-ink toiler is 
turning his children over to the New York 
Department of Charities because of in- 
ability to keep pace with living costs. 

ISird S. Coler, commissioner of charities, 
has shown by facts and figures that prove 
that unless some assistance is given to the 
small salaried citizen, either in lower living 
costs, or higher returns, that the New York 
charities would be swamped with demands 
from a class of applicants never before' 
seen inside the doors of the department. 

"The subject of pity these days is not 
the down-and-outer, who is forced to ask 
charity because of drink or like troubles," 
said Coler. "It is the respectable family 
man working in our offices, in bank depart- 
ments, the clerks in big businesses. A^'e 
can cite a large number of cases where 
these men, who must keep up appearances 
in their work, are being gradually forced 
to the humiliation of public charity. 

"It sounds incredible that a man earn- 
ing $1,400 annually should be forced to 
give up one of his children. But that is 
the case. Rents, food costs, prices of 
everything made it a positive necessity in 
this case to put that child in an institution. 

"There are very few cases on our rec- 
ords for appeals for assistance from skilled 
manual workers. These trades have made 
their demands felt and are receiving com- 
mensurate wages. It is the clerk and of- 
fice man who give us our problem. 

"The issue has reached the point where 
I cannot understand why some of these 
underpaid employees do not join the man- 
ual trades." 



Struck to Enforce Award. 

Two hundred electricians of Toronto, On- 
tario, struck to enforce the majority report 
of the Board of Conciliation appointed by 
the Minister of Labor to investigate the 
dispute between the Toronto Electric Light 
Company, Toronto Railway Company and 
the electrical workers, resulting in a com- 
plete tie-up of the street car service. 

After a strike of 4j< hours the company 
agreed to put into force the award of the 
ISoard of Conciliation, the men to receive 
under its provisions an increase of 16 cents 
an hour, efifective as from July 1. 



Want Increase, Not Bonus. 

A\'hcn the information Avas conveyed to 
the convention of the National Federation 
of Postal Employees, in session in Wash- 
ington, D. C, that the House had passed 
a bill granting the postal workers a bonus 
of $LSO instead of acting favorably on the 
petition they presented demanding an in- 
crease of $500 a year, indignation was free- 
ly expressed. A delegation was appointed 
and instructed to go to the Capitol and pro- 
test against the action of the House and 
insist on a hearing before the Post Office 
Committee. 

The convention had previously favored 
a flat 50 per cent, increase in salaries for 
postal employees with time and a half for 
overtime, a 44-hour week and 30 days' 
leave. As a result of the action of the 
House threats were freely made by the 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia, 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston BIdg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 



st 2. 



GERMANY. 



Internationale Transportarbeiter - Federation, 
Engelufer, 18, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev Wedels 
plads 5, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-.Sjomens-och Eldareforbundt, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten IB., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Ccntrale Bond van Transportarbeiders, Hoofd- 
l>estuur, 's Gravendykwal ll'l te Rotterdam. 

Vakgroep Zeelieden, Pelikaanstraat 25, Rotter- 
dam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Geneva, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
tcira 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men'), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo des Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, NataL 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World*8 Worker. 



There is a great agitation in France 
at this moment among professors and 
teachers. The Chamber of Deputies 
has been called upon to discuss in- 
creases in salaries of all professors 
and teachers, which have not been 
changed since about 1853. 

Dissatisfied with their conditions 
of work and employment, the dock 
workers of Montevideo have gone 
on strike, tying up this South 
American port completely. The 
bosses attempted to' bring in strike 
breakers. Efforts of the strikers 
to prevent these from taking their 
places resulted in riots which the 
police were called to put down. 

For seven weeks the principal 
Rome (Italy) newspapers failed to 
appear, owing to the still unsettled 
printers' strike. The general public 
is now left without any information 
on the party lists in constituencies, 
except by reading the lists in the 
"Avanti," the Socialist Republican 
organ of the constituents where the 
Socialists have now decided to 
vote a Maximalist programme. 

The Federation of Labor Unions 
at Mexico City has issued a mani 
festo asking President Carranza to 
form a representative cabinet and 
immediately adjust the difificulties 
with the United States. The Mex 
can Herald editorially says the 
Mexican Government is showing a 
disposition to change its policy, and 
urges the Government to listen to 
public opinion, which is not in favor 
of war. 

Kyotaro Arai, a worker employed 
in the Hamamatsu-cho factory of the 
Imperial Government Railways in 
Japan, supported by Marquis Okuma, 
Mayor of Tokyo, Baron Shibusawa, 
the Home Minister, and the speaker 
of the lower house, has organized an 
association called the Labor League 
of Japan with the purpose of doing 
away with the strike as a method of 
settling disputes and solving prob 
lems between employer and em 
ployed. 

The Hoehi, one of the leading 
papers in Japan, has published an 
interesting article on the effect which 
the adoption of the principles of the 
International Labor Convention would 
have upon the spinning industries of 
Japan. It states that there were in 
May of this year 42 spinning mills 
employing 29,000 males and 96,000 
females, 5000 of the total, mostly 
girls, being under 14 years of age. 
The proposed enforcement of an 8- 
hour day would lessen the output 
by 40 per cent., the cessation of 
night work by IS per cent., and of 
Sunday labor by 16 per cent. 

The families of the postmen in 
Calcutta, India, have been starving 
on five dollars a month. They de 
manded a monthly increment of $1.50 
As nobody took any notice of it 
on strike did they go. The result 
was that one man was sentenced 
by the British to twenty days' rigor 
ous imprisonment for being the 
treasurer of the strike fund; five 
others were condemned to three 
weeks' rigorous imprisonment for 
being the leaders, eight others were 
lined, others were sacked. M 
Grundy informed the Secretary of 
State for India in the House of 
Commons, that English soldiers in 
India who were formerly trade union- 
ists in England, were called upon 
to take the place of postofTice ser 
vants on strike in India. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

5291/2 BEACON STREET, SAN PEDRO. CAL. 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In 
the sunny south, Is the Ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Nav- 
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will be thoroughly prepared to pass successfully before the United States 
steamboat Inspectors, 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



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made to order by expert tailors and designers. Best selection 
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Also ready-made Suits, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Trunks, Suit- 
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Bedding, Blankets and Toilet Articles. 

Slopchest Outfits, Wholesale. 



Free Information 
of the movements 
of all vessels under 
every flag. 



Free use of read- 
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rest room on the 
mezzanine floor. 



Macarthur's 

NAVIGATION LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES 

CAPT. CUGLE'S BOOK, SIMPLE RULES IN NAVI- 
GATION. THE BLUE BOOK OF FACTS, A HAND- 
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Nautical Instruments 

CAPTAINS' LEATHER CARRYING-CASES FOR SHIP'S 
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PARTS OF THE GLOBE. 

Twelve years ago the smallest, to-day the largest, best 

equipped and cleanest exclusive seafaring men's 

store in the world. 

A visit to this store will convince you. 

CAPTAIN CHAS. J. SWANSON 

36 Steuart Street, near Market 

In the Southern Pacific Building 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Douglas 1082 



S. G. SWANSON 

R.st.ibllshoil 1904 
For the BEST there Is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE — S. ij. Swanson is not connected 
with an.v dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
Za Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6t>i St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Gal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



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— Try — 

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A. R. ABRAHAM8EN. Prop. 



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BENJAMIN'S 

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AND OIL CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 




DO YOU KNOW 

That War-Savings Stamps 
pay 4 per cent, compound in- 
terest? 

That W. S. S. cost $4.12 in 
January and one cent more 
each succeeding month of the 
year, reaching their highest 
price, $4.23, in December? 

That the 1919 W. S. S., 
known as the Franklin Issue, 
will be redeemed by the Gov- 
ernment on January 1, 1924, 
for five dollars? 

That the 1918 W. S. S. will 
be redeemed by the Govern- 
ment on January 1, 1923, for 
five dollars? 

That W. S. S. of either issue, 
if necessary, may be redeemed 
for value to date, as indicated 
on the W. S. S. Certificate, at 
any post office upon ten days' 
notice? 

That one thousand dollars' 
worth of W. S. S. is the maxi- 
mum amount allowed to any 
one purchaser? 

That Thrift Stamps cost 
twenty-five cents? And that 
sixteen Thrift Stamps are ex- 
changeable for an interest-bear- 
ing War-Savings Stamp? 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the whereabouts 
I of L. C. S. Adniiiaal, a member of 
I the Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Asso- 
ciation, last heard of in Rotterdam, 
Holland, 1914, will please notify his 
brother J. J. Admiraal, 51 South 
Street, New York, N. Y. 8-13-19 



Information wanted regarding John 
Johnsen, native of Bergen, age 44, 
last heard from in New Orleans, 
1917, was then on schooner "Lizzie 
M. Parson," going to France, .^ny 
information will be appreciated by 
his brother, Andrew Johnsen, Sail- 
ors' Union. Seattle, Wa.sh. 8-20-19 



Will Ingwald Johnson, Charles 
Moller, and any other member of 
the crew of the S. S. "Chehalis," on 
January 29, 1919, when Otto Peter- 
son was injured, kindly report to the 
Secretary. Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, San Francisco, Cal. 8-13-19 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



A hatchery will be operated at Juneau, Alaska, 
by the Territorial Fish Commission, and other 
fish-cultural work will be taken up in due time. 

The Albina Engineer & Machine Works, of 
Portland, Ore., which played a big part in the 
shipbuilding program during the war, will be 
disorganized and the plant dismantled, according 
to announcements made by William Cornfoot, 
president and manager of the firm. Lack of 
contracts made the action necessary. 

Seattle officials of the South American Pacific 
line announced that the 2000-ton steamer "Rex" 
will come to this Coast for the first time next 
November to be installed on the regular routes 
between San Francisco, Puget Sound and the 
West Coast of South America. The "Rex" has 
been operating between England and Norway 
during the war and previous to that time she 
carried ice between Norway and France. 

Captain J. C. Smith, who has just returned 
from the Atlantic after commanding the wooden 
steamship "Fort Leavenworth" during the pas- 
sage from San Francisco to New York, is' a 
booster for the wooden steamer. He said that 
the "Leavenworth" encountered some of the 
worst weather on record after leaving Cristobal, 
but not a drop of water entered the holds. 
This vessel was cared for at the Tibbetts plant 
before receiving cargo. 

Launching dates for the two 7S00-ton concrete 
oil tankers under construction at San Diego 
were announced during the week by officials of 
the Pacific Marine and Construction Company. 
The "Cuyamaca" will slide into the bay No- 
vember 1 and the "San Pasqual" a month later. 
Boilers, engines and fittings for the two vessels 
have arrived and are awaiting installation. The 
United States Shipping Board, it is reported, 
will use the "Cuyamaca" and "San Pasqual" in 
the Philippine Island vegetable oil carrying trade. 

The Tibbetts Shipbuilding Company at Ala- 
meda has contracted to restore and recondition 
the steamer "Unimak," which was rammed by 
the "Helen P. Drew" a few miles north of the 
■harbor entrance the same morning that the 
United States Fleet arrived at San Francisco. 
Captain T. P. H, Whitelaw made a good job of 
righting the vessel, and after plugging up the 
hole on the starboard side, pumped the hull dry 
and the craft was floated. With the exception 
of the damaged place in the side, the "Unimak" 
is not in bad condition, and will be ready to 
go into service again in a few weeks. 

Opposing those features of proposed legis- 
lation for railroad organization which would 
place water-carriers under the control of the 
Interstate Coinmerce Commission, W. E. Clark 
of Seattle, representing the Pacific Steamship 
, Company, told the House Interstate Commerce 
Commission such legislation "might result in 
'regulating- American shipping into the bone- 
yard." Legislation to benefit water lines, Clark 
urged, should permit a free hand in competitive 
foreign commerce, including Alaska, and pro- 
vision for export and import rates on American 
rail lines applying only to water freight moved 
by American ships. 

Announcement was made during the week 
that the Pacific Export Company has chartered 
the motorship "Babinda" through the LTniversal 
Shipping Company of Seattle and will send 
a cargo of 2,000,000 feet of lumber to Bombay, 
India, from Portland. On arrival at Bombay 
the ship will be sent to an Arabian port. This 
is the fourth boat of a series of five that the 
Portland company expects to send to the 
Arabian Sea with cargoes of Oregon lumber. 
Portland exporters are getting part of the 
northern Arabian Coast trade in lumber that was 
held almost exclusively by Austria prior to the 
war. Douglas fir is now going into construc- 
tion of railways, v.'arehouses and other buildings 
that are springing up in the reconstruction work 
of this section of the world. 

The Japanese are not the only foreigners who 
are discussing the probability of coming to this 
country to have new ships built. It was an- 
nounced a few days ago that Dan Boastrom, 
managing director of the Swedish-American 
Line, said on the eve of his return to Sweden 
that he believes his company will immediately 
place orders in the United States for the con- 
struction of not less than three vessels and that 
additional orders would be placed in the near 
future. The intention of the Swedish concern, 
however, is to build motorships. Shipping men 
here say the Scandinavian shinping concerns are 
showing an indication to discard the steam 
freighters entirely. This means that if Northern 
Europe continues this class of construction until 
their tonnage becomes big enough, it will be 
impossible for any of the other nations to com- 
pete against them successfully. The American 
shipping men say it will be necessary for this 
country to adopt the same economical type in 
tin- near future or it will be impossible to main- 
tain anv considerable tonnage because the motor- 
sliin will drive all other craft from the seas. 

With the crew almost starved through lack 
of provisions and the topmasts missing on ac- 



count of storm experience, the overdue four- 
masted schooner "W. F. Jewett," Captain Olsen, 
reached San Francisco during the past week, 
164 days from Sydney. During the last five 
weeks of the passage the captain and his crew 
of twelve men were compelled to exist upon 
very meager daily rations. The "Jewett" en- 
countered a series of terrific storms two weeks 
out of the Australian port and all of the top- 
masts were lost. Several of the sails were torn 
to ribbons and after the same thing had hap- 
pened several times it was necessary to patch 
small bits of canvas to provide sufficient sails 
to make it possible to make any headway. The 
provisions ran so low that the course was di- 
rected to Julit, Marshall Islands, and there only 
a scant supply was secured. These islands are 
now in the possession of the Japanese and there 
is so little food that many of the inhabitants 
have starved to death. Unless aid is sent to 
the group it is feared that the entire population 
may be swept away before the winter is over. 
Captain Olsen said the crew went on short ra- 
tions after leaving the Marshall Islands. Numer- 
ous delays were encountered on account of calms 
and it became necessary to diminish the food for 
each man until they became so weak that it was 
difficult to handle the sails. 

Charles R. McCormick & Co. is building 
wooden steamers again. A modern steam 
schooner, designed to carry 1,500,000 feet of 
lumber, is being constructed at the St. Helen's 
yards and will be ready for launching in less 
than sixty days. She will be 250 feet in length, 
45 feet in width and will have a depth of hold 
of 18J/2 feet. The vessel will be a twin screw 
affair and will be operated by two 700 horse- 
power engines. Only some two or three steam 
schooners have been provided with twin screws 
in the history of Pacific Coast steam schooner 
construction, notably the vessels operated over 
the shallow northern bars by the Estabrook 
Company some years ago. The vessel, like all 
others designed by W. R. Hewitt, superintendent 
and naval designer of the McCormick Companj', 
will be fitted with the longitudinal steel truss, 
which tends to steady the craft and eliminate 
most of the vibration. In the event of the 
vessel being remodeled into a motorship, the 
necessary changes of installation may be eflfected 
with ease and dispatch. This is one big ad- 
vantage of creating a sound and stable craft, 
which will stand the strain of pounding internal 
combustion engines without danger of having 
the power machines shift the slightest from their 
permanent base. On account of the advantages 
derived from the installation of the steel trusses, 
the F"oundation Company of Victoria have 
adopted the method after consultation with 
Hewitt. The Pacific Coast representative of the 
Bureau of Veritas has announced that they will 
give all vessels provided with this truss the first 
class rating. Without the equipment the rating 
may be lower. 

Wholesale decapitation of heads — official and 
otherwise — is expected from official Washington 
at the San Francisco offices of the United 
States Shipping Board. The fear that has been 
instilled into the local employees of the Ship- 
ping Board is a direct result- of the appoint- 
ment of John Barton Payne as chairman of the 
board, vice Edward N. Hurley. It is the cur- 
rent belief that John H. Rosseter has already 
resigned as director of operations as the result 
of a disagreement with the new chairman, whose 
first official action was to eliminate the school 
for supercargoes at Columbia University. The 
installation of the supercargoes on some 800 
Shipping Board vessels was the pet plan of 
Rosseter, who believed that these young ship- 
ping experts would do their share toward plac- 
ing the American merchant marine on the map. 
According to the report, Payne is now planning 
to discharge all of the supercargoes as soon as 
their ships get back to an American port. Not- 
withstanding this rumor, A. J. Frye, Pacific 
Coast manager of the Emergency Fleet Corpora- 
tion, said that he had no knowledge of any 
contemplated changes in his department and 
that it was not likely there would be any con- 
siderable changes at this particular time. The 
Pacific Coast district had reached the peak of 
construction deliveries during the month of Au- 
gust, when 100,000 deadweight tons of new 
ships had been completed and delivered. Harold 
R. Ebey, assistant director of operation, said that 
he had not received any intimation that any 
of the force would be discharged. There was 
now more work than ever for all hands, he 
added, and every person connected with his de- 
jiartment was now working harder than ever. 
Captain John Leale of the Sea Service Bureau 
and Henry Avila of the Sea Training Bureau, 
made a similar report. 

F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., 3rd Floor, California 
St., nr. Montgomery. Phone, Sutter 5807 (Adv.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 




Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 

and 

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS' FEDERATION. 



THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 
328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 
Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 
NEW YORK CITY....GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa... OSCAR CHRISTIANSEN, Agt. 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va T. NELSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala w. F. CATTELL, Agent 

68% South Michael Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La o. MORTENSEN. Agent 

400% Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex D. F. PERRY, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I h. BLANKE, Agent 

„ 492 South Water Street 

PORTLAND, Me C. MARTELL, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY. N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 
Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. QUINN, Agent 

54 Commercal Place 

NEWPORT NEWS WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

BALTIMORE, Md F. R. STOCKL, Agent 

802-804 South feroaflwav 

PHILADELPHIA. Pa..O. CHRISTIANSEN, Sub. Agt 

206 Moravian Street 

MOBILE, Ala C. RAVING. Sub. Agent 

104 South Commerce Strpet 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex...G. SCHROEDER, Sub. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex J. CLAUSEN, Sub. Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 70 South Street 

Telephone John 975 and 976 
New York Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y 110 Hamilton Avenue 

Branches: 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa 138 South Second Street 

RAT,TIMORE. Md 802 Smith RroP-^wnv 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 123 Twentv-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR. Tex la") Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 3211/2 20th Street 

BOSTON. Mass 3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, Va 513 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La 40"% Fiilton Street 

MOBILE, Ala 6OV2 St. Michael Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 492 South Water Street 

PORTLAND, Maine 5 Exchange Street 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Branches: 

GLOUCESTER. Mass 163 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y JOHN R. FOLAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

PORTLAND, Maine WM. HOLLAND, Agent 

18 Commercial Wharf 

PROVINCETOWN, Mass 

FRANK L. RHODERICK, Agent 

Commercial Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. Y 

HARRY F. McGARRIGBL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 
NEW BEDFORD, Mass. CHARLES E. DOUCETT, Agt. 

LAKE DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO. Ill THOS. A. HANSON, Treasurer 

328 W. Randolph Street, Phone Franklin 278 

BUFFALO N. Y GEORGE HANSEN, Agent 

55 Main Street, Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O GEO. L. MARTIN, Agent 

308 W. Superior Avenue, Phone Main 1842 

MILWAUKEE, W1S....CHAS. BRADHERING, Agent 

162 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich K. B. NOLAN, Agent 

44 Shelby Street, Phone Cherry 842 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 47 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, O S. R. DYE, Agent 

704 Summit Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, O JOHN MORRIS, Agent 

992 Day Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. T ^^.l: ■-■■■■ V ^ 

PATRICK O'BRIEN, Agent 

122% Main Street, Phone 890 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Arenue 

Phone Bouth Chicago 1B9J 

aUPBRIOR, Wis «M Banks Avenue 

(Continued on Pace 11.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at 5an Francisco 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAIT- SCHARRENBEUG Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Offlce, Maritime Hall Building, 

B9 Clay Street, San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each weelc. 



To Insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of Octo- 
ber 3, 1917, authorized September 7. 1918. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published In the .TOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral intere.'it, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WT^DXESD.W. SEPTEMBER 24, 1919. 



SEAMEN VS. LOXGSHOREAIEN. 



Strikes and threats of strikes by Long- 
shoremen's Unions on the Pacific Coast have 
become so frequent that the Journal long 
ago ceased to comment upon them. 

It is, of course, needless to state that from 
the very inception of their organization the 
Seamen of the Pacific Coast have tried in 
every possible manner to co-operate and work 
in harmony with other groups of waterfront 
workers. But Unions no less than individ- 
uals have rights which must not be sacri- 
ficed and obligations that cannot be shirked 
for the sake of "harmony." Acting upon 
these premises — i. e., in self-preservation — 
the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, the IMarine 
Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders' Union of 
the Pacific, and the Marine Cooks and Stew- 
ards' Association of the Pacific Coast re- 
cently severed their connection with the Wa- 
terfront Workers' Federation at San Fran- 
cisco. The vote upon this withdrawal was 
unanimous in the three organizations. All un- 
derstood that it was not a question of choice, 
but of necessity. 

Acting upon instructions of their respective 
meetings, duly elected representatives of the 
three above named Unions then called upon 
the two organizations of licensed seafarers 
— the Masters, Mates and Pilots of the Pa- 
cific, and the Marine Engineers' Beneficial 
Association No. 35, both with headquarters 
at San Francisco — for the purpose of form- 
ing a Pacific Coast Council, composed of 
seafarers exclusively. There was an imme- 
diate and enthusiastic response. And the 
results have been most gratifying. Repre- 
sentatives of the five organizations named 
have had a series of conferences, and a ten- 
tative constitution for the Seafarers' Council 
of the Pacific Coast has been practically com- 
pleted and will be submitted to the compo- 
nent parts of the Council at an early date. 

In the meantime, the longshoremen of San 
Francisco, without the sanction of the Water- 
front Workers' Federation or the local Labor 
Council, and even without the constitutional 
sanction of their own membership (because 
no secret ballot was taken), arc in the midst 



of one of their periodical strikes. As usual, 
the issues of the strike are being misrepre- 
sented, and efforts are being made to involve 
the seamen's unions and other waterfront 
workers' organizations. It is for this reason, 
and for this reason only, that the Journal 
submits a mere outline of the facts regarding 
the present longshoremen's strike at San Fran- 
cisco. When the local longshoremen entered 
upon their present strike they had just se- 
cured a substantial increase of wages, they 
were enjoying "union shop" conditions and 
other advantages too numerous to mention. 
Their present strike, then, is not for higher 
wages nor for the "union shop," frequently 
misnamed the "closed shop." The strike is 
on for the enforcement of certain working 
rules. 

Now, there is no attempt made here to 
give any unsolicited advice to the striking 
longshoremen. If they really enjoy calling 
strikes at stated intervals, without the con- 
stitutional sanction of their own membership 
and without the endorsement of affiliated 
groups of workers, that is their own busi- 
ness. But they should not expect others to 
follow them on a course leading to certain 
disruption. The Pacific District L^nions of 
the International Seamen's L^nion of America 
have for years past worked under agree- 
ments, voluntarily entered into with their 
employers. These agreements have been and 
are being observed by shipowners and sea- 
men. And neither side to this arrangement 
has ever .shown a disposition to regard such 
agreements as "mere scraps of paper." 

To repeat, collective bargaining with all 
its advantages, including "recognition of the 
union," is in full force and effect in the 
marine transportation industry of the Pacific 
Coast. And whatever may be in the minds 
of those who regard agreements as "scraps 
of paper," the organized seamen of the 
Pacific Coast propose to live up to their 
agreements, any I. W. W. tactics on the part 
of certain shore workers to the contrary 
notwithstanding. 

When the organized seamen wish to go on 
strike they will vote themselves on strike, 
and when they wish to abrogate working 
agreements with their employers they will 
attend to that in their own meetings, in ac- 
cordance with constitutional methods, and in 
their usual man-fashion custom. 



THE JAPANESE BIRTH RATE. 



The Sacramento Bee has published a 
series of articles indicating the results 
which are likely to follow the passage and 
operation of the bill, now pending in Con- 
gress, for restricting immigration on the 
percentage basis. This measure has been 
strenuously urged before the House Com- 
mittee on Immigration by representatives 
of the League for Constructive Immigra- 
tion Legislation. In brief, the bill provides 
that after July 1, 1920, the number of 
aliens who may be admitted to the United 
States as immigrants in any year shall be 
limited to five per cent, of the number of 
persons of such nationality already resid- 
ing here. 

Under the operation of this percentage 
scheme, the Bee claims, wc shall have a 
Japanese population of 875,000 twenty-five 
years hence, doubling continually in ]ieriods 
of less than 20 years, which will give a 
total of approxitnatcly 216,000,000 in 160 
years. 

This assertion does seem sensational, but 



unless the figures can be disproved it is 
the cold statement of an inevitable thing 
if the proposed measure should be enacted 
into law. Fortunately, the prospects for 
the passage of such a bill are practically 
nil. And unfortunately, the result under 
the operation of the present Gentlemen's 
Agreement with Japan is equally certain, 
although slower in coming. 

Here is an illustration of the manner in 
which the present arrangement is working 
out. 

California has a population of approxi- 
mately 3,000,000. About 60,000 of these 
three million are Japanese. 

Recent statistics issued by the California 
State Board of Health for a period of six 
months showed the number of births in the 
State during that time, as follows: 

\\'hites, 23,989; Japanese, 2,195. 

If the whites had as many babies as the 
Japanese, proportionately, there would be 
107,555 white births instead of 23,989. All 
of which is very much to the point, con- 
sidering the future population of the Pacific 
Coast. And the Japanese picture brides 
are still coming. The "Gentlemen's Agree- 
ment" permits their entrj' without limita- 
tion. Thus we have a live Japanese prob- 
lem in America even though not another 
male Japanese is admitted to the country. 



DANGEROUS LOG RAFTS. 



For years the organized seamen of Amer- 
ica have urged legislation to prohibit the 
towing of log rafts at sea. When a log raft 
goes to pieces, which frequently happens, 
passing craft are likely to meet a sad fate 
unless due warning is received and excep- 
tional care is taken in navigating through 
that area, particularly at night. 

It is significant in this connection that 
the first lumber raft constructed in accord- 
ance with the patented plan of F. Bayley 
of North Sydney, for the transport of lum- 
ber from America to Great Britain in raft 
form broke apart when some distance ofif 
Newfoundland. The Engli.sh steam tug 
"Humber," which was towing it, is reported 
to have arrived at North Sydney with a 
section of the tow, leaving the remainder of 
the raft adrift at sea. Press dispatches state 
that this latter part is expected to be picked 
up although there is nothing certain about 
this. The "Humber" started from Bonne 
Bay, Newfoundland, with the raft in tow, 
and was bound for I'almouth, England. The 
raft was made up of 1661 cords of pit props. 
It was ready for the trip across the Atlantic 
some two years ago, but war conditions 
made it impossible for a start to be made. 



An item in the "marine news"' colunm of a 
San Francisco daily reads as follows: 

It is learned here the old "Roanoke," oper- 
ated here before the war by the North Pacific 
Steamship Company, is engaged in transporting 
American soldiers from France. The "Roanoke" 
is said to be the smallest transport in the 
service. 

The steamship "Roanoke," to which refer- 
ence is made, capsized and sank oflf the 
Southern California coast in May, 1916. 
Who raised her from the bottom of the sea? 



In a state of machine production the "su- 
perior race" is that whose character most 
closelv resembles the characteristics of ma- 
chinery — a large capacity for labor, little 
demand for rest, and no requirement for 
recreation, 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE COAL MLNERS. 



The organized coal miners of America 
have just concluded their annual con- 
vention. As was anticipated the miners 
followed the lead of the Railroad Brother- 
hoods and declared for the nationalization 
of coal mines. The plan, as briefly out- 
lined in press dispatches, includes purchase 
by the Federal Government of all private 
mines at their actual value as determined 
by Federal appraisers, and operation by 
the Federal Government, with equal miner 
representation upon the bodies administer- 
ing the industry and fixing wages and con- 
ditions of employment. This is, in efi^ect, 
the plan for the nationalization of the 
country's railroads, as proposed by the 
Railroad Brotherhoods. 

The miners' convention further adopted 
resolutions demanding legislation to take 
from the United States Supreme Court 
the power to declare unconstitutional laws 
passed by the elective Congress ; calling 
upon President Wilson to remove Post- 
master-General Burleson, and asking a 
new trial or full pardon for Thomas J. 
Mooncy and Warren K. Billings, the re- 
peal of the espionage act and amnesty for 
political prisoners. 

The coal miners are to be congratulated 
upon their progressive attitude toward is- 
sues of the day. With more than 400,000 
members, the United Mine Workers of 
America have a perfect right to be proud 
of their union — for that organization leads 
not only in numerical strength but in 
many other matters affecting the economic 
interests of the working people. 



GOMPERS PLEADS FOR POLICEMEN. 



President Gompers of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, has announced the names 
of the fifteen representatives of Labor who 
are to take part in the industrial conference 
called by President Wilson to meet in the 
White House, at Washington, D. C, on Oc- 
tober 6. Besides Mr. Gompers they are : 
Joseph F. Valentine, Frank Dufify, W. D. 
Mahon, T. A. Rickert, Jacob Fischer, Mathew 
Woll, Frank Morrison, Daniel J. Tobin, John 
L. Lewis, Sara A. Conboy, William H. John- 
ston, Paul Scharrenberg, John Donlin and 
M. F. Tighe. The editor of the Journal 
keenly appreciates the signal honor conferred 
upon him by this important appointment. 
He will do his utmost to advance the cause 
of Labor but in particular to plead for those 
at the bottom of the industrial ladder — the 
thousands upon thousands of workers who 
are still compelled to struggle for the right 
to organize and to deal in a collective ca- 
pacity with their employers. 



Rear-Admiral Sims recently paid a friendly 
tribute to the firemen and coal passers of the 
merchant marine who bravely stuck to their 
arduous and dangerous work while the Ger- 
man submarines were running amuck. He 
concluded : "Next time you are aboard a 
liner and see a greasy member of the fire- 
room force slip up on deck for a breath of 
fresh air, touch vour hat to him." 



The newly organized steamboatmen of the 
Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers in Cali- 
fornia are on strike for collective bargaining 
and the right to organize. Their cause is 
just and they deserve to win. 



President of the American Federation of Labor 

Defends Right of Policemen to Organize 

as Wage Earners. 



Demand the union label, 



Following the drastic order of Commissioner 
Brownlow, of Washington, D. C, notifying all 
members of Policemen's Union that unless they 
immediately severed membership with the Union 
they would be dismissed from the police force. 
President Gompers secured a conference and 
appeared before the commissioner to urge the 
rescinding of the commissioner's order. During 
the course of his arguments showing why the 
A. F. of L. issued a charter, President Gompers 
freely exhibited the obligation administered and 
furnished copies of all laws governing unions 
working under a charter issued direct by the 
A. F. of L. It was revealed that there was 
nothing in the laws or obligation that would 
interfere in any way with a policeman doing 
his full duty as prescribed by the oath he takes 
when becoming a policeman. During the con- 
ference the commissioners were unable to offer 
any valid or logical cause for the order that 
had been issued demanding that all policemen 
immediately resign from the union they had 
formed, comprising over 600 members. 

In Iiis address to the commissioners on behalf 
of the policemen, President Gompers said in 
part: 

"Gentlemen, after all, what have the people of 
the United States been fighting for? What have 
we been fighting for? Why did we organize 
this army of four million men? Why have we 
made sacrifices of food and life; given our 
money in the drives, loaned our money for 
bonds, depriving ourselves of many, many of 
the things that make up the comforts of life? 
Why? Is it that after we have won a victory 
against militarism and autocracy and imperialism 
we shall have the riglits which were exercised 
before taken from us? Autocracy does not 
merely exist in name, it exists as a fact: it is 
a state of mind; it is a state of fact. If the 
working people of the United States, policemen 
included, bad the right before the war to or- 
ganize and to affiliate with any lav.'ful, honor- 
able, patriotic body of people, surely at the 
close of the war, when we have won against 
such great odds, have won a victory that will 
go down in history, as I take it, of the greatest 
struggle in the history of the whole world. 
Anrl out of it, out of the glow, out of the 
glamour, out of the sacrifice — all of it — there 
comes the denial of a riglit, the right to organize, 
the right to affiliate with a bona fide organiza- 
tion of labor that has had a continuous and 
honorable existence for more than 39 years? 

"The declaration which j'ou have adopted, the 
regulation which you have adopted places a 
stigma on the American Federation of Labor, 
not upon anv other organization. If the com- 
missioners of the District of Columbia can_ and 
they do adojit a resolution placing that stigma 
of making the American Federation of Labor 
anatliema — what will the action be — what im- 
pression will it have upon the minds of the em- 
ployers generally? If constituted authority in 
the District of Columbia can say to these peo- 
ple, "Yon can have nothing to do with the 
American Federation of Labor." the only body 
with which they have been affiliated, then em- 
l)loyers will say 'That is the. official dictum; 
that is the judgment of the authorities in the 
capital of or.r Nation and gives us the cue to 
follow in a like course.' And we are not de- 
serving of such characterization or of such a 
stigma. 

"If Governmental authority, if employers as a 
general rule, will antagonize the American Fed- 
eration of Labor and by its actions and tendency 
cripple its efforts, you will have something to 
deal with — not with us; you will have the men 
flying where they think they can secure relief, 
and in each stage of their disappointment they 
throw themselves anywhere where some relief 
is promised, either immediate or in the future. 
For good order, for peace, tranquillity, progress, 
safety, T appeal to the commissioners to rescind 
that order. 

"It is time that we take into consideration the 
situation which exists tliroughout the world. In 
no country on t!ie face of the globe is there 
such tranquillity, such order, such a stabilizing 
influence exercised by any labor movement as 
there is by the American Federation of Labor 
in our country. 

''P)ccause these men ha\c become affiliated in 
their union with the .American Federation of 
Labor, you say to them that they must recede 
from that position or lose tlieir jobs, be without 
employment. 

"The countries of the world arc sectliing with 
revolution and revolutionary spirit. As I have 
indicated, have sliown by proof beyond ques- 
tion, that the American labor movement is of a 
constructive, not of a destructive character, 
going along within the law and within the rules 
and wiihin *he constitution antl tlie guarantees 
of the Republic of the United States: and when 
we are engaged in this work — and it is no 
mean job, let me tell you, gentlemen; and it is 
not and has not I)cen any mean job to try to 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Head(iuarters, San Francisco, Cal,, Sept. 22, 1919. 

Reatilar weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping slack; members ashore plentiful. 
Donated $100 to the striking Street and Electric 
Railway Men, No. 835 of Los Angeles, and an 
equal sum to the Cigar Makers' International 
Union now on strike in several Eastern cities. 

The following were declared elected delegates 
to the 20th Annual Convention of the California 
State Federation of Labor, to convene at Ba- 
kersfield, California, on the 6th day of October, 
1919: Ed. Andersen, E. A. Erickson, C. F. May, 
Harry Ohlsen, Paul Scharrenberg and John h! 
Tennison. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, 

Secretarv pro tern. 
Maritime Hall Bldg.. 59 Clay Street Tel. 
Kearny 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 15, 1919. 
No meeting. Shipping slow. 

J. ETCHELLS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 
Street. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 15, 1919. 
Shipping good. 

W. G. MILLARD, Agent. 
58 Powell Street E. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 15, 1919. 
Shipping medium. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 15, 1919. 

Shipping quiet. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent pro tem. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. i,^.^ ud. i. el. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 15, 1919. 
Shipping good; men scarce. 

ED. I<(JSENBERG, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Tel. Alain 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 15, 1919. 
SbiDping good: prospects good. Geo. Neuling 
and Jack Rosen were elected delegates to the 
convention of the Oregon State Federation of 
Labor. 

TACK ROSEN, Agent. 
88/2 Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 15, 1919. 
Shipping fair; men scarce. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
12814 Senulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 8, 1919. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



lleadquarters, San b'rancisco, Cal., Sept. 18, 1919. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipi)ing fair. Eugene Burke was 
elected delegate to the coming California .State 
Federation of Labor Convention, to be held in 
Bakersfield on October 6th. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 11, 1919. 
\o meeting. Sliipping medium. 

J. LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock. Room 203. P. O. Box 
214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 10, 1919. 
Shii)ping fair. Galley and cabinmen scarce. 
JOE MACK, Agent. 
613 Beacon Street. Phone Sunset 336. P. O. 
Box 54. 



DIED. 

I.udvig Joliansen, No. 1216, a native of Nor- 
wav. aire 40. Died at San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 
18."l919. 

Hans Olsson, No. 794, a native of Sweden, 
age 47. Died at sea, Aug. 19, 1919. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(By Laurence Todd.) 



Inside financiers of the steel trust ex- 
pect to make a lot of money out of the 
general strike that has been called for 
September 22. Judge Gary and his friends 
know their present arrogant attitude can- 
not be maintained — the time is past when 
even the United States Steel Corporation 
can refuse to meet and bargain with its 
organized employees. 

But there is a chance for the insiders 
to make additional millions before the 
trust bows to the workers' demands. A 
big lot of steel stock is owned on a nar- 
row margin by foolish speculators. When 
the strike comes the stock will decline in 
price. The little speculators will have to 
let go of their stock. Still others will be- 
come frightened and sell. If the strike 
lasts ten days United States Steel is ex- 
pected to fall off about $25 a share. And 
Avhat the little financiers are forced to sell 
the big fellows will buy up at an expected 
profit of that much a share. 

Gary's plan is said to be to allow the 
strike to run about two weeks and then 
offer to meet the committee of labor lead- 
ers on condition that the men first return 
to work. While his refusal to meet the 
leaders is the thing from which the strike 
order has sprung, he might, after the strikers 
had gone back to work, still "confer" with 
the leaders again and again without finally 
righting any of the wrongs of which the 
men complain. And he does not mean to 
pledge himself in advance to anything 
but a conference when he finally attempts 
to end the walkout. If the influential in- 
siders have by that time cleaned up the 
extra fortunes they anticipate they will be 
feeling mellow and satisfied enough even 
to grant the "revolutionary" right of col- 
lective bargaining — something that is al- 
ready enjoyed by free American workmen 
outside the steel principality. 

So much for the plan of the steel lords. 
What about the workers? Leaders of the 
steel unions are fully aware of the finan- 
ciers' game, but they are not going to get 
scared and sacrifice the men in the mills 
to prolonged tyranny just in order to save 
money for a set of petty speculators who 
are trying to get something for nothing 
and live the rest of their lives in idleness. 
In addition to their own desperate troubles 
the steel workers cannot make themselves 
responsible for the Wall Street lambs who 
may be sheared in the coming shake-u]). 

So, unless the steel lords back down in 
the meantime, September 22 will see the 
start of a strike for freedom in the iron 
trade which is likely to go far beyond the 
sham battle designed by a board of cor- 
porate directors. Leaders of the twenty- 
four unions immediately concerned are 
thoroughly acquainted with the mood of 
the rank and file. They have not exag- 
gerated when they warned the politicians 
and the "public" that the men who sweat 
and risk their lives in the steel industrv 
are the real agitators for this strike, and 
are determined to get .relief. 

If Judge Gary and his associates have 
a lingering belief that they can beat the 
men in their own mills, they should be 
advised to consult the Great Lakes sailors 
and the railroad workers before they cast 
the die for a finish fight. Andrew Furu- 



seth knows the mood of the sailors, and 
he is reported to be of the firm conviction 
that the Lakes mariners will not trans- 
port a ton of ore to the steel trust fur- 
naces as long as this righteous industrial 
rebellion lasts. Men on the railroads 
which supply the thirty-five plants of the 
steel trust are also counted on to assist 
by refusing to handle supplies for the 
worst labor-skinning corporation in 
.\merica. 

The steel workers' committee, which sat 
in W'ashington for many days in an effort 
to find a peaceable solution of the issue, 
was bitterly disappointed by President 
Wilson's failure to soften the hearts of 
the steel lords. His eflforts, they now ad- 
vise the countr}-, "have not been any more 
successful than the efforts of President 
Gompers and the committee representing 
the employees." The committee's state- 
ment recites at length the tyranny of the 
steel trust, and concludes: 

"Our organizers have been jailed and 
fined for attempting to speak to our mem- 
bers. Our meetings have been picketed 
by hundreds of gunmen, thugs and com- 
])any officials, in an effort to browbeat and 
intimidate the workers from meeting and 
discussing their grievances. Thousands of 
our members have been discharged for no 
other reason than having become mem- 
bers of the union. All of this, with the 
cold-blooded and brutal murder of seven 
of our organizers and members by steel 
mill guards and professional gunmen dur- 
ing the past few days, makes it impossible 
to restrain the employees any longer." 

The feeling which exists to-day is shown 
by the remark of a prominent committee- 
man who, on leaving for his home in Chi- 
cago, was asked when he expected to re- 
turn to Washington. "Not until American 
labor elects its own man to sit in the 
\\'hite House, I hope !" he exclaimed. 

Just before the steel industry strike 
date arrives the United Mine Workers are 
expected to conclude their national con- 
vention at Cleveland, after putting through 
a programme bearing fundamentally upon 
the future of American industry and the 
attitude of the workers. On September 9 
the committee on resolutions "accepted in 
])rinciple resolutions favoring the forma- 
tion of a national labor party, nationaliza- 
tion of the coal mines at the earliest pos- 
sible moment, and an alliance for co-op- 
erative political and economic effort with 
the railway brotherhoods, freight handlers 
and other transportation workers," accord- 
ing to an Associated Press report. 

While this favorable disposition on the 
part of the resolutions committee does not 
mean the proposals will certainly be ap- 
j)rovcd when they come to a vote on the 
floor of the convention, it clearly indicates 
the sentiment prevailing among a large 
proportion of the delegates, and probably 
foreshadows an affirmative vote by the 
whole body. 

Washington politicians are deeply inter- 
ested in press reports that the miners will 
go on record against universal military 
training or any other form of militarism 
in America. For several weeks past the 
National Republican Committee has been 
issuing weekly charges in its "News 
Sheet" that the Democratic party was try- 
ing to fasten a large standing army and 
peace time conscription on the countrv. 



Since the Republican leaders were among 
the most vociferous advocates of war and 
conscription, this new atitude of the Na- 
tional Committee is probably designed 
very largely to win votes from the mil- 
lions of men and women who have had 
enough of war and all its works. But it 
shows that the G. O. P. leaders have their 
ears to the ground and are hearing noises 
from the people which convince them it 
will be unsafe for any candidate for high 
office to confess that he favors military 
conscription in the United States. Mean- 
while Secretary of War Baker makes it 
easier for the Republicans by asking Con- 
gress to create a standing army of 575,000 
men and oblige all boys of 18 years to take 
military training. President Wilson has not 
yet committed himself on the subject, un- 
less Baker acted with the President's con- 
sent. 

Temporarily, the policemen's union of 
Washington has won a complete victory 
over Commissioner Brownlow and Superin- 
tendent Pullman. After obtaining a tem- 
porary injunction from the courts which for- 
bade the authorities to discharge members 
of the union, the policemen were going in- 
to court on September 11 to ask that the 
injunction be made permanent. On Septem- 
ber 10 President Wilson telegraphed from 
the Dakotas to Brownlow, "suggesting the 
advisability of postponing any issue regard- 
ing the police sitaution until after the 
forthcoming industrial conference at 
Washington." 

The President's action means that Com- 
missioner Brownlow will not dare to fire 
any of the union policemen, at least until 
Wilson gives the word. Under the cloud 
of violence by hoodlums, which is attend- 
ing the policemen's strike in Boston, 
Brownlow might have got an annullment 
of the injunction and then been free to 
■vreck the "cops' " union. 

As regards the Boston strike, it must be 
remembered that the police there are un- 
der the sole jurisdiction of the Governor 
of ^Massachusetts. The Mayor of Boston 
has nothing to do with them. For this 
reason no pressure is effective unless it 
can be made to bear upon the Governor. 
In annual convention at Greenfield, the 
Massachusetts Federation of Labor has 
instructed all Boston unions to vote on a 
proposal to back up the policemen. The 
Central Labor Council of Boston had al- 
ready pledged its support, and a general 
strike is very much in prospect at this 
writing. 

The British Trades Union Congress, sit- 
ting at Glasgow, has endorsed by an 
overwhelming majority the proposal to 
nationalize the coal mines, thus filing a 
demand that the Lloyd George Cabinet 
live up to the report of its own commis- 
sion, which was headed by Justice Sankey. 
The vote vs'as 4,470,000 to 77,000 in favor 
of nationaliz.'^tion. The resolution con- 
tained this coi:cluding sentence: "In the 
event of the Government still refusing, a 
special Congress shall be convened to de- 
cide what form of .iction shall be taken 
to compel the Government to accept." 

In pressing the resolution the president 
of the miners, Robert Smilley, declared that 
the end would be attained through the 
"common sen.so realization of the justice of 
our claims." He added that he knew in- 
cidental hardships were caused by strikes, 
but that times came when it was criminal 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



for labor not to strike to enforce justice. 
He said the miners were really fightijicr 
in the interest of all organized labor. 

James H. Thomas, president of the rail- 
road workers, also spoke in favor of the 
resolution, saying the hour had come when 
the workers must make a definite decision. 
He urged all the delegates to consider 
well where they were going before they 
should make the decision. Havelock Wil- 
son, of the Seamen's Union, spoke in vain 
against the proposal. Before this letter 
appears in print the British Trades Union 
Congress will have voted on the question 
of whether they wish to employ the strike 
more frequently as a means of obtaining 
political measures which the Cabinet or 
Parliament are slow to adopt. 



A COMPANY UNION'S SUICIDE. 



Since the introduction of the Rockefeller 
plan to befuddle the workers and defeat 
the Miners' Union in Colorado some years 
ago, following the efiforts of the unholy 
combination of Standard Oil interests and 
corrupt State officials to crush all labor 
organizations, there has been many an- 
other scheme more or less similarly de- 
vised by numerous corporations to head off 
the real organization of their employees. 

Among these may be classed the Mid- 
vale Steel and Ordnance Company and its 
subsidiary companies, the chief of which 
is the Cambria Steel Company, of Johns- 
town, Pa. Lashed by growing public sen- 
timent and faced with the declaration of the 
War Labor Board of the right of labor to 
organize and bargain collectively, the Cam- 
l)ria and associated companies brought in- 
to being what they are pleased to call a 
"Collective Bargaining Association," It 
was in Johnstown that this association was 
expected to bring forth its finest flower. 
Shop committees were organized in all de- 
partments in the great works, all carefully 
chosen and dominated by bosses of vary- 
ing degrees of importance. Elaborate by- 
laws were framed, printed in non-union 
shops and liberally distributed among the 
workers. 

This was a little less than one year ago, 
and just about the same time organizers of 
the American Federation of Labor hit 
Johnstown with instructions to launch a 
campaign for the organization of the iron 
and steel workers. This real union plan 
appealed to the workers. Many joined. 
The eminently "fair" corporation began to 
discharge men who joined the union by 
wholesale. The headquarters were picket- 
ed day and night by company police. 

When some of the discharged workers 
sought to invoke the machinery of the "Col- 
lective Bargaining Association" in the ef- 
fort to learn the cause of their being thrown 
on the street, they were politely advised 
that the "Collective Bargaining Associa- 
tion" did not function in cases of this sort. 
Thus it came about that in the early 
months of this year, when thousands of 
men were discharged in the Cambria plants, 
each one who tried to secure any redress 
found every avenue closed against him. 

True, there was an occasional meeting 
of this or that shop committee and incon- 
sequential grievances were adjusted. The 
best i)roof that the great body of the 
workers looked with suspicion on the com- 
pany union is found in the fact that the 
real unions continued a rapid growth. 



Johnstown was called a well-organized 
town. Each department, of course, had a 
number of "hard boiled" men that the 
union had failed to interest to the point 
of joining. Organizers racked their minds 
trying to figure out how these might be 
reached. The company solved the • prob- 
lem. 

The campaign for organizing the steel 
workers reached the point where President 
Gompcrs wrote the heads of the steel con- 
cerns, asking for a conference. This com- 
munication being ignored, the heads of 
twenty-four international unions, or their 
representatives, met and drafted a set of 
demands for higher wages, shorter hours 
and improvement in working conditions. 
Being submitted to a vote, the rank and 
file of the steel workers registered a 98 per 
cent, vote in favor of the demands and ex- 
pressed the determination to strike, if nec- 
essary, to secure them. 

When it became known that a strike was 
a possibility in the steel industr}^, the long- 
concealed functions of the "Collective Bar- 
gaining Association" were disclosed. Star 
chamber sessions of "committees" were held 
in Johnstown and in other sections where 
were located plants of the Midvale Steel. 
At these meetings, hand picked delegates 
were named, and the date fixed for the 
holding of a "convention" at Atlantic City. 

Parlor car transportation was furnished 
the "delegates," and the bills in the high 
class and expensive hotels in the popular 
summer resort were all taken care of by 
the Midvale Steel and Ordnance Company. 
Moreover, to prove what might be accom- 
])lished by the company plan of collective 
bargaining, it is said that each delegate so 
inclined was provided with congenial 
fominine companionship. 

As might be expected, the company real- 
ized at once on its investment, for the 
"convention" lost no time in passing reso- 
lutions denouncing profiteering grocerymeu 
— no mention was made of profiteering steei 
men — and declaring that the cost of living 
must "be abated by diligent, efficient and 
conscientious labor, by thrift and the avoid- 
ance of waste and extravagance." 

But the meat of all the resolutions is 
contained in the following gem : "That the 
persistent and unceasing demand of work- 
men in all classes and kinds of industries 
for a shorter day's work and an increased 
wage, in order to meet the present high 
cost of living, is uneconomic and unwise 
and should not be encouraged." 

When the delegates reached home they 
observed a marked change from the pleas- 
ant atmosphere so noticeable at Atlantic 
City. In spite of the widely heralded press 
reports sent out by the Midvale Steel Com- 
pany that the delegates to the "convention" 
represented its 30,000 employees, the first 
the workers in the mills knew of their op- 
position to the shorter workday and wage 
increases was in the newspaper reports of 
the "convention." 

This was the last straw. Even the "hard 
boiled" men could not stand for this. They 
flocked into the unions. The problem of 
reaching these men had been solved and 
the organizers were swamped with applica- 
tions for membership. 

For the first time in its history, the Cam- 
bria Steel ])lant did not operate last Labor 
Day. For a month previous to Labor Day 
the word had been sent among the men 



that any who failed to report for work on 
that day need not report on the day follow- 
ing. But practically all were in the union, 
and all union men participated in the pa- 
rade. So what could the Cambria Steel 
Company do? 

It cither had to back down or fire its 
entire crew. It backed down. None of the 
men were discharged. 

Banners in the parade spoke the senti- 
ments of the men. One of them read : "We 
are the REAL representatives of the Cam- 
bria Steel Company." . Another : "We are 
for shorter hours and more pay." Still an- 
other : "The Collective Bargaining Associa- 
tion must go." 

The same story comes from Coatesville 
and Nicetown, where other Midvale Steel 
Company plants are located. The resolu- 
tions of the Atlantic City "representatives" 
l)rov6d to be an overdose, and now men 
heretofore backward are stampeding into 
the unions. The company union in these 
places has gone into the discard. 

Other company unions, becoming weary 
of the vain struggle to keep back the tide 
of real unionism that is sweeping the coun- 
try, and desiring to make a painless exit 
into oblivion may gain some valuable point- 
ers from the stunt staged at Atlantic City 
by the Midvale Steel Company. 



Demand the union label. 



Labor's Economic Platform 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not e.xist and rigid de- 
fense of them where tliey have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

l.r Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build 'of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or 
compartments used for habitation. 

10. We favor a system of finance whereby 
niwney siiall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Pags 3.) 



delegates that a large number of the postal 
employees would resign and seek other 
cm])loyment. 

President Gompers spoke before the con- 
vention and warned the delegates that cer- 
tain interests were working in concert to 
crush organized labor in this country. He 
informed the delegates that a strike should 
only be indulged in as the last resort, and 
to proceed with the greatest caution when 
that was under consideration. 

Gilbert E. Hyatt was elected president 
and Thomas E. Flaherty w^as re-elected 
secretary-treasurer. Seven vice-presidents 
Avere also selected. 



Woodcarvers' Advances. 
The International Woodcar^er, official 
organ of the Woodcarvers' Association, re- 
{)orts the following wage increases: Syra- 
cuse branch secured an advance of 10 to 
18 cents per hour; Detroit branch raised 
wages 15 cents an hour, making the wages 
90 cents and $1 ; Minneapolis and St. Paul 
branch received increases, as result of a 
strike, of 5 cents an hour on August 15, 
5 cents October 1, and 5 cents January; San 
Francisco branch raised rates from $6 to 
$7 per day ; New York branch also secured 
an advance of $1 a day; Montreal branch 
was conceded an advance of 20 per cent., 
bringing wages up to 75 cents an hour; 
Chicago branch secured a minimum of 85 
cents per hour, and Rochester branch ad- 
vanced rates 15 cents per hour. 



Chemical Society President Favors Labor. 
A new alliance between labor and science 
as a solution of some of the economic diffi- 
culties of to-day was proposed by Dr. Wil- 
liam H. Nichols, president of the Ameri- 
can Chemical Society, in his annual address 
at the public meeting of the society in 
Philadelphia, Pa. Doctor Nichols said that 
the American Federation of Labor could de- 
pend on the co-operation of the chemical 
society in backing up a broad programme 
of scientific and technical research by the 
Government as a matter of major impor- 
tance to the national welfare. This pro- 
gramme was urged by the Federation of 
Labor in a resolution adopted at the recent 
convention at Atlantic City. The offer was 
considered significant as coming from Doc- 
tor Nichols, who is president of the Gen- 
eral Chemical Company of New York, 
which employs thousands of men in its 18 
large plants in the United States. 

"I hope and believe," said Doctor Nichols, 
"that this matter, coming as it does from 
a new direction, will be seriously consid- 
ered by the proper authorities. Its urgency 
is thoroughly appreciated by the workers 
on whose eflficiency so much depends. 

"This opens the way to a scientific solu- 
tion of vital questions about which there 
have been fundamental differences of opin- 
ion based largely upon the point of view. 
Many hold that labor is a commodity which 
it was their best interests to get the most 
of for the least money, while others be- 
lieved that labor was the sole source of 
all wealth and that the fewer hours' work, 
the smaller the output of those hours, 
the better it would be, somehow or other, 
for the laboring classes. 

"I have cited the extreme views for pur- 
poses of illustration, realizing that some- 



where between the two would be found the 
great body of all reasonable and thoughtful 
men. 

"Many of the fundamental truths con- 
cerning labor and its conditions would 
never be discovered by the scientist per so, 
because he has not had the benefit of prac- 
tical preparation. Let our friends of the 
American Federation of Labor not be con- 
tent with what the Government can do in 
the line of their resolution, good as it has 
been and will be, but let them start a care- 
fully planned series of researches them- 
selves and follow them up imtil the truth 
stands revealed. They can depend upon 
the assistance of this ffreat societv." 



Win After Hot Contest. 

.Striking employees at the Canadian Vick- 
ers Shipbuilding plant have won a big vic- 
tory over this concern, which has been vig- 
orous in its opposition to organized labor. 
\\'ages of the basic trades are advanced 7 
cents an hour, making a 75-cent minimum. 
Laborers are advanced 'from 35 cents an 
hour to 45-cent minimum, and the 47-hour 
work week has been established. 

The company spent large sums of money 
to defeat the strikers, and when the latter 
won the local press made sparse mention of 
the incident. 



Father Fires Son. 
John Miller, Jr., son of the head of the 
Keystone AA'atch Company, of Riverside, 
X. J., who went into the factory to "learn 
the business from the bottom up," was fired 
by his father, following a walkout of 1,000 
of the company's employees, whom he is 
alleged to have aided in unionizing. Miller, 
who has been interested in unions ever 
since he put on overalls, is said to have 
been instrumental in organizing more than 
70 per cent, of the employees. 



SALT PRODUCED IN 1918. 



WHAT'S INSIDE OF US. 



A man weighing 150 pounds will contain 
approximately 3500 cubic feet of gas — oxy- 
gen, hydrogen, and nitrogen — in his consti- 
tution, which at 80 cents per 1000 cubic 
feet would be worth $2.80 for illuminating 
purposes. He also contains all the necessary 
fats to make a fifteen-pound candle. His 
system contains twenty-two pounds and ten 
ounces of carbon, or enough to make 780 
dozen, or 9360 lead pencils. There are about 
fifty grains of iron in his blood and the 
rest of the body would supply enough of 
this metal to make one spike large enough 
to hold his weight. A healthy man contains 
fifty-four ounces of phosphorus. This deadly 
poison would make 800,000 matches, or 
enough poison to kill 500 persons. This, 
with two ounces of lime, make the stiff 
bones and brains. No difference how sour 
a man looks (says the Electrical Experi- 
menter), he contains about sixty lumps of 
sugar of the ordinary cubical dimensions, 
and to make the seasoning complete, there 
are twenty spoonfuls of salt. If a man were 
distilled into water he w'ould make about 
thirty-eight quarts, or more than half his 
entire weight. He also contains a great 
deal of starch, chloride of potash, mag- 
nesium, sulphur, and hydrochloric acid. 
Break the shells of 1000 eggs into a huge 
pan or basin, and you have the contents to 
make a man from his toenails to the most 
delicate tissues of his brain. 



Because of the universal use of salt in 
food and in food preservation and the lack 
of any substitute its output would be re- 
duced only by most unusual conditions. 
There is always a general tendency toward 
an increase in production in the United 
.'■^tates on account of the steady increase 
in population. The increasing use of salt 
l)y chemical and other industries helps to 
maintain a larger production from year 
to year. In view of the shortage of labor 
and other difificulties which hampered many 
industries during the war, a reduction in 
the output of salt might have been ex- 
pected, but there was nevertheless a con- 
siderable increase. Figures compiled un- 
der the direction of R. W. Stone, of the 
L'nited States Geological Survey, Depart- 
ment of the Interior, from reports fur- 
nished by all producers of salt in the 
I'nited States show a total output of 
7,238.744 short tons, an increase of 260,567 
short tons, or 4 per cent., over the output 
in 1917. The total value was $26,940,361, 
an increase of 30 per cent, over the total 
value in 1917, which was $19,940,442. 

The production of salt in 1918, by States, 
is shown in the following table : 

Short tons. 

California 204,957 

Kansas 819,504 

Michigan 2,403,125 

Xew York 2,130,530 

Nevada 970 

Ohio 1,089,887 

Texas 79,657 

Utah 94,204 

\^'est Virginia 26,077 

Hawaii, Idaho, Louisiana, New 

Mexico, Oklahoma, Porto Rico, 

and Virginia 389,833 



7,238,744 
The production of rock salt amounted 
to 1,683,941 short tons, an increase of 
about 5 per cent., but the value was $5,- 
684,661, an increase of 46 per cent. The 
output of evaporated salt amounted to 
2,724,203 short tons, valued at $20,010,435, 
an increase of nearly 10 per cent, in quan- 
tity and 34 per cent, in value. The pro- 
duction of salt in brine was 2,830,600 short 
tons, valued at $1,245,265, a decrease of 2 
per cent, in quantity, but an increase of 
15 per cent, in value. 

Michigan, New- York, and Ohio con- 
tinued to hold first, second, and third 
places respectively in quantity produced. 



GOMPERS PLEADS FOR POLICEMEN. 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



.'stabilize tlie activities of the people of the 
United States; and they have great cause for 
(h'ssatisfaction by reason of the fact that they 
are made the victims of the greed and avarice 
commonly known as food profiteering in one 
form or another; it has not been any easy 
matter. With the ending of the war, when so 
large a proportion of the workers of our coun- 
try were engaged in the production of the 
things for war, engaged in the production of 
things for destruction, and now with the armis- 
tice and the practical ending of the war, when 
all that species of industry have come to a full 
stop, and we, employers and captains of in- 
dustry and commerce, have not been able to 
have the judgment or the enterprise to get back 
to somctiiing like normal conditions of industry. 
and large numbers of our people are unemployed 
and many of them who are employed are not 
earning enough wages in order that they may 
have an opportunity to live at all, and with the 
increased cost of living in every field of their 
lives; and then to find that an attempt has been 
made to organize among them the policemen 
for the purposes of what? To seek here some 
relief from those grievances which they are re- 
quired to bear in the service." 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



"SHARING THE RISK." 



The principal argument against the 
Plumb plan is the simplest to refute. That 
is the argument that the railroad employees 
are asking to share the profits of the in- 
dustry without willingness to share the 
risk. The argument rises from the habit 
of thinking of the railroads as being like 
any private enterprise, in which there are 
risks and gains. It rises also from the 
faulty understanding of the nature of 
"profits" which labor would receive by the 
Plumb plan. It is an argument, curiously 
enough, that has been raised by both the 
Wall Street press and by leading Socialists 
in Europe; the former holding to theif 
ideas of the laws of private business, the 
latter objecting to "profits" and to laboi 
working for "profits." 

In both instances the argument is no 
argument, merely because the facts do not 
justify it. We are not here in the dilemna 
of choosing between philosophies, or of try- 
ing to change economic laws. 

For the operation of railroads is a State 
function. The Supreme Court in stating 
this, remarked that it never needed a court 
decree to establish the truth. The State 
has merely delegated to private interests its 
own powers. The railroad corporation is 
not comparable with any private corpora- 
tion. It has, on the one hand, greater 
rights — rights of the State to condemn 
property and to levy taxes, or transporta- 
tion charges. It has, on the other hand, a 
limited use of the property it owns, which 
can only be used for public service and can 
only be valued in so far as it represents 
honest and prudent investment made in 
serving the public. 

There is no private risk in a State indus- 
try. The city water works, the municipal 
power plant, do not lose money if there 
is a deficit; the public which owns them 
foots the bills. Just so with the railroads. 
Yes, the railroads even when privately 
operated. The Supreme Court has also de- 
creed this, though it is as self-evident as 
the truth that operating railroads is a State 
function. The State — that is, the people — 
bear the risk of the railroad industry. If 
they hire private capital to do their work, 
they are required by the laws of the land 
to pay this hired capital a fair return. The 
owners of the private interests, according 
to the courts, must be paid a "fair return" 
on all the money they have prudently in- 
vested in the service of the public. 

The demands of Wall Street for a guar- 
antee of the "property investment account" 
of the railroads are not vicious, because a 
guarantee is vicious, but because Wall 
Street demands a guarantee on watered 
stock — because Wall Street demands a 
guarantee on money it never invested in 
the service of the public. 

By the old S3"stcm of finance the public 
oflfered the inducement of safe investment 
in order to interest corporations in building 
and operating the railroads. It was willing 
to pay slightly more than the cost of trans- 
portation — in other words, profits — to se- 
cure service. 

The Plumb plan is not, as is frequently 
charged, a device to ofifer the inducement 
of profits to labor rather than to capital. 
The "profits" under the Plumb plan are not 
in the same category as the profits paid to 
investors. Ry the present system the pub- 
lic assumes all the risks, pays the actual 



cost of service and a fair return in addition 
to the cost. By the Plumb plan the public 
assumes the risk, pays the actual cost and 
no profit. 

AVhat, then, are the "profits" in the 
Plumb plan? 

The Interstate Commerce Commission, 
by the terms of the proposed law, fixes 
the rates to meet the actual estimated cost. 
Then, if by savings, by ingenuity and by 
more intense effort, the employees suc- 
ceed in operating the railroads at less than 
the estimated cost they share their sav- 
ings with the public. And if their share 
of the savings once reaches five per cent, 
of the gross operating revenue, rates must 
be accordingly reduced. 

To argue that such profits should in- 
volve a commensurate risk is to ask that 
the em])]oyees, in event of a deficit, be 
deprived of a portion of their wages. It 
is to ask that the employees assume a 
burden that private capital has never 
borne. If the deficit is caused by bad 
management, the lease should be forfeit- 
able, and so is, under the Plumb plan ; so 
now, under present conditions there is no 
guarantee for railroad investments that 
have been foolishly administered. 



A COG IN THE MACHINE. 



Hard-boiled Smith, the army officer found 
guilty of inflicting cruel punishment upon 
military prisoners and sentenced to three 
years' imprisonment, is not an inhuman 
degenerate who finds pleasure in the tor- 
ture of the helpless, but merely a cog in 
the military machine, a product of the sys- 
tem of which he is part. The General in 
command in the Paris district knew and ap- 
proved of the senseless brutalities prac- 
ticed, denies that they were improper or 
unusual, and has recommended that Smith's 
sentence be cut in half. This attitude of 
the higher-ups is logical and consistent 
with their approval of the court martial 
death sentences imposed for trivial ofifenses 
and commuted by President Wilson to 
short terms of imprisonment. It shows 
clearly that a democratic army never was 
and never will be ; that democracy and mili- 
tarism are as far apart as the poles. — The 
Painter and Decorator. 



ROME WITHOUT NEWSPAPERS. 



For a month Rome has been deprived of 
newspapers. Parliament is sitting; elector- 
al reform is being discussed; the world 
without the Italian frontiers is not exactly 
bereft pf incidents worth recording. All 
that is of no account. Rome has had to go 
without newspapers, and consequently 
without news, except what she tardily gets 
from provincial sheets. The reason is the 
usual one, a strike. The printers demand- 
ed higher pay, the newspaper owners re- 
fused. Both parties proved adamant. Rome 
did not insist on an immediate solution, 
and thus the incredible and impossible has 
happened. The Eternal City has achieved 
the distinction of being the first capital of 
a great country to stop publication of all 
her important papers for one whole month. 
^^^^at next? — Christian Science Monitor. 



It has been estimated by a European 
scientist that the commercial value of 
electricity in a fla.sh of lightning lasting 
one-thosuandth c)f a second is 29 cents. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Pa«e B.) 
LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone, Seneca 48. 

THOS. CONWAY, Secretary. 

ED . HICKS, Treasurer. 

Branches: 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 74 Bridge Street 

Phone, 428-W. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 332 Banks Avenue 

Phone, Broad 131. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

Phone, S. C. 1599. 

TOLEDO, Ohio 704 Summit Street 

Phone, Main 4519. 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1012 Superior Avenue 

Phone, Main 866. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone, South 598. 

DETROIT, Michigan 44 Shelby Street 

^,,,^ Phone, Cadillac 543. 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Ave. 

Phone, Central 8460. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone, 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street 

Telephone Seneca 896. 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary. 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, III 406 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 85 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 704 Summit Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

Relief Stations: 
Ashland. Wla. Ogdensburg, N. T 

Ashtabula Harbor, . O. Oswego, N Y 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Dulutli, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

E.scanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven. Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Wis. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Ludington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 66 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 28* 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% 3rd Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU. H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 64 Pike SL Viaduct. P. O. Box 876 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal... 613 Beacon Street. P. O. Box 67« 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 
SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 54 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters. 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C). Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

PETERSBURG Alaske 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA. Ore P. O. Box l»i 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION. 
SAN FRANCISCO Cal 9 Mission Street 

rhoiip Sutter 220.'', 



MARINE FIREMEN'S AND OILERS' UNION OF 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

VANCOirVER. B. C 329 Columbia Avenus 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 



B. C. COAST STEWARDS. 
VANCOUVDR. B. C •!• Rlch&rda BtrMt 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News 



The skilled chemists and assist- 
ants of the New York City Health 
Department have become affiliated 
with the Union of Technical Men 
of the American Federation of Labor. 

Molders employed by the Rock 
Island, 111., Tool Company ceased 
work when their demand for an 
eight-hour day and $6 per day was 
refused. The company had previ- 
ously exacted a nine-hour day. 

After being idle for 17 weeks, 2,000 
employees of the Newport Rolling 
Mill and the Andrews Steel Com- 
pany, of Newport, Ky., have returned 
to work. The company will recog- 
nize the union formed by employees. 

United Mine Workers of Alabama 
are making a fight against the con- 
vict lease system of that State in an 
endeavor to keep convicts out of 
competition with free labor of the 
mines and on the markets of the 
world. 

The movie picture house proprie- 
tors in Minneapolis and St. Paul 
have made concessions that proved 
acceptable to the movie picture op- 
erators. The new wage rates repre- 
sent an advance of 30 per cent, over 
the previous pay received. 

Officers of the Printing Pressmen 
and Assistants' International Union 
report recent gains in over a score 
of localities. These gains include 
wage increases, improved working 
conditions and a strengthening of 
the various locals. The highest ad- 
vance is reported from Lansing, 
Michigan, where an increase of $8 
a week for pressmen has been se- 
cured. 

Employees of the French Manu- 
facturing Company and the Scranton, 
Pa., pump works, have been notified 
by the War Labor Board pf an in- 
crease in wages, retroactive to Jan- 
uary 1 last. The dispute was sub- 
mitted 11 months ago. The award 
gives men an eight-hour day and 10 
cents an hour increase, while the re- 
troactive feature will bring about 
$150 in back pay. 

Six thousand members of the 
Ladies' Garment Workers Union of 
New York, are on strike for reduced 
hours and increased pay. About 1,000 
of this number will soon return to 
work, as offers of settlement have 
been received from 100 firms. Their 
demands include the 44-hour week, 
a minimum of $50 to tailors, $40 to 
machine helpers, $35 to female help- 
ers and $45 to alteration tailors. 

Four organizers of the iron and 
steel committee, now actively working 
to organize the iron and steel work- 
ers, were fined by Mayor Crawford, 
of Duquesne, Fa., $10 each for at- 
tempting to hold a meeting. They 
paid their fines under protests. This 
is the second time organizers have 
been arrested and fined in this city 
on the same charge recently. A 
score of persons in the audience 
were also fined $10 each on charges 
of alleged disorderly conduct. 

"There is a surprisingly large 
amount of union buttons seen among 
the colored workers since the recent 
campaign inaugurated by the Amal- 
gamted Meat Cutters and Butcher 
Workers' Union of North America 
for new members," say's the Labor 
Bulletin, of Kansas City, Kans. 
"Like lots of the white workers, the 
colored laboring men are beginning 
to find out that their real friends are 
the men they work with every day, 
and not the politicians and em- 
ployers." 



Office Phone Elliott 1196 



Established 1S9« 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Date Methods In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

COMPASSES ADJUSTED 

712-13-14 SEABOARD BLDG. FOURTH and PIKE STREETS 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Sjuf O K^ P R ^ ^** *^^* *^'^. ^^^^^ ("^ ^'6*^* blue) appears on the 
i'l V^ IV Hi IV O box in whirVi voii are sprvpH 



box in which you are served. 



Issued by AuUioiilyoi the Cigar Makeis' InternatVrj'nai Union of America. 

^,.Tc?v Union-made Cigars. 

'S/i^X/^\i\ J»tlUtllO'IMii3CWIl«fia"«U«M;iC'WLUIIIO»ol A»«na. »nC»M«MI«i4ev<llMI«tklld 

*'*\;_2iiX«/ *'ll"'"*9«»«»''»°»<'"l»l»i'«'l<ie poniiliM jc«rti>nl»l»ifc 



Seattle, Wash , Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postolflce, letters addreesed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mall until arrlvea. 

Aase, Olaf Anderson, Sextes 

Abrahamson, HelftanAndersson, Gustav 
Abolin, K. Andersen Alf. -163S 

Abrahamson, John Anderson, Albert 
Anderson John (6) Andersen, Olaf -2099 
Adams, A. D. Andersen, Herman 

Anderson Adolf (4) Anderson, John N. 
Anderson Harry (2) Anderson, Julius 
Anderson, Chris Andewig, H. 
Anderson, John -1800Antonsen, Martin(3) 
Andresen, Jorgen Akerstrom, O. R. 
Anderson, Albert Antonsen, Anton G. 

H. (2) Alquist, Crls 

Anderson, Charles Alexis, H. 
Andersson W. (2) Aspengreen, E. 
Anderson Rasmus 



' Bang, Oskar 
I Backlund, K. 

Backman, Axel 

Backstrom, K. 

Belmont, Joe 

Berg, Wm. 
I Beversdorf, E. 



Bjorkstrom, A. 
Bloomgren, Adolf 
Bodie, Wm. 
Boyle, James E. 
Bolstad, Alf. 
Borgan, Arne 
Brown, Calvin H. 



I Bertleson, Bertie J. Bratson, Jos. 
Borgkvest, Axel Bruce, Albert 
Berentsen, A. M. Brun, Dick 

|Berkland, Hans J. Burglss, J. W. 

I Bibbs, Golden S. Bund, Nils 



Bjorseth, K. 
Campbell, John 
Camino, C. C. 
Carlson, Herbert 
Carlsen, Gust. 
Carlin, Carl A. 
Cartveit, C. C. 
Carlson, Gus. 



Burggraf, Albert 
Carlson, C. A. 
Carlson, Chas. H. 
Carlson, Gunner 
Carstensen, Carsten 
Casperson, Carl 
Carruthers, M. 
Clausen, Christ. 



Carlson, Oscar -454 Corron, George R. 
Carlson, John -1586 Cochrane, Robt. 
Carlson, Ingwald Cortes, P. 
Dahl, Die Ditmanson, D. 

Davies, Chester O. Dreyer, J. 
Davies, E. R. Dunwoody, George 

Delaney, John Douglas, W. 

Dehler, J. Dunn, W. G. 

Dekker, D. Button, H. 



Enoksen, A. 
Eliassen, H. O. 
Elstad, John 
Klzp. Carl 
Ellis, J. 
Elling, Alfred 
Forevaag, C. 
Fair, Phaltl 
Feedge J. A. 
Ferguson, Robt. 
Felsch, C. 
Flatten, James G 
Flemmlng, M. 
Gabrielsen, P. 
Gamber, J. J. 
Gerson, Chas. 
Gibler, Karl 
Hanson, Olaf 
Hanson, Andrew 
Hansen, John P. 
Hanson, Josef 
Hanson, Peter 
Hanson, G. E. 
Hanson, 



Elisen, Sam 
Evsner, Ingvar 
Erikson, Erik 
Erikson, Otto 
Erickson, K. 
Erickson, J. R. 
Fox, Andrew 
Folks, H. 
Fuve, A. M. 
Fuidge, E. W. 
Franson, O. 
Fredrecksen, F. 

Groth, Karl 
Grunbock, John 
Qusjoos, O. 
Gustafsson, O. 
Hasselborg, Gus. 
Henrekson, E. 
Hendreckson, H. 
Hoik, Geo. 
Holmquist, Einor 
Holland, J. 



John HIU, P. 

Halley, Wm. Hilliard, 

Haraldson. Johan 
Halseth, Ed. 
Inglebretsen, Olaf 
Iverson, Andrew 
Jacobson, Johan 
Janson, E. A. 
Jansen, Emil 
Jensen, Nils 
Jensen, Henry 
Jensen, Hans 
Johnson, A. W. 
Johansen, Ed. 
Johnsen, Jacob 
Johansen, J. 
Johnson, Peter M 
Johansen, Karl -2127 
Karlstrand, G. Kines, 

Kastl, H. 



C. R. 
Hunter, G. H. 

Isakson, Karl 
Iverson, Ole 
Johnson, E. 
Johnson, Peter -2313 
Johnsen, A. 
Johansen, Jakob 
Johnson, G. 
Johnstone, Walter 
Johansen, Karl 
Johnsen, John 
Johnsen, Adler -2565 
Johanssen. Erik 
Johnson, P. 



Karlson, K. 
Karlsen, O. 
Korsama, N. J. 
Kallio, F. 
Karlsen, E. 
Kempson, M. 
I^arsen, HJalmer 
I^rsen, Segurd 
I^arsen, G. 
T^ampl, F. 
I^arsen, Alex 
Larsen, C. A. 
Larson, E. G. 
l^arson. Fred 
Tvee. C. 
Leskenen, F. 



J. H. 
Knudson, A. J. 
Koppen, O. 
Kother. H. 
Koppen, B. 
Kristiansen, .1. 
Karhanan, E. 
Kutin, John 
Ijeeuwen, A. V. 
Lul. T. 

Leeravaeg, H. J 
TJdston, C. 
I>orgenian. F. 
IjUnd, Wm. 
Luetter, T. 
Ijundberg, E. 
T.,undgren, C. 
Ludersson, W. 



1240 



Mortensen, K. A. 
Mathesen, Segurd 
Mortensen, H. 
Martindale, John 
Mardinsen, C. 
Malmqvist, C. 
Manus, Johanus 
Mordison, A. 
Malone, B. 
Mercer, H. 
Meckelson, J. 
Melby, V. 
Meloen, Harry 
Melder, Albert 
Meskelsson, Erik 
Mikkelsen, K. -16 
Nelson, Emil 
Nelson, Carl 



Nelson, 
Nelson, 



A. C. 
A. W. 



Nelson, John 
Nelson, Robert 



Olsen, 
Olsen, 
Olsen, 
Olson, 
Olsen, 
Olnes, 
Olsen, 
Olsen, 



Chris -l: 
Nlc , 
Albert 
Adolph 
Ferdinand 
Laurits 
Arne 
Robert 



Pakki. Emil 
Paaso, A. 
Paterson, P. 
Paklesen, K. 
Permin, Jens C. 
Pederson, E. P. 
Petterson, Adolf 
Pederson, Carl 
Pestoff, S. 
Peterson, Karl E. 
Jlasmussen, Christ 
Rantenen, H. 
Reenhold, Gustov 
Robenson, W. N. 
Rosenberg, Adolf 
Sandberg, Otto 
Sandel, F. S. 
Sather, H. 
Sassi, W. 
Schmidt, W. 
Schuur, H. 
Seppala, Emll 
Seyfried, M. 
Shoberg, J. 
Simmons, John 
Smith, Emll 
Sodwiok, Ben 
Sorenson, H. 
Solberg, Olaf 
Taice, John J. 
Tapper, A. E. 
Tessabia, B. 
Thorsen, Herman 
Thammeson, Ole 
Thorsen, Hans 
Thorsen, Victor 
Uhlnes, F. 
Vesgood, Jens 
Ward, D. 
Waggoner. Sam 
Walters, Al 
Walters, Ted 
Watt, John B. 
Weld, L. A. 
West, J. N. 
Winter, Theodore 



Miller, Frank 

Miller, A. M. 

Morrison, J. D. 

Morken, M. L. 

Moore, J. 

Morrison, Wm.' 

Morgan, Wm. 

Moor, Thos. 

Moen, Robt. 

MacKay, James 

McGuire, T. 

McKenzie, D. J. 

McGuire, J. 

MacKay, Thos. 

McGregor, J. 
;20McCoy, James 

Neilsen, Axel 

Noren, B. 

Nord, C. W. 

Nllsen, Andreas 

Nilsen, Hans L. 

Nimen, August 
9 Olsen, Hans 

Olsson, C. 

Olsen, Carl 

Olson, John 

Otterspear, Wm. 

Overland, Oskar 

O'Keefe, T. F. 

Pearson, Gustov 
Pederson, John 
Pettersen, Bjorne 
Pedersen, Karl 
Pelta, Henry 
Peterson, Ole 
Plantiko, W. 
Powell, H. 
Porter, A. 
Punls, A. 
Rosenthal, W. 
Rohman, G. 
Rosenblad, Albln 
Rund, Nils 

Sorenson, Tom 
Sorger, E. 
Strand, Alfred 
Stentz, P. 
Steffensen, S. 
St. Clair, Thomas 
Stratton, M. 
Suominen, F. 
Sundby, Alfred 
Sverdrup, Thorwald 
Svendson, John A. 
Swanson, Wm. 
Syversen, Oskar 

TlTorn, Arvid 
Tonneson, Anton 
Tomquist, Henry 
Troverson, Louis 
Tyrrell, J. 
Tuorilla, J. 



Voldby, P. 
Wilson, Gus 
Wilson, C. 
Withberg, Alf 
Williams, Lloyd 
Wilhelmsen, Martin 
Wirta, Geo. 
WuUum, J. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 



Anderson. Andrew 
Andersen, Olaf 
Barrot, G 
Brandt, Arv. 
Burmelster. T. 
Brun. Mattla 
Brant, Max 
Brandt H. 
Carlson. Osc. 
Cormack, W. C. 
Dlschler, P. 
Gomes. M. G. 
Hedrlfk, Jack 
Jansson, John 
Jansson, -T. A. 
Jensen. Joe 
Johanssen, John F. 
Johannessen. Alf. 
Johannessen. Jonas 
Johnson, Hllmar 
Khamp, S. 
KInnunen. AnttI 
iCp„nMl,. J P 
Lutke, F. C. A. 
Vfalkoff. Pet*^r 
Malmberg. R. 
Martinson. Adolph 



Melners. Herman 
Miller, F. W. 
Miller, Walter 
Murk, Chas. 
^cMvMian. I. 
Nystrom. R. 
Olesen, W. 
Olson. A. 
Olson. W. 
Olsen. Alf 
Patter.ion, E. G. 
P«Hlersen, N. B 
Petersen, Axel 
Rahlf. J. 
RIsenlus. Sven 
Rosenblad. Otto 
Rubins, C. .\. 
."mvth. J. B. 
Roderlund, I'no 
Rtalt. Axel 
Stanbeck. A. 
Sven.oon. B. 
Sundqulst. Walter W 
Torln. Giistaf A. 
Valfors. ArvId 
Williams. T. C. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



T. H. TJndross, formerly on 
schooner "Commerce," is requested 
to call at the office of the IT. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, San Fran- 
cisco,' Cal. 9-10-19 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER & HATTER 

Alatka Outfitter 

TWO BIO STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and Flr«t 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Creamatory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. 8. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 
Room 4140 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Waih. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

S16-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Poi* 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



VESTENHAVER BROS. 

CUT-RATE STORE 

$5.00 Less on a Suit or Overcoat, 
Shirts. Shoes, Oil Skins, Rubber Boots, 
Overalls, Underwear, Sox, Pants. 

We make a special effort to carry 
in stock everything for 

SAILORS and MILL MEN 

UNION STORE 

208 East Heron St., - Aberdeen 
Between Rex and Wear Theaters 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCX OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS. 

SHOES. COLLAIta, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRT* 

A. M. BENDET80N 

321 East Heron Street • Aberdaan 

Exclusive O^ner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measur« 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F. Sts., Aberdeen, Wash, 
let and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 

"Ole and Charley" 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors' Rest" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



THE SEAMEN'S ;jOURNAL 



13 




Poverty 
is A Crime! 

IT isn't a crime to be poor, any wore 
than it ia to be murdered. The poverty- 
Btricken man is not a criminal. Ue 
is a victim of a crime for which others 
as well as himself are responsible. Henry 
George 33 years ago gave a lecture be- 
fore the Knights of Labor the title of 
which was 

"The Crime of Poverty" 

It has since become a classic and haa 
tonched the spark of ambition in the 
liearts of thousands of men and inspired 
them to better things. 
Yon can get a copy of thia grippine lec- 
ture, well printed in a neat, cloth-bound 
book, and THE PUBLIC, A Journal of 
Democracy, for 13 weeks for only 6S 
cents. Let THE PUBLIC be your in- 
terpreter, aa it Is for many of the great 
liberal thinkers of the day: Brand Whit- 
lock, U. S. Minister to Belgium; Wm, 
C. Colver, Federal Trade Commissioner; 
Ray Standard Baker, and hundreds o£ 
others. 

Frank P. Walsh, Joint-Chair- 
nan of the National War Labor 
Board says: 

Every worker in America should 
be o subscriber to THE PUBLIC. 
All lovers of justice are striving 
toward the same end. THE PUB- 
LIC points the way. 
Write your name and address clearly on 
the margin, attach 65 cents, stamps oc 
money order, and with the first number 
of THE PUBLIC we will send you a 
cloth-bound and handsomely printed 
copy of "Tha Crime of Poverty." 

THE PUBLIC 

122 E. 37th St., New York City 



Portland, Or.,' Letter List 



Amundsen, Ben 
Anderson, Albert 
Anderson, C. 
Ahren, Wm. J. 
Backinan, Peter W. 
Bieler. B. 
Bohm, Franz 
Boyle, H. 

Cliristensen, E. H. 
Chrlstensen, H. P. 
Cunningham, G. F. 
])ahl, Louis 
De Long-, K. 
Duret, J. E. 
Ellegaard, M. 
Elliot, Austin A. 
Erickson, John B. 
Guildersen. W. B. 
Geiger, Joe 
Graaf, John D. 
Hanson, August 

-1134 
Harding. Ellis 
Hartman. Fritz 
Hauschlld. B. 
Heino, Gust. 
Hellman. H. "W. 
Henriksen. Geo. 
Herman. David 
Hickey, E. J. 
Hogstrom, Karl I. 
Holmes, George 
Huber, C. L. 
Johansson, Charles 

-2407 
Jorgenson, Earl 
Jensen, H. T. 
Johnson, C. A. 
Jordan, H. S. 
Kase. A. 
Knofsky, B. W. 
Kri.stiansen, Wm. A, 
Laatzen, Hugo 
Larsen, C. J. 



Larsen, Hans 
Larson, C. -1632 
Learch. Paul 
Leskinen. F. 
Matson, Hemming A 
Matson, H. -1808 
Melgant, F. 
Michaels. R. 
Miller. Victor 
Miller, Harry 
Mlkkelsen. Harrj' 
Murphy. Francis Leo 
Newkirk, Clifford 
Nordman, Alek 
Nielsen, Jens 
Nllsen, Chas. 
Nelson, Harry 
Oc-llvie, Wm. A. 
Olilson, J. A. 
Olson, John 
Olson, Chas. 
Paulsson, Herman 
Petersen. Anton 

-lfi75 
Petesen, Knut 
Petter, G. 
Rensmand. Robert 
Ross, Geo. 
Rulsgaard, Roren 
Ruud, Ole H. 
Rytko, Otto 
Samuelsen, S. 
Schmeltning, Max M. 
Schroder, August 
Rchultz. F. E. 
Sibley, Milton 
Slebert, Oust 
.Steenson, Edward 
Swenson, C. E. 
Thoresen, Ingwald 
Tuhkanon. .Tohan J 
Wold. Frank 
Wood, E. E. 




SHARE /ir^/THExVICTOCY 

/save FOR YOVRCOVNTRY '[w«] SAVE FOR YOVRSELF 

/bvy ¥ar^sayings stamps 



l/M', 



Hs^xell Cc-tfirv. 



CARRY ON! 

Uncle Sam is releasing from his service the men who went "over 
there" to free the world from autocracy. Thousands of soldiers are' 
daily receiving their honorable discharges; they pocket their pay, 
bid farewell to their comrades, and sally forth — civilians. 

There is one army, however, which must not be demobilized. 
That is the army of War-Savings Stamp buyers. More recruits are 
needed to carry on the campaign of readjustment which follows 
the signing of the armistice. 

The army of fighters has achieved its purpose. 

The army of savers must remain in "action." 

"Carry on" to a lasting peace under the banner of W. S. S.! 



Johanson, J. A. 
Johnson, J. E. 
Jonasen, J. 
Jones, Erest L. 
Kallio, Frank 
Kind, Herman 
Kolodzieg, George 
Kristoffersen, A. 
Larsen, J. -1542 
Lechemus, Bill 



Thompson, Alex. 

Thompson, Maurice 

Toivonen, F. 

Vlzcarra, Oscar 

Wrigg, F. 

V.'ilhahnson, Karl 
J.Wahi. J. 
B.Yarvinen, V. H. 

Teaman, W. E. 

Zunderer, Heo 



San Pedro Letter List 



Amesen, Frank 
Anderson, P. A. 

-1695 
Anderson. Sven 
Andree, E. A. 
Billington, L A. 
Bergh. B. 
Brandes, W. M. 
Breien, Hans 
Corregsona, Vincent 
Davis, Orvillp 
Deneen, Frank A. 
Edmonds, Jack 
Ellingsen, Wm. 
Enimerz, A., 
Evcnsen, Ed. 
Exlesan, Herman 
Falvlg, .Tnhn 
Fisher, W. -707 
Folke, Harry 
Frank, Paul 
Franzell, A. H. 
Ganser, Joe 
Grassen, Yan 
Gregory, Joe 
Gunderson, B. C. 
Gunnerud Torvakl 
Hansen, Olaf 

Bernard 

John 
Johan 



Hansen. 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Artur 
Hansen, Chas. L. 
Heesho, Henry 
Hill, Fred A. 
Holmes, Frank 
Hubner, Carl F. 
.Tohansen, Cnrl 
.Tohansen, Anton A 
Johnson, Matt 
.Johnson, L. T. -483 
Johannson, N. A. 
.Tohanson, John 
JohanFon, Fritz 



Leisener, A. 
Linden, M. 
LIndholm, Chas. 
Lindstrom, .T A. 
Ljunggren, Albin 
Lonngren, Carl 
Magnusen, Karl 
Malmberg. Ellis 
Martin, George 
Mathis, Hartley 
Matsen, Hemming 
Meyer, Claus 
Monterro. .lohn 
Nelson, Chas. R. 
Nielsen, S. 
Ole, Olesen 
Olin, Emil 
Olsen. Martin 
Osterhaff, Heni'y 
Pedersen, Halver 
Petersen, Hugo 
Raaum. Henry 
Rasmussen, S. A. 
Reith, C. 
Repson, Ed. 
Roed. H. 
Roed, L. A. 
Rosenblad. Billy 
Ross, Wm. 
Samson, T.nuis 
Panders, Chas. 
Schmitd, Louis 
Shpild. Oscnr 
Sindtilom, Ernest W. 
Skogberg. J. 
Pmpbnrg. Olaf F. 
Snarberg. Charles 
Sternberg, Alf. 
Stenroos, A. W. 
Stone, Victor 
Strom, C. L. 
Sturankesken, M. 
.Suominen, Oscar 
Swanson, Ben 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Alfredsen, Adolf Marks, Walter 
Anderson, Harold F.Martenson, Adolp 
Carlstrand Gustaf Martinsson, E. 
Houge, Anton Meyer, Karl 

Kennedy, James ReaNielsen, Alf. W. 
Kennedy, Jas. Rea Nelson, C. W. 

(Package) Olsen, Robert 

Lapauble, Jean Reilley, Ralph 

Pierre Leyfried, M. -2962 

Magail, Michael 



You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stirring times 
In the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship It Is Increasingly dlffleult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

win be specially represented at Wash- 
ington and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La FoUette Is making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people and place 
them whore they belong — on excess 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and Incomes. Because of this he Is be- 
ing attacked more bitterly thJin any 
other m^n in public "'•. 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year — Agents Wanted 

La Fotlette's Magazine, Madison, Wit. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

I am representing the Union men 
who are entitled to salvage and 
members of the crew of the fol- 
lowing vessels. In most cases ac- 
tion has commenced. In some cases 
(he funds have been recovered. In 
others they are readily recoverable 
upon filing power of attorney form 
with me. Address this office by letter. 
"Princeton" vs. "Ardmore,"' $7500 re- 
ceived. "Gulf of Mexico" vs. Bark 
"Portugal," $5000. "Gulf Coast" vs. 
"Boxleaf," settled. "Argonaut" vs. 
"Jason," funds received. "Iroquois" 
vs. "Skinner," settled, crews share 
$12,250. "Brasos" vs. "Iroquois," set- 
tled. "Maine" vs. "Theresa Ac- 
comme.'" "Oskawa" vs. "Westgrove." 
"Buda 2" vs. "Western Star." "St. 
Charles" vs. "Monte Cenis." "Flor- 
ence Olsen" vs. "Marina." Flor- 
ence Olsen" vs. "Claremont." "Alli- 
ance" vs. "Belvcrnon." "Donnelly" 
vs. "Irish." "Anacortes" vs. "S. O. 
Barge No. 95." "Fred W. Wellor" 
vs. "Overbrook." "Neptunas" vs. 
"Panama." "Quincy" vr. "Transpor- 
tation." "Herman Frash" vs. "Bril- 
liant." "O'Neil" vs. "Oregon." Bark 
"Superior." "Pan American" vs. 
"Santa Rita." "St. Charles" vs. 
"Tea." Tug "Navigator" vs. "Edgar 
H. Vance." "Tunica" vs. "Neppon- 
ier." "Lake Charles" vs. "Cantiwo." 
.Silas B. Axtell, 1 Broadway, New 
York City. 8-20-18 



Home Newt 






Attorney General Palmer an- 
nounced that the nation will re- 
main dry under wartime prohibition 
until the treaty of peace is ratified 
and peace formally proclaimed by 
the President. 

Statistics published by the Bureau 
of Immigration show that from 
April 1, 1917, to September 30, 
1918, a total of 178,362 immigrants 
arrived in the United States, while 
123,676 persons left for other coun- 
tries. 

A cold storage bill along the gen- 
eral lines of the New Jersey law 
limiting cold storage to ten months 
and requiring that all cold storage 
articles shall be lalieled, giving the 
date they were stored and with- 
dravvn, has been introduced in the 
House by Representative Hutchin- 
son of New Jersey. 

Reports to the Department of 
Justice from twelve States indicate 
there has been a decline of 10 to IS 
per cent, in food prices since the 
time the fair price committees began 
their work. From four States have 
come reports on wholesale prices in- 
dicating a decline of 2 to 5 per cent. 
Virtually *no reductions in clothing 
prices have been noted. 

The convention of the United 
Mine Workers of America has voted 
down a resolution indorsing the 
League of Nations and calling upon 
the Senate to ratify it without 
amendment. The convention by a 
large majority then voted to table 
the entire subject. The motion to 
table was carried largely on the 
argument that the Peace Treaty had 
become a political issue on which a 
labor convention should not be called 
upon to take action. 

In a letter to Fred McAver of 
Chicago, who called at the White 
House with a delegation which urged 
that orders be issued for the re- 
turn of the drafted, or emergency 
enlisted personnel of the American 
Expeditionary forces in Siberia, 
commanded by Major General 
Graves, the President replied that 
newly enlisted men are being sent 
to Siberia to replace the emergency 
troops, but that it is not the inten- 
tion to withdraw American forces 
from Siberia at this time. 

Leaders of the opposition to the 
Peace Treaty in the United States 
Senate decided at a conference to 
mobilize their forces at once for a 
showdown this week on the Johnson 
amendment giving the United States 
six votes in the League of Nations, 
the same number as the British Em- 
pire. A telegram was dispatched to 
Senator Johnson of California, re- 
calling him from his Western trip to 
lead the fight for the amendment. 
The Senator was asked to return to 
Washington as soon as he speaks at 
St. Paul, Minn. 

In a warning to the Senate again.st 
undue haste in passing the pending 
Oil Land Leasing bill, Senator 
LaFollctte, Republican, Wisconsin, 
said that he would support a measure 
that would provide for Government 
control and operation of the "basic 
things necessary to the life of or- 
ganized society." Senator Walsh, 
Democrat, Montana, read a letter 
from Joseph A. Phclan, oil examiner 
of the Shipping Board, saying that 
the delay of Congress in passing 
the leasing bill "is enriching the 
Standard Oil Company by millions 
of dollars." 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Domestic and Naval 



From the date that British vessel- 
over fifteen years of age -were au- 
thorized to be sold on foreign ac- 
count, to July 29, the number of 
vessels thus disposed of numbered 
15. The British Shipping Controller 
sold 110 steamers to foreign pur- 
chasers this year. 

The steamship "E. C. Pope," 2637 
tons gross, 2064 net, carries about 
4000 tons deadweight, built by the 
Detroit Dry Dock & Shipbuilding 
Co., Wyandotte, Mich., in 1891, and 
owned by the U. S. Shipping Board, 
is reported sold to the Coastwise 
Transportation Co., Boston. 

Following the bid of 2.50c per 
pound for 30,000 tons of plates made 
by the Carnegie Company to the 
Navy Department, shipbuilders have 
been asking for concessions in 
prices, but it is highly improbable 
that the steel mills will roll plates 
for commercial interests at as low 
a price as the Carnegie Company 
quoted to the Navy. In fact, in- 
dependent plate mills did not offer 
to roll plates even for the Gov- 
ernment under 2.65c, base Pittsburgh. 

Sharp reductions in freight rates 
from Atlantic and Gulf jjorts to 
Montevideo and Buenos Aires have 
been announced by the Shipping 
Board. New rates include: Steel, 
$18 a ton, a cut of $2; barbed wire 
and asphalt, $20, a cut of $2.50; agri- 
culturals, automobiles, lubricating 
oils, machinery, wax, glucose, bur- 
laps, $20 a ton, cut of $5. Rice is 
cut from $30 to $20 and. rosin from 
$40 to $30. Cement rates are re- 
duced $2 a ton, making a total re- 
duction of $9 since July 15. 

Advices from Bluefields, Nicaragua, 
state that a war is now going on 
between the new Nicaraguan Fruit 
and Steamship Company and the 
Bluefields Fruit and Steamship Com- 
pany. The former, on account of the 
attempt of the latter to boycott it, 
has refused to deliver bananas to 
the latter pending arrival of its own 
steamships as it did formerly and 
several thousand bunches have been 
allowed to spoil. The Nicaragua 
Fruit and Steamship Co., which is 
a new concern, has been making 
rapid inroads into the business of 
the older concern, and the latter is 
taking every possible means to re- 
tain its position. 

An interesting little motor vessel 
has recently been completed by the 
Tank Shipbuilding Corporation, at its 
shipyard in Newburgh, N. Y., to 
the order of the Vacuum Oil Co., 
of New York. This vessel which 
is named the "Bayonne" is an oil 
tanker built on the Isherwood system 
to Lloyd's highest class on the fol- 
lowing dimensions: Length over 
all, 216.7 feet, between perpendiculars, 
208 feet; beam molded, 35.6 feet; 
depth molded, 17.4 feet; deadweight, 
1750 tons; block coeiificient, 0.765; 
draft loaded, 15.3 feet; cargo ca- 
pacity, 528,900 gallons; main engines, 
500 b.h.p. All auxiliaries, except the 
air compressor, are operated by 
steam generated by a Scotch boiler 
located on the upper deck and fitted 
with a White mechanical oil fuel 
burner. The main engfhe is a six- 
cylinder Mcintosh & Seymour Diesel 
which on trial gave a mechanical 
efficiency of 78%, the fuel con- 
sumption being 0.418 pounds per 
b.h.p. hour of oil at 24° Baume. 
Allowing for tidal corrections, the 
speed developed was 11.2 knots in 
still water at 185 r.p.m. 



Aberg. filnar 
Adams, Arch 
Adamson, HJ. 
Adanisson, John 
Ab'uilar, All'. 
Aimer, Robert 
Akerman, V. 
Alto, H. 
Alto, W. 
.'Vndersen, Adolf 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, CaL 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH. Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30, 1919. 

Assets $60,509,192.14 

Deposits 57,122,180.22 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,387,011.92 

Employees' Pension Fund 306,852.44 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

QF-O. TOURNY, Vice-Prea. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vlce-Pres. and Ca«hler 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary 
WM. D. NEWHOUSB, Assistant Secretary 
GOODFELLOW, EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, 
General Attorneys 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

GEO TOURNY L N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E T KRUSB HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 

E. A. CHRISTENSON L. S. SHERMAN 



San Francisco Letter List 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver, Business Manager, The 
Seamen's Journal, 59 Clay Street, San 
Francisco, Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destinition. 



Andersson, C. -797 
Anderson. John A. 
Anderson, John F. 
Anderson, Edw. 
Andersson, Chaheles 
Andersson, O. L. 
Andersson, C. -2185 
^iigelbacic. Geo. 
Ardt, Anton 
Aro, Kalle 



Andersen, F. -14" Aslc. E. A. 
Andersen, N. -197».A.uKustine Anth. 
Andarsson, A. O. Austed, Barney 



Balco, Juan 
Baumont, H. 
Benson. S. -986 
Bentuso Manl. 
Billington Martin 
Rjuik\ist, Ragn 
Bjorica, Hans K. 
Ujorklund, G. 
Bjorn, Kristian 
Bleasing, W. 
Blomgren, C. A. 
Bode, Wilhelm 

Cameron, James 
Case, Ralf E. 
Carlsen, Julius 
Carlson, Andrew 
Carlson. E. R 



Borjesen, L. 
Bosshard, Henry 
Brady, B. 
Brain, Louis 
Browne. Chas. B. 
Bruuln, E. -2583 
Brvaiit, J. S. 
Bugel, J. 
Bunting, A. 
Byars, Terry 
Bye. K. 
Bye, Alf. 

Christenson. Einar 
Clark, Chas. R. 
Clausen, Louis 
Collins, Franlc 
Conigan R. B. 



i::iilsnn, K. S. .1769Conrad, P. W. 
Carroll, James Cordey. Allan 

Catechli. Li. Correro. T. R. 

Christensen, H. C. Cox, R. H. 
Chrlstensen, R. H. Crowley, Fred 



Didrilcsen, Martin 
Driscoli, John 
Douglas, W. F. 
Drysdale, H. 
Dumas, Clifford 
Dumas, J. 
Dunham, Chas. 
Dunkel, E. 



Dahler, H. N. 
Dahlstrom, Sven 
Danielsen, Henry 
Danlelson, Harry 
Daskeland, N. N. 
Davis, Warren 
Dawson, Herebrt 
Delahanty, J. J. 
Devenay, Ed. 

Edler, Fritz 
Edwards, Ole 
lOsenas, Nils 
Ehlers, Heinle 
Eide, J. -962 
lOUiot. Pietro 
Einard, J. 
Elnartsen, Hans 
Klo, Franic 

Fagerly, O. 
Falbom, Albin 
Felsch, C. ■ 
Fernandez, G. L. 
Flgved, Sigurd 
Fltsburg, Gordon 
Flinkenberg, F. 
Fjellman, Geo. 

Gailunas, Anton 

Gans, Frans 

Ga.sck, Willy 

Gibson, C. R. 

Goodmans, G. 

Greenfield, J. Wm. M. -1123 

Gronroos, John 



Engstrom, Ben 
Engelbregtsen, C. 
Erbe, Lewis 
Erlkson, A. -571 
Erikson, Chas. 
Esplund, Fred 
Essen. C. A. 
Evenson, A. 
Evensen, Martin 

Forslund, Fred 
Foss, L. 
Frizzell, R. L. 
Fredriksen. Herman 
Frizzellc. .Tack 
Frost, Peter 
Fuller, Geo. 



Gronroos, Elbin 
Gullaksen, Hans 
Grussman, G. A. 
Gundersen, Andreas 
Gutmann, Paul C. 



Haak, R. 
H.nkala, J. 
Hakala, Paavo 
Hakala, Paul 
Halley, W. 
Halvorsen, Chris. 
Halvorsen, Torlelf 
Hamilton. W. G. 
Hammer, Carl 
Hammerqulst, A. 
Hamren, T. G. 
Hannpllus, R. F. 
Hanschman, W. 
Hannesen, K. J. 
Hansen, Hans P. 
Hansen, Oskar 
Hansen, R. C. A. 
Hansen, Kristen 
Hansen, H. M. 
Hansen, R. 
Hanson, Frank 



Hanson, Carl 
Heaps, James 
Heldon, Harry 
Heldahl, T. 
Henrilcson, J. L. M. 
Henriksson, W. 
Hermansson, Frits 
Henzengo, Cornello 
Hewell, 
Hicks. Jim 
HUH. Albert 
Hingren, J. HJ. 
Hjerllng, Hj. 
Holmgren. G. J. 
Holland, D. 
Holllngsworth, W. C. 
Horner, A. 
Hunter, G. H. 
Hugo. O. -1934 
Hubertz, Emll 
Hy, Ben 



Ingebretsen, Alf. Iversen, Iver 



Jacoljson, Jacob 
Jaderholm, Hans 
Jakullis, Johann 
Janson. C. J. W. 
Jansson, K. H. 



Johnsen, Norman 
Joliansen, A. -2183 
Johnsen, Walther 
Johansson, Nath. 
Johnston, Leslie 



Jensen, E. A. 
Jensen, J. P. 
Jeppesen, Lars 
lessen, Carl 
Icrnljerg, A. 

Kaholemoku, W. 
Kane, John 
Karhu. Veda 
Karlgron, Gust 
Kennedy, J. R. 
iCinamon, Jack 
Klnghorn, Frank 
Kittelsen, Karl 



Jonsson, Erik • 
Jorgensen, Johannes 
Jorgensen, Ole E. 
Jorgensen. Jorgen 

Kiyanno, F. W. E. 
Knudsen, Kangvald 
Koiuin, Oscar 
Koolstra. S. 
Krlslensen, A. -1095 
Krohn, Harry 
Knox, David 
Kullbom, Oscar 



Lagerberg, Chas. Lefter, John A. 
Lalne, J. E. I.fwis. Wm. 

I>amberg, Herman Liesen, Wm. 
Lambert, S. I. Lindgross, L. H. 

Landburg, ilerman Lolgren, R. 
Landregan, J. W. Loland, Louis 
l.atigwortliy, E. C. Lonnqvist, Jolin 
Larsen, Flngl. Loughrey, C. VV. 

Larsen. Kaare Lundberg. Oskar 

Larsen, J. H. -22S0Lyngard, Geo. 
Larsen, K. -1660 



MacGregor, Donald 
Mahler, Hans 
Mahoney, F. J. 
Maldonado, A. 
Marshall, I. S. 
.Martins, Jose 
Martin, John 
Mathis. H. 
McManus, P. 
-Meek, O. J. 
Mettson, Carl 

Nagel, A. 
Nagle, Chris. 
.Neiiidorft. F. R. 
Nelsen, Rangvald 
Nelson, Fred 
Nelson, Waldemar 
-Nelson. John, -1013 
Nelson, A. W. 
Nlss, Alisel 
Nickolsen, L. 
Nicolaisen, S. 
Nielsen, Villy 
Nielsen, Carl C. 

Olafson, O. B. 
Olsen, H. -1314 
tMsen, Marinus 
Olsen, Oskar 
Olsen, Jens 
Olson. E. A. 

Parson, Herman 
I^etersen, H. A. 
Pedersen, Peter B. 
I'endlebury, Tom 
i'ersson, Edw. 
Persson, O. W. 
I'erselli, Geo. 
I'clcrs, J. M. 
I'etcrson, Jennings 
Peterson, M. 
Petersen, O. -1595 

Rantanen, F. 
Hasmussen, E. V. 
Itasmussen, Emil 
Kenrall, A. 
Richardson, J. W. 
Riciiardson, E. A. 
Kickhoff, W. 
Riddell, Allan 
Rlesbeck, HJ. 



Meza, Leonardo 
Mikkelsen, Olaf 
Miller, F. A. 
Miller, William 
Mlttemeyer, Y. F. 
Moe, K. 
Monson, M. O. 
Moore, Thos. 
Moren, E. H. 
Morrison, Pliillip 

Nielsen, C. -1303 
Nielsen, P. L. 
Nielsen, Willy 
Nielsen, C. -1314 
Nilsen, Edon 
Nlllsen, Jens 
Nilsson, S. H. H. 
Noonan, J. 
NordenlJerg, Alfred 
Nordstrom, Bror 
Nunes, C. C. 
Nyland, A. M. J. 

Olsson, Axel 
Olsson. C. O. 
Orzednowsky, Leo 
Oseberg. Ansgar 
Osth, T. 
Owens, Wm. 

Peterson, L. -1389 
Pettibone, G. W. 
Pettersen, Higbert 
Pihlstroni, R. J. 
Pilkinton. Homer 
Pinkhurst, C. B. 
Porter, R. 
Preen, P. A. van 
Prinz. Carl 
Prun, John 
Puiver, W. F. 



Ringman, C 
Roach, S. 
Rohman, Geo. 
Ronning, H. 
Rosa, John 
Ross, Geo. 
Rosen, V. 
Rundell, W. 
Ryan, Patrick 



W. 



."^aalma. .Toseph 
Sahlin, Nils 
Sandblom, K. 
Sanne, R. 
Schlachte, Alf. 
Scott, B. F. 
Seiffert, John 
Shannon, J. 
Slgrist, Geo. 
.Siinonsen, SIgvard 
Sjolander, J. B. 
Sinedsvig, O. B. 
Smith, T. J. 
Solvin, Oscar E. 

Taival, Alf. 
Tamisar, P. 
Tammi, J. E. 
Tandberg, Einar 
Telli-fsen, Emil 
Tergersen, Tom 
Thom, Ed. 
Thomas, Frank 



Sparling, James 
Stange. A. -2063 
Steen, Ivar 
Stenssloff, E. 
Sirasdln, H. 
Strandberg. Elof 
Stranberg, P. 
Stratten, Harry 
Sundberg, F. F. 
Sundburg, C. 
.Svensen. Anker 
Swanson, Oscar 
Swanson, S. 
Sweeney, D. 

Thompsen. Jack 
Thompson, C. 
Tonniiig, Chris. 
Torjusscn,- J. I. -1028 
Tlbbitts, P. 
Toffrl, A. 
Torrance, John 
Tyrrell, James 



Van Fleet, F. B. 
Van Reen, T. R. 
Vander, Klift J. 



Venquirst, E. 
A. Victor, J. 
J. Vihavainen, Geo. 



Wallenstrand Wlckstrom, J. A. 

Weelen, Theodorus 'Wikstrom, W. 

Wehtje, AV. H. Wikman, D. 

Wpijola. Arturi Wilhelm, E. 

Woinberg, Krlss Williams. Charley 

Westerlund, Albert Woods, E. J. -714 

VVickstrom. Axel Wreiljan, Joseph 



PACKAGES. 



Benson, Fred 
Kgan, John 
Flood, Alex. 
Goodmans, G. 
Gunderson, Ole 
Hlgliland, D. 
Irniey, b^ed 
Jewett, Chaa. 
Johansen, S. R. 



Johaneson, K. 
Long. C. 
MacDonnell, W. 
Mayes, J. B. 
Monroe. A. J. 
Olsen, H. 
Olsen, Ole 
Olaon, Knut 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Ingwald Johnson and Charles Mol- 
ler, members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Chehalis," on January 29, 1919, when 
Otto Peterson was injured, kindly 
report to the Secretary, Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal. 



Charles L. Carlsen, No. 1834, who 
disappeared from the barge "Isaac 
Reed" at Eureka, California, on De- 
cember 31, 1918, is inquired for by 
his wife, Mrs. C. L. Carlsen, 107 
Courtland Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



Oscar Aberg, a native of Sweden, 
age 25 years, last heard of in New- 
port News, Va., March, 1917. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts will 
please notify his sister, Mrs. Gurli 
I.andec, Box 166, Millburn, N. J. 

3-26-19 



Members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Argonaut," who assisted in the sal- 
vage services to the S. S. "Jason," at 
the time she was in distress oflF the 
coast of Florida, on or about Janu- 
ary 1st, 1918, will kindly call or 
communicate with the undersigned 
who is representing most of the offi- 
cers and crew of the S. S. "Argo- 
naut." Silas B. Axtell, One Broad- 
way, New York City. 

Phone Kearny 5361 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 

Opposite Southern Pacific BIdg. 

60 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 
Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Walt, by the Latest Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
(WE USE ONLY THK BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 



CHRISTENSEN 'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Established 1906 

CAPT. C. EHLERS, Superintendent 
257 Hansford Bldg 
268 Market Street 

The pupils of this well known school 
are taught all up-to-date requirements 
for passing a successful examination 
before the United States Steamboat 
Inspection Service. 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Kearny 5132 

East Street Tailors 

GENERAL OUTFITTER 

Altering done at moderate prices 

209 East Street, nr. Washington 

San Francisco 

H. LEVERIDGE 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 to 50 cents per day, 
Dr $2 to $3.00 per weel?, with all mod- 
ern conveniences. Free Hot and Cold 
Shower Baths on every floor. Elevator 
Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfleld 24S7 

HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTEN8EN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 775* 

Res., Randolph 27 
Office Hours. 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:80 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to l p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 



DENTIST 



No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

QNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices. :: :: Union Made Goods Only. 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



LOOK 

For the Name and the Number 

GEO. A. PRICE 

19 East Street, San Francisco 



U. S. Navy Tower's 

Sea Boots Flannels Oil Skins 

SEAMEN— OUTFITTER— FISHERMEN 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 
Uniforms, Caps, Hatt, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Missior 



Jortall 


Bros. 


Express 


Stand 


and Baggage Room 




— at — 




212 EAST ST., San 


Francisco 


Ph( 


3ne Douglas 


5348 



Reliable Tailor 

Up-to-date Cloths at Popular 
Prices. All work guaranteed. 

TOM WILLIAMS 

28 SACRAMENTO STREET 

Near Market 

Special Inducements to Seafaring Trade 

SUITS STEAM PRESSED, 50 Cts. 

The only way; no burning; of 
garments. 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 



716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 



UNION MADE 
IN OUR OWN SHOP 

Represented by 

E. PEGUILLAN 




SUITS AND 
OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 
Prices 




"What Shall 



ARE YOUR LIBERTY BONDS SAFE 

Bring or send them for safekeeping to this Savings 
and Commercial Bank and open a 

LIBERTY BONDS SAVINGS ACCOUNT 
We will take care of your Liberty Bonds for you 
free of charge. Our folder 

lln U/ith Them" explains this service in detail. 
UU ntlll IIIClll Please ask for a copy to-day. 



Anglo-California Trust Company Bank 

"THE PERSONAL SERVICE BANK" 

Market and Sansome Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

Sixteenth and Mission Streets Third and Twentieth Streets 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO SEAFARING MEN 



UTTMARK'S NAUTICAL ACADEMY 

(Established 18S2) 
CAPTAIN F. E. UTTMARK, Principal 



8 State Street 
New York, N. Y. 



30 India Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR MASTERS', MATES' AND 
PILOTS' EXAMINATION 

Our ACADEMY is recognized as the oldest and best equipped NAVIGATION 

SCHOOL in the United States and is up to date in every respect. For 

full information call at school or write. Catalog sent free on request. 

"UTTMARK'S FOR NAVIGATION" 




Named Shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impregsion of thia 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuae for abaence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
Collis Lovely, Gen. Pres. Cbaa. L. Baine, Sec.-Treaa. 




Ask for this Label 
on Beer 



INT'L UNION OF 
UNITED BREWERY and 
SOFT DRINK WORKERS 

OF AMERICA 
Asks you to write and speak to your 






DrlnK 




Ask for this Label 
on Soft Drinks 



STATE ASSEMBLYMEN AND STATE SENATORS 

TO 

WORK AND VOTE 

Against the Ratification of the National Prohibition Amendment 
to the Constitution 




JACOB PETERSEN 4 SON 
Proprietor* 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
SAN FRANCItCO 



Newt from Abroad 



The amount of American capital in- 
vested in the Philippine Islands is 
variously estimated at from $75,000,- 
000 to $100,000,000. 

Porto Rico has thirteen banks for 
95,769 persons. Hawaii has one bank 
for each 12,105 persons, and the 
Philippines one bank for each 1,000,- 
000 persons. 

During 1918 the United States im- 
ported from Manchuria soy-bean oil 
amounting to 257,863,427 pounds, 
valued at $36,496,061, as against 
198,534,626 pounds, valued at $19,- 
740,640 in 1917. 

The total value of the product 
manufactured and disposed of in 
Jajian for the fiscal year ended 
March, 1919, was $65,249,793. The 
consumpton of tobacco in that coun- 
try has been increasing greatly each 
year. 

Five million Germans have filed 
with the Central Bureau of Immigra- 
tion applications for permission to 
leave the country. The majority of 
these are turning their eyes toward 
.South America. A large number also 
have indicated their desire to settle 
in Palestine 

A French decree has been issued 
establishing a permanent Supreme 
Council for Sea Fisheries coinposed 
of the president of the Merchant 
Marine Committee of the Chamber 
of Deputies, the presidents of the 
Maritime and Naval Leagues, ship- 
builders and owners of fishing ves- 
sels, etc. 

The will of Andrew Carnegie dis- 
poses of an estate estimated at be- 
tween $25,000,000 and $30,000,000. 
The residuary estate of about $20,- 
000,000 goes to the Carnegie Cor- 
poration. Direct public bequests of 
$960,000 are left to institutions, and 
annuities which will take $268,000 a 
year go to friends, associates, rela- 
tives, and persons of public promi- 
nence. 

A dispatch Irom Helsingfors says 
the Russian Soviet Government has 
nationalized the estate of the late 
Count Tolstoy, in order to preserve 
the memory of Tolstoy. The dispatch 
adds that the Government has invited 
the members of the Tolstoy family to 
enter the service of the Government 
and reside iti the castle and manage 
a projected institution for the en- 
lightenment of the people. 

Three million, four hundred and 
si.x thousand persons pay an income 
tax in Great Britain, according to 
an official government report. One 
hundred and forty-eight persons have 
incomes of $486,666 per year and 
over. Two million, one hundred and 
sixty-three thousand received in- 
comes of $1216 and under. Incomes 
of less than $779 per annum were 
reported by 2,490,000 persons. Of 
these 1,590,000 were relieved of taxa- 
tion by allowances. 

The report of the Java-China- 
Japan line for the twelve months 
ending December 31 last, shows that 
after providing for interest, de- 
preciation, etc., the year's working 
has resulted in a profit of 3,348,705 
florins, against 4,016,666 florins in 
the previous year, enabling the di- 
rectors to recommend the payment 
of a dividend of 30 per cent., as 
compared with 20 per cent, for 
1917, and the transfer of 302,425 
florins to reserve, against 166,667 
florins, leaving, after the payment 
of bonuses and taxes, a balance of 
10,848 florins to carry forward. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wit. 



Recipe for Trouble. — I-et Cupid 
take a spoon and stir iip something. 
— Jacksonville Times-Union. 



Generally speaking, an after-the- 
war garden looks as if it had been 
tlirough one. — Kansas City Star. 



Pessimist — 1 have only one friend 
on earth — my dog. Optimist — Why 
don't you get another dog? — Life. 



"The cook says she is going to 
take a two weeks' vacation, John." 
"Gee, I wish we could afford to!" — 
Life. 



Smithson — I want to sweep the 
cobwebs from my brain. Wilson — 
Why not use a vacuum cleaner? — 
New York Evening Post. 



"My hair is coming out dread- 
fully. Do you know of any way to 
prevent it?" "No; you ought to 
have thought of that before you got 
married." — Baltimore American. 



"Why do they call Broadway 'The 
Great White Way'?" asked the visi- 
tor. "Because," answered the New 
Yorker, "the thoroughfare is dedi- 
cated to ice-cream soda and butter- 
milk." — Washington Star. 



Billy Sunday delights to tell of 
the subtle criticism administered 
him by a Philadelphia girl for his 
informal method of preaching. The 
revivalist halted at the end of an 
impassioned harangue, rolled down 
his sleeves, put on his coat, and 
said: "And now, dear friends, docs 
any one want to ask any questions?" 
All of the congregation were silent 
except the pretty girl in the front 
row. Siie said: "May 1 smoke?" 



A comma is a little thing, but so 
is a cinder in your eye. In the 
wrong place, little things can cause 
a great deal of trouble. A certain 
poor woman, whose husband was 
going to sea, handed through the 
clerk to the minister this notice, 
which she desired him to read in 
church: "A man going to sea, his 
wife desires the prayers of the con- 
gregation." The minister, punctuat- 
ing it in his own way, read it thus — 
to the obvious amusement of his 
flock: "A man going to see his wife, 
desires the prayers of the congre- 
gation." 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 



1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Children's Accounts 

Your children should be tauglit to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe in a savings account. 

They cannot start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man aa a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




HORACE R. TAYLOR 



HENRY TAYLOR 



TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

510 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

IMPORTERS OF NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

LORD KELVIN'S and WHYTE THOMSON'S 
Compasses, Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sound- 
ing Machines, Sextants, Parallel Rulers, Pelorus Di- 
viders and Nautical Books of Every description. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 
1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 



J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

11 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When Yeu Buy 
from U«, Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash. 



Diamonds 
Watches 



Phon* DouQla* 1761 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Size 




SOLID GOLD $1.50 
GOLD FILLED .50 



64 MARKET STREET 



High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

SEAMEN" When in Port- BE SURE 

You see the most complete line of 

UNION LABEL SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS IN THE U. S. A. 

Sold Direct to You at Manufacturer's Prices 



EAGLESON S CO. 



1118 Market St. 
San Francisco 
717 K St., near Postoffice 

Sacramento 
112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 



Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Silverware 

SowmmCa 




715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

Big Stock — Everything Marked in Plain Figures 
__^ THE ONE-PRICE JEWELRY STORE 

QamesJi.Sorensm ^INE WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 

i^j^an^ Jftau At the Big Red Clock and the Chimes. 




Market at Fifth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 

Clothing and Gents* 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes. Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend, San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN! 
You Know Ma 




I am 
"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 

at the right prices. I'll try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats too. 
If you want your Panama blocked 

right, I'll do that. 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



BCD SEAL CKAB CO., liANUrAaUKCtS 

133 FIRST STREET, 8. F. 
Phone Douglas 1M0 



OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE ^ 

kONAUTSim 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: 


Justice by Organization 


\OL. XXXIir, No. 4. SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1919. 




Whole No. 2558. 



SEAMEN AND THE COURTS 



The Curious Attitude of Federal Judges on the Seamen's Act 



T!ie Journal has often complained about 
the antediluvian mental attitude of Federal 
Judges toward progressive legislation. 

When a real, worth-while labor law is 
finally enacted by Congress, after years 
and years of delay, only half the battle 
is won. Reactionary employers will insist 
upon carrying every disputed point to the 
highest court in the land and since the 
great majority of Federal Judges are gov- 
erned wholly and solely by Middle Age 
precedents Labor's struggle in the courts 
is always disheartening. 

Some of the Seamen's particular griev- 
ances in this respect have just been pub- 
lished in the New Republic. Messrs. Rob- 
ert W. Bruere and Heber Blankenhorn 
are authors of the article, which is re- 
printed in part herewith, and they have 
surely succeeded in presenting a clear 
and lucid case for the Seamen. 



.Seamen feel tjiat the Seamen's law, their 
Magna Charta, is being whittled away by the 
courts, particularly by narrow majority decis- 
ions of the United States Supreme Court. 
American seamen have always felt cut off from 
law and justice. They are not voters. Seamen 
of other countries, such as England and Den- 
mark, vote, casting their ballots by proxy. 
American seagoing citizens feel like aliens be- 
fore judges who live on land the same as ship 
owners. 

First was the Chclentis case. Chelentis, a 
fireman, was ordered to dump ashes over the 
windward side of a ship in a gale. He asked 
for a helper, was refused and had to attempt 
the job alone. It cost him a leg. In the past, 
injured seamen could not receive damages be- 
cause of the "fellow servant" rule. The "fellow 
servant" rule harks back to the early days of 
railroading, when it was applied to protect 
property owners after a brakeman who had been 
knocked off his perch when the train hit a cow 
sued the company. The court held that the 
engineer who shouldn't have hit the cow, was 
negligent and was responsible because he was 
a fellow servant of the brakeman and that 
companies couldn't be sued for fellow servants' 
negligence. On land, the workmen's compensa- 
tion laws in many States have put an end to 
such rulings. The LaFollette law specifically 
provides that "seamen having command shall 
not be held to be fellow servants." But the 
Supreme Court decided, despite dissenting opin- 
ions, that the fellow servant bar still holds. 
Chelentis and other one-legged seamen there- 
fore recover nothing. 

.Second was the "Nigretia" case. Four Arab 
sailors finding that their ship was carting them 
round the world and never touching their native 



port, quit it in New York and sued for their 
pay. Sailors are notoriously penniless. An 
auxiliary act to the Seamen's law provides that 
"courts of the United States shall be open to 
seamen without furnishing bonds or pre-pay- 
ment of costs." Tiie Supreme Court, a.gain with 
dissenting opinions, held that "courts" meant 
only "courts of first instance" and that if the 
sailor wanted to appeal he'd have to pay first. 
All the ship owner needed to do was to appeal 
and the sailor's chance of damages was gone. 
Since then a congressional rider has put a stop 
to the possibility, but seamen believe that the 
Supreme Court tried to kill that section of 
their law. 

Third, tlie "Rh.ine-VVindrush" and "Talus ' cases; 
tlie Supreme Court, 5 to 4, decided that another 
protective section of the law meant nothing. 
This section aimed a blow at the infamous 
practice of "advance" and the bondage of the 
"crimp." From time immemorial masters have 
held the seaman slave to the ship by keeping 
his pay from him; in this the master's ally is 
the "crimp," or boarding master. The sailor 
can get no job except through the crimp and 
at the cost of one to three months wages paid 
as "advance," which is split between master and 
crimp, while the seaman is held to the ship to 
"earn" it. Under this practiced the seaman never 
can "earn" enough to enable him to leave the 
vessel and keep alive ashore while hunting a 
better shiji. The Seamen's law's great aim is 
to equalize American and forei,gn ship wages 
by making the sailor free to desert the low 
paid ship. To accomplish this the law pro- 
hibits "advance" and puts teeth in the ban by 
providing for civil suit for half the wages 
earned, from which no "advance" can be de- 
ducted. 

And the Supreme Court has decided, 5 to 4, 
that the "advance" prohibition which had al- 
ready abolished crimping from American coast- 
wise trade, does not apply to foreign ports; 
Justice Day's majority decision is that Congress 
failed to express intention because the words 
"in foreign ports" were not specifically in this 
section. Justice M'Kenna's minority opinion, 
concurred in by Justices Clarke, Brandeis and 
Holmes, has no doubt of the intention. The 
majority ojiinion, establishing the policy of the 
I'nited .'^tates. with thousands of seamen watchin.g 
to see that the law vital to them is enforced, 
comes to this statement: "Had Congress in- 
tended to make void such contracts and payments 
a few words would have stated that intention, 
not leaving such an important regulation to be 
gathered from implication." The minority oi)in- 
ion sees no necessity for holding up the opera- 
tion of a Magna Charta until such time as Con- 
gress can insert in one section of it tiiree 
words and savs: "The act applies to foreign 
vessels as explicitly and as circumstantially as it 
does to domestic vessels. ... It gives the 
right to a seaman on a foreign vessel to de- 
mand from the master one-half part of the wages 
which he shall have earned at every port and 
makes void all stipulations to the contrary. . . . 
The defense of an advance payment is pre- 
cluded and clearance of the foreign vessel is 



forbidden. And thus the act has completeness 
of right and remedy and we think precludes 
judicial limitation of either. Its provisions are 
simple and direct, there is no confusion in their 
command, no difficulty in their obedience." 

The Supreme Court is still being eyed nar- 
rowly by seamen for the ruling set up in the 
X'cllman case coming before it shortly. In this 
Judge Dickinson, and, later, the Third Circuit 
Court, have struck the hardest blow of all at 
the Seamen's law by deciding that the section 
providing for suit for half wages means that 
half a seamen's wages must always remain in 
the master's hand until, the whole voyage is 
over. With the "Talus" decision this means that 
foreign ship owners need only make sure that 
their sailors have been paid half their wages in 
order to make it impossible for those sailors, 
to ask for any of the remaining half when in 
an American port. It means a direct blow at 
tlie wage-equalizing effect of the law. It plays 
directly into the hands of foreign ship owners, 
into the hands of the old covert combination 
of American aiid foreign capital which has kept 
the American flag off the seas for fifty years. 
. Finally, Judge Hough of the Circuit Court, 
under this law which was meant to encourage 
desertion, has held that a seaman expressing 
intention or desire to leave the ship, before ex- 
pressing his request for half wages, is a "de- 
serter," and not entitled to half wages. As 
tile seamen explain it, this means: "If I say, 
'I'm going to quit this rotten ship, T demand 
half my wages,' f get nothing; but if I say, 
'I demand half my wages, I'm going to quit,' 
I get my wages." 

The last straw is this decision, in the Bel- 
gier case: the sailor is a deserter, entitled to 
no half-wages if he expresses dissatisfaction 
with the ship indicating desire to leave it, while 
at sea. If the buffeted sailor is overheard to re- 
niark in his fetid foc'sle. "This is a rotten ship- 
I'm tlirough," tliat bars him from his pay weeks 
later when he gets to port and asks half wages. 

The sailor is a simple man; doubtless it is 
simple prejudice on his part to regard all this 
word-whetting as the work of men who happen 
to he judges but who dress like ship owners 
and live on land like ship owners, while he goes 
hack to the old sea bondage created by ship 
owners, American aiid foreign, with the help of 
jud.ges in many lands. 

The null of the question of an .'\merican 
merchant marine, say the seamen, is this: you 
cannot have American sea power without Amer- 
ican labor and American labor is not going 
down to the sea in ships except as organized 
labor. That is the moral of all the argument 
about preference for American citizens and for 
union labor during tlie strike. American sca- 
lalxir cracking yarns with organized seamen in 
foreign ports, swapping oaths with striking labor 
in American ports, is just as "unrestful" in its 
itch for a unionized industry as is land labor 
tin- world over. The itch is in the rank and 
file; the big strike started against the wishes 
of union leaders when firemen and sailors began 
quitting without authorization. Tlic ur.ge is in 
seamen without respect to nation: Dutchmen, 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Britisli anil Scandinavians quit their flags as 
llieir ships made American ports during the 
strike, left the decks without "authorization" or 
formulated demands simply because they heard 
Yankee sailors were out. American seamen 
urged them to go back lest the strikers be ac- 
cused of interfering with the transport home of 
American troops. The foreigners' walkout was 
symptomatic of a fast growing international soli- 
darity of sea workers, competitors in skill, but 
co-operators for recognition of organized rights. 
Granted that recognition and the topic you 
hear from every union leader on our seaboard 
is "cooperation and the American merchant ma- 
rine the biggest and best on the water." 

Hear a leader of the marine engineers' or- 
ganization, whose generalship solidified the 
strike, talking to his men on what the victory 
meant: 

"You men now have a tremendous job; 
you've got to become the best engineers in the 
world. Your ranks have filled up in the war. 
emergency with a lot of half-baked 'engi- 
neers' who waste coal and oil and don't 
know your engines. You've got to get every 
pound out of coal, save oil and better the ma- 
chinery. You can't grouse that it's saving for 
the ship owners; it's for the American merchant 
marine. The only way this country is going 
to keep the flag on all oceans is by greater 
efficiency, the finest management. You've got to 
take part of the managing responsibility." 

Hear a leader on democratic co-operation: 
"The old law of the sea was fear: Tf you don't 
obey that order, you're a mutineer; T'U put 
you in irons.' The fear was especially strong 
across the class line. Foreign ships' officers 
are largely drawn from one class, their crews 
from another. We want the officers in Ameri- 
can bottoms to come from the same class, go- 
ing to sea as bright boys and training up to 
officers, with no class line to bar. Those offi- 
cers are best who understand the seamen, hav- 
ing been one of them, and so can get the only 
true co-operation. The basis of that great 
efficiency we're after is democracy." 

The co-operating seafaring unions, then, rec- 
ognize that their organized power means not 
only demands for rights but responsibility. As 
to their ability to take the responsibility sea- 
men's journals point to Italy. There the Na- 
tional Federation of Seamen, which has been 
called "without doubt the most advanced and 
highlj- developed industrial organization in the 
world," embracing every class of worker from 
captain to cabin boy, began during the war to 
operate ships for the Italian government. It 
is allied with the co-operative dockers and the 
co-operative shipyards, such as that at Genoa, 
where war building and repairing was done 
under union management to the complete satis- 
faction of Allied admirals. Now the Federated 
Seamen, asking that more ships be turned over 
to them, not to own but to operate, declare 
themselves ready to assume responsibility for 
the control and management of the whole of 
Italian shipping in the triple interest of the 
nation, the seamen and the industry. 

Rivalry will not die out of the sea, no more 
than salt. No lookout sights rival-flagged masts 
but his shipmates feel like working rope or coal 
or oil to beat the foreigners. Will American sea 
workers, on deck, on bridge, in galley, in engine 
room, labor together to beat the foreign ship, 
run by the seamen for the seamen and his na- 
tion? American seamen say "Aye, aye," but not 
on the old conditions. 

ROBERT W. BRUERE. 
HEBER BLANKENHORN. 



WALL STREET CRIMES. 



Everybody knows that the doings of Wall 
Street are responsible for the ills of the 
world, for has not everybody agreed that it 
is the home of the money devil, and as 
"money is the root of all evil," what more 
need be said to fix the responsibility? 

It would take more than the usual argu- 
ment to convince the majority of the people 
of this country that the doings of the finan- 
ciers are not to blame for everything that 
we find to our disadvantage, and while we 
believe that there are well-intentioned men 
to be found there regulating the financial 
affairs of the country, public opinion holds 
that it would take a mighty fine-toothed comb 
to locate them. Public opinion, while not 
always fair or correct, usually is not changed 
without sufficient reason.- 

It is expected that outsiders will hammer 
away at the "system" and find all the fault 
with it that is really needed, but it is not 
expected that "insiders" will regard the situ- 
ation, in spots, as so rotten as to call for 



criticism, which is exactly what happened, 
when on .Vugust 1, 1010, the Wall Street 
Journal had this to say of the Crimes of the 
Street : 

"A Wall Street financier now lies sick in 
his bed from terror lest the millions he made 
out of a property where he had a trusteeship 
relation shall be uncovered. 

"There will be many more sick beds for 
Wall Street financiers if some of the things 
that are now hatching in the Curb nests un- 
der the wings of the New York Stock Ex- 
change houses chip their shells and spread 
the feathers that are expected to carrv them 
quickly upward. 

"We hear of a concern that is dickering 
with one set of financiers over a sale for 
less than five millions, while another set of 
financiers is bidding nearer ten millions, with 
prospective promotion profits beyond the ten 
millions from the flotation to the public. The 
owner of the property knows it is not worth 
five millions and prefers to sell at less than 
five millions as an honest business venture 
rather than be a party to a flotation to the 
public at over ten millions. 

"We hear of another property to be pur- 
chased for two millions, capitalized at nine 
millions, and then to be sold to the public at 
more than ten millions. 

"There is another concern that has been 
floated on the Wall Street Curb where the 
cost was below $8 per share, the underwrit- 
ing price was above $30 per share, and the 
whole was floated upon the public at about 
$50 per share — and there it still floats. 

"Another has just been floated into public 
view at above $35 per share upon the New 
York Curb and the underwriting price in the 
financial office that floated it was less than 
$15 per share. 

"On a previous Wall Street booni, three 
underwriting syndicates tumbled one over 
the other in promotion of the same property, 
and when it was floated upon the public the 
financial people who were responsible for it 
stood in terror for some years lest their 
deeds be revealed. \Mien investigation 
pointed their way, they spent many restless 
nights. 

"This buying of legitimate business prop- 
erties for a million and floating them upon 
an innocent public at nearer ten millions has 
got to cease or there will be explosion and 
calamity in Wall Street that will shake the 
seven pillars of the Stock Exchange. 

"The Stock Exchange should demand that 
every proposition promoted by one of its 
members shows forth, as under the English 
law, to the public and the people who are 
invited to subscribe, the promoters' profits 
and the real assets and liabilities of the 
property. 

"There is responsibility for Curb promo- 
tions and Curb quotations with the tying-up 
of major ownerships in pools so that a • 
minority of the shares may be floated at an 
enormous price, that the New York Stock 
Exchange cannot dodge, when these chickens 
are brought home to roost at the doors of 
its own members, whose names now stand 
well up in the banking and brokerage world." 
This is not to be taken to mean that all 
transactions in the Street are questionable. 
The Wall Street Journal does not mean that, 
but it does call attention to the doings of 
certain financiers that propose to job and 
rob the innocent investor, and it holds the 
Stock Exchange to task for not interfering 



in this open wrong-doing. "Wrong doing 
nuisl stop or there will be an explosion," is 
a fair acknowledgment of the truth of the 
frequently expressed notion of the public that 
"Wall Street manages the welfare of the 
nation to the end that the greater part of the 
welfare is certain to get back to Wall 
Street." 



THE DOMINION OF LABOR. 



The picture of the victorious gladiator 
pausing above his prostrate antagonist, while 
the audience turns its thumbs down as a sign 
that the vanquished be given his quietus, 
seems to epitomize organized labor's position 
in the world to-day. Especially may this be 
said to be the monopolist's conception of it. 
It is bitter to have undisputed empire 
snatched from one's grasp at the moment 
when it seemed most assured. Having se- 
cured and capitalized all the special priv- 
ileges and obtained control of most of the 
known natural resources of the courrtry. 
Monopoly was looking forward to an era of 
undisturbed dominion. 

The war that was to make the world safe 
for democracy threatens to realize that pur- 
pose in a manner that the dollar-a-day men 
never contemplated — or if not safe for de- 
mocracy, for a more numerous oligarchy than 
that which has ruled in the past. 

Up to present writing most of labor's de- 
mands have been for higher wages. Econo- 
mists admit that wages have not kept pace 
with cost of living. So their demands are 
not unreasonable and are certainly not revo- 
lutionary. The insistence of labor on par- 
ticipation in the management of the indus- 
tries in which its members are employed was 
bound to come soon anyhow. The war only 
accelerated its arrival. From the day when 
businesses became so big that the human 
contact between boss and worker was lost, 
this development was inevitable. Despotisms 
are as much anachronisms in the industrial 
as in the political world. 

Then it is worth while considering whether 
the workers' united capital investment in the 
business, which they have trained themselves 
to perform, is not as great as their em- 
ployers'. Their interest in its continuance 
is often keener and more vital. Failure of a 
big business commonly brings more suflfering 
on the operatives than on the stockholders. 
If we can imagine machines which would 
do the work of men, the capital necessary 
for their acquisition would be enormous. 
Men in the past could usually be hired for 
little more than enough to buy the fuel that 
generated their energy. 

The strength of Labor and the weakness 
of the Interests — which is only a slang word 
for monopoly — proceeds from the drying up 
of the big reservoir of casual or unemployed 
labor, which was the biggest, though least 
recognized, factor in our past civilization. 
"More men than jobs" guaranteed servility 
and docility. The invisible but ever-present 
threat of starvation for the man who could 
not find an employer caused the workingman 
to speak with "bated breath and whispering 
humbleness." It is to be regretted that the 
vvorkingman's leaders have not generally em- 
l>loyed his day of power to solidify his eco- 
nomic position. Monopoly still controls those 
resources to which he must have access in 
order to live, and it will bring him to heel 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed hv American Federation of Labor 



Cummins' Bill Spells Revolution. 

Pronounced and vigorous opposition has 
developed against Senator Cummins' bill 
which contains a provision that would de- 
prive railroad employes of the right to 
strike. This provision of the bill has 
been given close and intensive study by 
the various railroad unions' officials who 
would be directly affected. As a result 
these officials, who represent over 2,000,000 
railroad workers, have issued a statement 
vigorously and mercilessly attacking this 
l^rovision of the measure and have de- 
termined on an intensive campaign to 
secure its defeat. 

The statement is signed by fourteen of- 
ficials and includes the presidents of the 
four railroad brotherhoods, the acting presi- 
dent of the railway employes' department 
of the American Federation of Labor and 
nine presidents of unions whose members 
are directly employed by the various rail- 
roads. 

The exact language of the Cummins pro- 
vision, against which the vigorous protest 
is being made, follows: 

"If two or more persons enter into any 
combination or agreement with the intent 
substantially to hinder, restrain or ])revent 
the movement of commodities or persons in 
interstate commeVce ; or enter into any com- 
bination or agreement which substantially 
hinders, restrains or prevents the movement 
of commodities, or i)ersons in interstate com- 
merce, such persons so combining and 
agreeing shall be deemed guilty of a con- 
spiracy, and shall be punished by a fine 
not exceeding $500 or by imprisonment 
not exceeding six months, or by both such 
fine and imprisonment; provided, that noth- 
ing herein shall be taken to deny to any 
individual the right to quit his employ- 
ment for any reason." 

"A law such as this would spell the end 
of labor organizations in America,'' says the 
statement. "Is this the intent of the pro- 
vision? Does Congress, at the behest of 
the alarmed system, propose to try to 
break up the organization of labor 
throughout the country? Is it decided 
that the time has come to make this 
final fight? These are the questions that 
demand an answer and which every work- 
ingman in the country is asking as he 
reads the newspapers. In his heart he 
knows that to enact this law would spell 
more than death to trade unionism. It 
would spell the birth of revolution. 

'This provision not only would make 
it illegal to strike with intent to hinder 
interstate commerce, b.ut also would make 
it illegal to enter into any combination or 
agreement which does hinder interstate 
commerce. Intent would not have to be 
proved in the courts. Thus the provision 
is ironclad, for any strike on the railroads, 
of however small proportions, would un- 
questionably hinder interstate commerce. 
The provision is carefully writen to re- 
move from railway labor the right to 
strike under any possible circumstances. 

"If this provision was enacted into law, 
it would impose upon railway labor two 
insupportable conditions, namely, compul- 
sorv arbitration and economic servitude. 



"The right to strike as a last resort 
is ingrained in the nature of the American 
working man ; he has inherited it from the 
Declaration of Independence, from the 
Constitution of the United States, from 
every tradition of this free people, from 
every achievement in the history of our 
great nation. If he failed to cherish his 
economic freedom he would no longer be 
a true American. To attem])t to put such a 
prohibitive law into operation, therefore, 
would be madness. No leadership in the 
world could restrain the rank and file of 
American labor under such an imposition. 
The human factors called forth would 
be bevond control." 



Why Such Low Pay for Professors? 

One of the Harvard graduates, says the 
New York World, who are now in Cam- 
bridge ])lanning its campaign for an en- 
dowment fund of $11,000,000 for the uni- 
versity, asked President Lowell why Har- 
vard faculties of former days had more 
eminent members than now, and was thus 
enlightened : "There are lots of good fish 
in the sea still, and plenty of good fish 
here, but they don't get enough to cat." 
And with regard to this cpiestion of suste- 
nance, posters displayed in the college 
yard showing figures of a professor and a 
motorman bear the inscription : "A motor- 
man gets 60 cents an hour, a professor 
18. Which is worth more, gentlemen, 
minding the train or training the mind?" 

That is a question which is bothering 
other people besides college presidents. In 
its broad application it is the presefit prob- 
lem of all "intellectuals" in its bearing 
on their future i)lace in the economic 
scheme. The ratio of the motorman's wages 
to the professor's causes a good deal of 
serious thinking on the part of young men 
just leaving college to make their way in 
the world. 

At one time a professor was a magnet 
which drew the best minds of the country 
to the college. But does the hope of the 
post compensate nowadays for the financial 
sacrifices? 

Industry offers a greater prize. High 
thinking with plain living has generally 
gone out of fashion. The trouble is that 
even the most generous college endow- 
ments conceivable cannot provide the 
"fishes" with as much to eat as they can 
find in the open sea. 



Labor Joins Hands With Co-operatives 

The New York Tribune's London corre- 
spondent sends the following story, dealing 
with the co-operative movement in Great 
Britain, from which is taken these ex- 
cerpts : 

"The great trade union movement in 
Britain, with its 5,000,000 members, has 
decided to join forces with the Union of 
British Co-operative Societies, with a mem- 
ber.ship of about 5,000,000, in order to domi- 
nate production, consumpton and distribution 
in Britain. 

"This amalgamation will represent the 
greatest business combination in history. It 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia, 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Internationale Transportarbeiter - Federation, 
Enjielufcr, 18, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicate des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev Wedels 
plads 5, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundt, Stock- 
liolm, Tunnelgaten IB., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Centrale Bond van Transportarbeiders, Hoofd- 
liestuur, 's Gravendykwal 111 te Rotterdam. 

Vakgroep Zeelieden, Pelikaanstraat 25, Rotter- 
dam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinlieiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Socicdada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritime des Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Set- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Worker. 



All opposition Ki-oup of moderates 
lias sprung up in the Norwegian ' 
labor party because of its decision to 
affiliate with the Moscow Interna- 
tional group. 

The Returned Soldiers' Association 
in Australia has passed a resolution 
declaring the office of State Gover- 
nor should be abolished. The reso- 
lution also says the Governor Gen- 
eral should bo an Australian. 

The Council of h'ive at Paris 
has decided to permit German repre- 
sentation at the International Labor 
Conference next month, accord- 
ing to an official cable from Paris. 
It says the announcement is made 
by the General Labor Confederation 
following a conference between its 
secretary-general and Premier Clem- 
enceau, at which the French Premier 
"took a broad view." The dispatch 
ad<ls that the decision was regarded 
as a great victory for the General 
Labor Confederation. 

The four British Socialist bodies 
have recently considered steps to 
amalgamate into one united Socialist 
Party. The British Socialist Party 
leaders have been conferring with 
the executives of the Socialist Labor 
Party, the Workers' Socialist Federa- 
tion, and the South Wales Socialist 
Society, and the only diflficulties in 
the way of unification were found 
to be matters of tactics rather than 
of principle. All bodies other than 
the B. S. P. were loath to consider 
affiliation with the Labor Party. A 
plan was agreed upon, however, 
whereby this question would not be 
decided until the four groups or as 
many of them as possible had 
merged their identities. 

The masses in India, and among 
them the factory laborers, said Mr. 
B. P. Wadia, president of the Madras 
labor union, before the joint com- 
mittee of the British Parliament, 
had a power of understanding po- 
litical and economic issues. The In- 
dian laborers loathed the idea of 
slavery in any form. There were, he 
said, some 17,515,000 workmen cm- 
ployed in industries, of whom 950,- 
000 were in large establishments. 
There was an Indian factories' 
act, which was originally passed in 
1881, and which was last amended 
in 1911. The law permitted twelve 
hours' work a day. Women were 
worked for eleven hours and cliil- 
dren between the ages of nine and 
fourteen were worked for six hours. 
Wages and sanitation were beyond 
human calculation. 

That discontent among middle- 
class or salaried workers, resulting 
in organization for the expression 
of their demands, has spread as 
far as Japan, is declared by Charles 
Hodges, lecturer on I'ar Eastern 
trade at New York University. Mr. 
Hodges says Japan has a league 
for the improvement of the wages 
of salaried men, whose demands 
are: That profits of limited com- 
panies be distributed first among 
employees and afterward among 
shareholders; that there should be 
a reserve fund for the benefit of 
retiring employees, to be controlled 
by the employees' union; that period 
of service should be limifcd and a 
minimum living wage established. 
The league, says Mr. Hodges, is ad- 
vocating an associated movement of 
persons in the middle class. Labor 
propaganda is being pushed by the 
Nippon Rodo Rcngo Kai, or the 
Japanese .\ssociated Labor Society. 



M. BROWN &i SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529i/j BEACON STREET. SAN PEDRO. CAL. 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In 
the sunny south, Is the ideal place. Captain Frerichs has established a Nav- 
igation School here and under his undivided personal supervision students 
will be thoroughly prepared to pass successfully before the United States 
Steamboat Inspectors. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



Attention, Look! 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 
SUITS and UNIFORMS 

made to order by expert tailors and designers. Best selection 
of imported and domestic woolens. 

Also ready-made Suits, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Trunks, Suit- 
Cases, Sailors' Canvas Bags, Oilskin Clothes, Rubber Boots, 
Bedding, Blankets and Toilet Articles. 

Slopchest Outfits, Wholesale. 



Free information 
of the movements 
of all vessels under 
every flag. 



Free use of read- 
ing, writing and 
rest room on the 
mezzanine floor. 



Macarthur's 

NAVIGATION LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES 

CAPT. CUGLE'S BOOK, SIMPLE RULES IN NAVI- 
GATION. THE BLUE BOOK OF FACTS, A HAND- 
BOOK FOR THE MARINE ENGINEER. 

Nautical Instruments 

CAPTAINS' LEATHER CARRYING-CASES FOR SHIP'S 
PAPERS. NAUTICAL ADVICE TO ALL 
PARTS OF THE GLOBE. 

Twelve years ago the smallest, to-day the largest, best 

equipped and cleanest exclusive seafaring men's 

store in the world. 

A visit to this store will convince you. 

CAPTAIN CHAS. J. SWANSON 

36 Steuart Street, near Market 

In the Soulhem Pacific Building 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Telephone Douglas 1082 



S. G. SWANSON 

listubllslied i;i04 
For the BEST there Is in TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE — S. U. Swanson is not connected 
with any dye works ami lias no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2a Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABKAHAMSEN. Prop. 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING. SHOES. HATS. RL'BBER 

AND OIL CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eureka, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN. Prop. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the wliereabouts 
of L. C. S. Admiraal, a member of 
the Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Asso- 
ciation, last heard of in Rctterdam, 
Holland, 1914, will please notify his 
brother J. J. Admiraal, 51 South 
Street, New York, N. Y. 8-13-19 



Information wanted regarding John 
Johnsen, native of Bergen, age 44, 
last heard from in New Orleans, 
1917, was then on schooner "Lizzie 
M. Parson," going to France. Any 
information will be appreciated by 
his brother, Andsew Johnsen, Sail- 
ors' Union, Seattle, Wash. 8-20-19 



Will Ingwald Johnson, Charles 
M oiler, and any other member of 
the crew of the S. S. "Chehalis," on 
January 29, 1919, when Otto Peter- 
son was injured, kindly report to the 
Secretary, Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, San Francisco, Cal. 8-13-19 



STATEIVIENT OF THE OWNERSHIP. .'.MK*CEMENT. 
CIRCULATION. ETC.. REBUIRED BY THE ACT OF 
CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24. 1912, 

of The Seamen'-i .loiiriial. piihllslicci weekly at S:in 
Fram-i.HTO, Cal.. for October 1. IIUO: 

State of rallfomia. 
County of San KranCsco — ss. 

Before me. a NoUry Public in and for the State 
ami county aforesaid, personally apni'i'r"rt S. A. 
Silver, who, havlnu been duly sworn according to law, 
ilcpost'i and says that he Is the Business Manager of 
Tile Seamen's Journal, and that the foUowinR l.s, to 
the best of his knowledge and liellef, a true state- 
nifnl of the o»nershi|i, management (and If a dally 
paper, the rirculallon I . etc.. of the aforesaid publira- 
lion for the date shown in the above caption, re- 
quired by the Act of August -M. 19ia, embodied in 
.section 44:!, Postal Laws ami Kegulations, printed on 
the rvvepie of this form, to wit; 

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, 
editor, managing editor, and business managers are: 

Name of Postodlce address — 

Publisher, Sailors' fnlon of the PacWe. Sm Francisco, 

Cal, 
Kdilnr, Paul Scharrenberg, San Francisco, Cal. 
Managing Editor, Paul Scharrenberg, San Francisco. 

Cal. 
Business Manager. S. A. Silver. San Francisco, Cal. 

2. That the owners are: (Give names and addresses 
of individual owners, or. if a corporation, give Its 
name and the names and addresses of stoikholders 
owning or holding 1 per cent, or more of the total 
amount of stock.) 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, San Francisco; not a 
corporation. Principal offlecrs of the Sailors' Union; 
Andrew Furuseth, Secretarj', San Francisco; John H. 
Tcnnison. AssisUnt Secretary. San Francisco. 

:i. That the. known bondholders, mortgagees, and 
oilier security holders owning or holding 1 per cent, or 
more of total amount of bunds, mortgages, or other 
securilles are: (If there are none, so state.) 

None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving the 
names of the owners, stockholders, and security holileri. 
if any. rontjiln not only the list of storkholders and 
security holders as they appear upon the hooks of the 
company hut also, in cases where the stockholder o' 
security holder appears upon the liooks of Hie "omnany 
as trustee or in any other flduclary relation, the name 
of the person or corporation for whom such tnhxee is 
acting, is given; atso that the said two paragraplis 
lontaln statements embracing affiant's full knowlerlge 
I and belief as to the circumstances and conditions uiiiler 
which slockholders and semrlly holders who do not 
appear upon the hooks of the company as trustees, hold 
stock ami securities In a capacity other than that of 
a bona fide owner; and this affiant has no rea.son to 
believe that any other person, association, or corpora- 
tion has any Interest direct or indirect in the said 
stock, bonds, or other siKUrltles than as so stateil 
Iq' him. 

S. A. SILVER. Business Manager. 

Sworn to and sul)scrll)ed before me this S.'^rd day 
of September. 1 !)!!>. 

(Seal) JIABfiUEBITA S. BRUNEK. 

' I Mr crininiission e\pin-s Jan. », lft22.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Three steamers, the American trader "Bel- 
vedere," the Russian steamer "Stavanpol" and 
another American steamer, whose name could 
not be made out, are caught in the ice at the 
entrance to Kolyuchian bay, on the coast of 
Siberia, according to a wireless message re- 
ceived at Nome from P. M. Alexander, a 
trader at Anadyr, a Siberian coast point. 

The British steamer "Eastern Queen," which 
left San Francisco on September 5 for Yoko- 
hama and Kobe, put into Honolulu, according 
to advices received at San Francisco by the 
Marine Department of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. The report states the freighter during 
heavy weather lost her deckload and would 
proceed as soon as a survey could be made. 

For a price not given out, Henry G. Seaborn, 
first vice-president of the Skinner and Eddy 
Corporation and general manager, recently pur- 
chased the four-masted schooner "Camano" from 
Balfour, Guthrie & Co. Following the deal he 
chartered the vessel to the former owners for 
a voyage from Puget Sound to Sydney, Aus- 
tralia, with a full cargo of lumber, 850,000 feet. 

Three wooden ship contracts have been re- 
instated in the Columbia River district. The 
hulls had already been launched, but installation 
of machinery has been withheld. The contracts 
affected are the ships "Montezuma" and "Arvo- 
nia," built in the Vancouver (Wash.) yard of 
the G. M. Standifer Construction Corp., and 
the "Boynton," built by the Coast Shipbuilding 
Co. of Portland. 

The China Mail S. S. Corp., San Francisco, 
has issued its report for the fiscal year ended 
June .'^0, 1919, showing remarkable earnings, 
when it is considered the fleet has been under 
charter to United States and Great Britain more 
tiian half of that period. The statement shows 
gross income, $1,968,152: operating expenses, 
$777,325; depreciation, $150,158; leaving a bal- 
ance of net earnings of $1,040,668. Deductions 
for bond interest leave a l);ilance to surplus of 
$928,108. 

The Pacific Steamship Company has applied 
to the State Railroad Commission for authority 
to increase its freight rates between California 
points approximately $1 a ton. The reason 
stated is a loss of $166,463.29 in operating for 
the first seven months in 1919 and a further 
increase in operating expenses effective since 
August 1, which will double the previous loss. 
The company also seeks authority to raise its 
loading charges at San Francisco on account 
of increfised wages paid to stevedores. The 
company applied a week ago for permission 
to raise passenger rates. 

The Hanlon Shipbuilding Company has con- 
tracted to repair, overhaul, and completely reno- 
vate the steamship "George W. Elder." The 
former Crowley vessel, which is now owned 
by Carlos E. Artegas of Valparaiso, has his chief 
consulting engineer, Leo Pender, on hand, and 
it has been arranged to make the "Elder" as 
good as new. Hanlon has promised that he 
will do the work for nothing if he does not 
turn out a better ship than the original. After 
the vessel has been reconditioned she will be 
loaded for the West Coast by Williams, Dimond 
& Co., and after arrival at Valparaiso will be 
retained there for the coastwise trade. 

The steam schooner "Northfork" and a cargo 
of 500 tons are reported a total loss on the 
beach south of Point Gorda, about 90 miles 
south of Eureka. Captain John Nelson made his 
way overland from the scene of the wreck to 
Garberville, a distance of eighteen miles, to 
the nearest telephone. The wreck occurred 
Sunday, September 21, at 4 p. m. The "North- 
fork" was built on Humboldt Ray at the Ben- 
dixen yards in 1890 for the present owners, the 
Charles Nelson Company. Captain John Nelson 
is one of the oldest skippers on the coast, hav- 
ing made hundreds of trips to Eureka, where 
he was formerl}' a bar pilot for the Humboldt 
Lumber Manufacturers' Association. The "North- 
fork" is said to have rested on the beach with 
little damage till the following morning, when 
she commenced going to pieces and the crew 
took to the boatj, landing at Shelter Cove, one 
of the most isolated landing places on the 
coast. 

A mass meeting representing all of the ship- 
I'ing and commercial interests of San Francisco 
will be called by the Chamber of Commerce to 
determine the feasibility of launching the $100,- 
(X)0,000 steamship organization for San Fran- 
cisco, as was proposed recently by A. C. Worth- 
ington, vice-president of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. This was decided upon a few days ago 
when the special committee appointed to in- 
vestigate the Wortliington plan met in the 
Merchants' Exchange building. The most im- 
portant initial matter that will he handled at 
the mass meeting will be to appeal to the 
steamship concerns, importers, exporters, fore- 
warders, brokers and all concerned in San 
I'rancisco's overseas trade to come forward and 
lend their effort in co-operating to reveal the 
exact conditions of shipiiiiig and trade now 



existing here. It is proposed that a special 
committee shall be appointed at the mass meet- 
ing to make a complete investigation of the 
records of the concerns involved in the city's 
commerce, that these records shall be carefully 
and comprehensively tabulated and investigated, 
and from these a thorough and complete state- 
ment of the needs of the port in the matter 
of ships and. shipping shall be obtained. 

That the Pacific Coast is sadly in need of 
the installation of a series of compass control 
stations as an aid to navigation became appar- 
ent recently when advices were received telling 
of a collision between the steamers "Johanna 
Smith" and "La Primera." The "Smith," which 
is owned and operated by the Coos Bay Lum- 
ber Company, was steaming toward Mfirshfield 
between Eureka and Cape Blanco, when she 
collided with the "La Primera," which is o^vned 
and operated by Walter S. Scammel. Both ves- 
sels were damaged, btit were able to continue 
toward their destinations. The Scammel craft 
is en route from San Francisco for Coos Bay. 
It is pointed out by shipping men that the 
Government has installed the compass control 
stations on the Atlantic in numerous pl.Tces 
and these have prevented many wr-2cks and 
saved the ship owners huge sums. An appeal 
will be made to Washington to have similar 
safeguards established along the coasts of Cal- 
ifornia, Washington and Oregon as soon as pos- 
sible. All of the navigators who have re- 
turned from the Atlantic contend that if the^e 
arc installed here there will be few wrecks 
.owing to foggy weather. The collision of the 
"Johanna Smith" and "La Primera" resulted 
from a heavy fog. 

While the opening prices on canned salmon 
were made chiefly by the independent packers, 
it is likely that prices to be quoted by the 
larger packers will not vary substantially from 
these. CJpening prices, f. o. b. coast 1919 pack, 
Alaska: salmon have been made by one oi^ the 
largest packers as follows: Reds, tails, $3.35; 
flats, $3.50; halves, $2.25; medium red, tails, $3; 
flats, $3.15; halves, $2; pinks, tails, $2.25; flats, 
$2.40; chums, tails, $2.15; flats, $2.30; halves, 
$1.25. Just what effect the opening prices will 
have on the New York spot market is still 
problematical. For instance. No. 1 tall pinks 
opened at $2.25, f. o. b. coast, while the New 
York spot market remained at $2.15. Tn(|uirics 
for supplies, while not quite so heavy in the 
export trade on account of the falling exchange, 
.still continue numerous in domestic quarters, with 
but very light stocks in the hands of dealers 
liere. The market still shows a wide range of 
prices, but as the opening quotations are high, 
little business has been under way. Columbia 
River chinooks, reds, pinks and cohoes all show 
a substantial increase in price. These advances 
are in 'a large measure due to the disappoint- 
ingly small pack on the Pacific Coast, as a 
result of which the packers have been enabled 
to deliver only 35 to 50 per cent, of their con- 
tracts. British Columbia packers have also 
made opening prices on sockeyes, and while the 
list has not yet arrived, halves are reported at 
$15 coast. 

Walter S. Scammell, of San Francisco, who 
has just turned the schooner "William E. Burn- 
ham'.' over to Captain E. L. Whitney, the pur- 
chaser, announced that he intends to install a 
small, but powerful, motor launch aboard each 
of the sailing ships of the fleet. And the reason 
for all this is that the ship owner and operator 
has cleaned up a comfortable lot of loose change 
in addition to the big picking, because the 
"Burnham" happened to be equipped with the 
small launch. The schooner under command of 
Captain Worth was sailing toward this port 
from Sydney when a calm was encountered. 
The commander scratched his head and had 
about decided that he would not arrive here in 
time for the owner to fulfill the terms of the 
$1,375^ case oil charter, when he happened to 
glimpse the launch hanging aft from the davits. 
The launch was dropped over the side and at- 
tached to the stem by a long tow line. It re- 
quired several minutes to get the heavy laden 
ship under way, but she started after a bit and 
in a half hour traveled along at a three knot 
rate. Worth towed for forty-eight hours and 
then struck a bit of wind. He made five tows 
(luring the voyage, which proved a fast one, and 
Scammell had just niije days left in which to 
deliver for the charter when the "Burnham" 
arrived here. Then the strike came along, but 
Scammell managed to get the "Burnham" along 
side the pier ready to receive the cargo of case 
oil just two hours before the time limit expired. 
The present rate is only 60c. per case. And 
now Scammell says he will never let another 
sailing ship leave port without a launch. 

F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., 3rd Floor, California 
St nr. Montgomery. Phone, Sutter 5807 (Adv ) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 




Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 

and 

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS' FEDERATION. 



THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 
328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago. Ut. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 
Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 
NEW YORK CITY....GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa. ..OSCAR CHRISTIANSEN. Agt. 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM. Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS. Va T. NELSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE, Ala W. F, CATTELL, Ageni 

68 Va South Michael Street 

NEW ORI-EANS. La O. MORTENSEN Agent 

400y2 Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex D. F. PERRY. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN. Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. I H. BLANKE, Agent 

492 South Water Street 

PORTLAND, Me C. MARTELL, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 



MARINE COOKS AND STtWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE, Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 
Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. QUINN, Agent 

54 Commercal Place 

NEWPORT NEWS WM. J. SIGGERS. Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

BALTIMORE. Md F. R. STOCKL. Agent 

802-804 South ftrnadwnv 

PHILADELPHIA. Pa..O. CHRISTIANSEN, Suh. Agt. 

206 Moravian Streel 

MOBILE, Ala C. RAVING. Suh. Agent 

104 South Commeroe Strpf>t 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex.. .G. ^SCHROEDER, Sub. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex J. CLAUSEN, Sub. Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarteis: 

NEW Y'ORK, N. Y 70 Soutli Street 

Teleplione John 075 and 976 
New York Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y 110 Hamilton Avenue 

Branches: 

PHILADEI>PHIA. Pa 138 South Second Street 

RAT,TTMORE. Md 80? Snutli Rron.lwnv 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 123 Twentv-tliird Street 

PORT ARTHUR. Tex i:^" I'rortm- Street 

GALVESTON, Tex 3211/2 20th Street 

BOSTON. Mass 3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK. Va 513 East Main Street 

NVAV ORLEANS. La 40ni/2 FuUnn Street 

MOBILE, Ala 6OV2 St. Michael Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 492 South Water Street 

PORTLAND, Maine 5 Exchange Street 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Branches: 

GLOTTCERTER. Mass 163 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y JOHN R. FOLAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

PORTLAND, Maine WM. HOLLAND, Agent 

18 Commercial Wharf 

PROVINCETOWN, Mass i--' ;AVV •■.■"■ . 

PRANK L. RHODERICK, Agent 

Commercial Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. Y ■• .. 

HARRY F. McGARRIGEL. Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 
NEW BEDFORD, Mass . CHARL ES E. DOUCETT, Agt. 

LAKE DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO 111 THOS. A. HANSON, Treasurer 

3''S w' Randolph Street, Phone Franklin 278 

BUFFALO N Y GEORGE HANSEN, Agent 

55 Main Street. Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND. O GEO. L. MARTIN. Agent 

308 W Superior Avenue, Phone Main 1842 

MILWAUKEE, Wis....CHAS. BRADHERING. Agent 

162 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich K. B. NOLAN, Agent 

44 Shelby Street, Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 47 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, O S. R. DYE. Agent 

704 Summit Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. O JOHN MORRIS. Agent 

992 Day Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 

'^^ PATRICK O'BRIEN. Ajent 

122% Main Street, Phone 890 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 fl2H Harbor Avenue 

Phone South Chicago H>9<> 

SUPERIOR. Wis 832 Banks A»aiiiiP 

(Continued on Pare 11.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The 


Seamen's 


Journal 


Publ 


shed weekly at San Francisco | 




BY THE 






SAILORS' UNION OF 


THE 


PACIFIC 




Established in 


1887 





PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

S. A. SILVER Business Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Office, Maritime Hall Building, 

B9 Clay Street, San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 



Changes In advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for In Section 1103, Act of Octo- 
ber 3, 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



^^■EDXESDAY, OCTOBER E 1919. 



X.\TL'RAE RESOURCES 



That tile high cost of living cannot be 
dealt with permanently unles.s the problem 
of unemj)loyment is solved at the same 
time, and that the increased production 
necessary to solve both problems cannot 
be obtained without making idle lands and 
natural resources more accessible to labor, 
is the conclusion reached by a report issued 
by the Department of Labor on "Employ- 
ment and Natural Resources," written by 
Benton INIacKaye, an expert in the office 
of the Secretary of Labor. 

No appreciable decrease in the cost of 
living can be expected so long as superficial 
factors only are dealt with. High prices 
of manufactured products generally reflect 
either high prices for raw materials, or 
lack of organization in transportation and 
distribution. An effective policy must start 
with the land from which the "extractive" 
industries draw raw materials and must 
follow the subsequent industrial processes 
clear through to the consumer. Coupled 
with this must be changes in the "distribu- 
tive" industries so that products will flow 
smoothly from "land to men." 

A substantial increase in production is 
unlikely, says the report, so long as the 
average wage earner is unemployed 20 per 
cent, of his time and 50 per cent, of our 
land and natural resources are unused. A 
scheme for bringing together these potential 
productive factors Js presented. The main 
points involved in this scheme are the 
following: 

1. Unemployed labor should wherever pos- 
sible be diverted to farm communities estab- 
lished under public supervision, thus relieving 
unemployment and increasing the supply of 
foodstuffs. 

2. Economic waste can be minimized bv a 
proper organization of forests and mines. The 
hnnlser industry is not yet one of forestry 
or "timber culture," as it-'is in Europe; it is 
still one of "timber mining." It is a tramp 
industry and therefore a breeder of tramps. 
The migratory lumberjack, or "timber wolf," 
must remain a hobo until the logging camp is 
supplanted l>y the forest community. 

3. Power resources must be organized under 
public control. Water power must be co-ordi- 
nated with coal power. Wherever possible the 
"white coal" of falling water should be substi- 



tuted for the black coal of the underground. 

4. Transportation and marketing systems 
must be organized under public control. The 
farm community should be linked with the city 
market. Railway, waterway, and motor truck 
services should be effectively co-ordinated. 

5. The construction of public works must be 
more effectively organized. The plans worked 
out in the report call for a large program of 
road building to be followed by "farm building" 
outside the cities. To carry out such of this 
work as is done under the Federal Government, 
a Public Construction Service is suggested, to 
be run under proper standards of labor. Tem- 
porary enployment in such a Construction Serv- 
ice would lead to permanent employment on 
the land being opened. 

In [prefacing the report Secretary of 
Labor Wilson says that the primary requi- 
site of any scheme of public land develop- 
ment is the "elimination of everything 
resembling — even remotely — the specula- 
tion in, or private appropriation of, natural 
or community-made values." The report 
therefore urges the necessity for the adop- 
tion of the conservation principle of retain- 
ing in public hands the ultimate control 
of all natural resources, and for such 
restriction of titles as is necessary to 
jjrevent speculation. In all of which the 
JoiKX.vr. heartily concurs as long deferred 
stojis in the right direction. 



I'ABRICATED SHIPS 



The fabricated ship is an American innova- 
tion that was adopted as a war measure 
to hasten the completion of that vital "bridge 
of ships"' which was to hurry our armies 
to the battle lines. The war is over, and 
now it is reali?ed that the requirements of 
peace may expand this war baby to giant 
size, and give America, already the leading 
shipbuilding nation of the world, not only 
an unlimited foreign market for this type 
of vessel, but a new and expanding market 
for its manufactured steel. 

H. R. Carse, President of the Submarine 
Boat Corporation of Newark Bay. recently 
laid before Chairman Payne of the United 
States Shipping Board, a proposal from 
an Italian shipping company, to purchase 
all fabricated parts, machinery and equip- 
ment for a 5,350 ton steamship, the Italian 
corporation adding that it is disposed to 
inirchase four vessels of the same type and 
tonnage, duplicates of the ships being built 
by the Submarine Boat Corporation for 
the Linited States Shipping Board. 

As the Newark Bay plant is one of those 
being operated by the United States Shipping 
Board, it was necessary to obtain official 
sanction for the acceptance of this foreign 
order. This was accorded and Henry R. 
Sutphen. Vice-President of the company, 
has sailed for Italy to confer with the 
Italian company. The fabricated parts are 
to be assembled in Palermo. 

There is a world shortage of ships. Many 
nations are in dire need of more tonnage 
and would like, to build ships of their own. 
But many nations such as Italy and Japan 
are short of iron ore ; in others such as 
Spain and Sweden, production has fallen 
ofif. America has an almost inexhaustible 
supply. Moreover, it can deliver its steel 
in every port of the world at a cheaper rate 
than any competitor. Its chief rival is 
Great Britain. But the latest available quota- 
tion for steel ship plates turned out from 
British plants for export, is ,£ 19 5s. per 
ton, equivalent at the i)resent rate of 
exchange to $79.79, United Kingdom ports. 
The .American price for the same product 
is $33 jier ton. United States ports. 



It is this demand for ships and the fact 
that the parts can now be fabricated in 
American shipyards, transported abroad and 
there assembled at a less cost than they 
can be built under the old method, which 
makes it apparent that this new industry 
is likely to undergo a great expansion, with 
the consequent stimulation of manufacture 
in many sections of the countrv. 



A NEW SOUNDING DEVICE. 



Gone are the days, mates, when, having 
made soundings, we used to heave the old 
hooker to with her main yards aback, all 
hands lined along the weather rail, each 
man holding a bight of the lead line in his 
hand to keep it from fouling, while the 
leadsman on the forecastle-head hove the 
deep-sea lead to windward, bawling in sten- 
torian tones, "Watch, there ; watch !" Not 
again will our souls be cheered, after weary 
months of battling with "Old Briny," by 
hearing the mate telling the old man, 
"Seventy fathoms, sir, an' sandy bottom.'' 
For, alas and alack for the romance of those 
days, the "marimeter." the latest scientific 
wrinkle for taking soundings at sea, has 
knocked the old deep-sea lead galley west on 
its road to the scrap heap of nautical an- 
tiquities. 

By all the rules of eternal change it should 
have been a far cry from the clumsy, twenty- 
eight pound, tallow-primed deep-sea lead to 
the "marimeter," but the transition has come 
almost overnight. There is nothing much 
startling in that, however. Indeed, the new 
invention is just one more of the many 
straws emphasizing the revolutionary char- 
acter of the age we live in; an age that has 
probably witnessed greater changes in the 
mechanics of the seafaring industry than 
have all the preceding ages combined. 

lUit by this time some of you are no doubt 
asking. "What may a 'marimeter' be like?" 

It is a small, electrically controlled instru- 
ment placed onboard of a ship for the pur- 
])ose of enabling the navigating officer in 
command to ascertain at any desired time the 
exact depth of water beneath the ship's keel. 
Its working principle is based upon the 
properties of sound active in producing 
echoes. Sound travels through water at the 
unvarying rate of 4,000 feet per second, or 
rather more than three times as fast as it 
travels through the air. Sound traveling 
through water also acquires a much greater 
volume per unit of energy expended in its 
production than it does traveling through 
the atmosphere. Take two small cobble 
stones and lightly knock them against each 
other. The sound thus produced is, of 
course, familiar to you. Then dive under 
water with the stones. Repeat the process 
of knocking them against each other, and 
the result will be a deafening report almost 
loud enough to burst your eardrums. Just 
try the experiment the next time you go 
swimming. 

But, to return to the "marimeter," it is 
described as a combination device, including 
a microphone, a hammer 'and gong, a dial, 
and the driving machinery. A small electric 
battery furnishes sufficient power for taking 
the deepest soundings. 

.Soundings may be taken at any point 
directly beneath the .ship's hull, forward or 
aft, to starboard or to port, under the center 
of the keel, or at all of these points at the 
same time. When the officer on watch 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



wishes to take a sounding he throws a 
switch to start the machinery. Next he 
presses a small push button. This causes the 
hammer to tap the gong. The sound travels 
to the bottom of the ocean at the rate of 
4,000 feet per second, and the echo returns 
at the same speed. An indicator on the dial 
is set in motion when the gong is tapped. 
When the echo returns and strikes the micro- 
phone the dial finger is instantly stopped. 
The distance it has traveled on the dial may 
then be read by the observer, and indicates 
in fathoms the depth of water under the 
.ship. As many as four soundings may be 
taken and recorded per minute continuously 
if desired. 

As at present constructed the "marimeter" 
is believed to give correct soundings down 
to a depth of 500 fathoms. Sound waves 
may also be directed toward a nearby shore 
hid in fog, and the distance will instantly 
be recorded on the dial. In short, next to 
wireless telegraphy the "marimeter" is re- 
garded as the most valuable aid to navigation 
invented up to ,date ; particularly to coastwise 
navigation. And it will doubtless be im- 
proved upon as time goes on — or until 
superseded by something better. 



The wreck off Shelter Cove of the steam 
schooner "North Fork" again brings to the 
fore the great importance of taking fre- 
quent and careful soundings while running 
along the shore in thick weather. Captain 
John Nelson, the veteran master of the 
vessel, frankly admits that his neglect to do 
so was the cause of the disaster. In view 
of the known facts in connection with the 
wreck the reported invention of a "mari- 
meter" should be hailed by mariners as a 
veritable godsend. When the navigator has 
only to press an electric button to imme- 
diately obtain an exact record of the depth 
of water beneath the ship, he will have to 
think up a better excuse for running her on 
the rocks than the time-worn one, "I took 
a chance once too often." 



CONDITIONS IN GREAT BRITAIN. 



According to advices received here a few 
days ago Captain Adolph C. Pedersen ("Hell- 
fire" Pedersen), master of the barkentine 
"Puako," and his two sons, Adolph Jr. and 
Leonard, mates of the vessel, have been 
found guilty in the United States District 
Court at New York of having illtreated their 
crew. The maximum penalty for this ofifense 
is five years' imprisonment, or a fine, or 
both, at the discretion of the court. 

It is to be hoped that the court will see 
its way clear to inflict the maximum penalty 
on this precious trio of buckoes. Even at 
that they will get off much too lightly, for 
their crime was one of the most flagrant of 
its kind recorded in the marine annals of 
recent vears. 



If Labor wants more it must produce 
more, is the latest ultimatum of the profit- 
takers. At first blush that looks like a fair 
enough proposition. But when you turn the 
thing around a bit its spaciousness soon be- 
comes apparent. If the person who does 
the turning is a worker he is almost certain 
to say, "Produce more, aye; but for who?" 
And there's the rub, gentlemen ; produce 
for who? As long as production is carried 
on mainly for the benefit of the profit-takers 
what incentive is there for the workers to 
produce a surplus of goods and thus work 
themselves out of their jobs? 



W. A. Appleton, President of the new In- 
ternational Federation of Trade Unions, 
Sounds a Pessimistic Note. 



The tragedy which threatens to overwhelm 
Britain proceeds in regular fashion. Gradually, 
but definitely, is unfolded the plot to bring 
misery upon the people in the expectation that 
misery may advance revolution and exalt the 
demagogues who would become autocrats. 
There has been the battle of phrases, the ava- 
lanche of promises, and the sapping of moral 
fibre. To-day there is the game of tactics be- 
tween the revolutionaries who control the 
Miners' Federation and the Railway Workers' 
Organization. To-morrow one may confidently 
anticipate the outbreak. 

Circumstances follow each other with the 
regularity, though not the harmony, of a musi- 
cal cadence. There has been preparation, now 
there is percussion, and to-morrow there will 
be resolution and revolution that may involve 
dissolution of the British Empire. 

In the battle of phrases, even the Govern- 
ment has joined. It has seen salvation in nine- 
pence for fourpence, in acceptance of the de- 
mand that workers should be remunerated ac- 
cording to their desires, instead of according 
to their earning capacities, in the resuscitation 
of the discredited labor laws and conditions 
of Edward III. It has permitted and does 
permit fraud in high and low places to go 
unpunished or under-punished. 

The Government is at a disadvantage in 
the battle of words and promises. It is ex- 
pected to make good its utterances and fulfill 
its promises. This involves expense, and in 
endeavoring to raise the money with which to 
meet expenses, the Government incurs opposi- 
tion and unpopularity. So far it has met the 
situation by more words and more promises, 
and by the creation of an administrative ma- 
chine which it estimates will, this year, cost 
one hundred and sixteen and a half millions. 
It has so far found no method of turning the 
developing tragedy into a drama with a happy 
ending. It has still no ascertainable policy. 

A few weeks ago an eminent Polish statesman 
asked me whether the men who formed the 
British Government had read history or studied 
economics. I hastened to assure him that most 
of them had passed through the public schools 
and the universities, and that, presumably, they 
were .conversant with both subjects. Then why 
in the name of greatness do they ignore the 
teachings of history and economics in their 
treatment of internal politics? The answer to 
the supplemental question I was unable to give, 
and yet I do not know whether it is ignorance 
or incapacity or fear which prevents the pro- 
mulgation and enforcement of a policy aimed 
at conserving the real interests of the Empire. 

A few men who frighten the Government and 
mislead Labor, and through Labor the whole 
Empire, start their campaign with many ad- 
vantages. They have, in the main, to deal 
with an unthinking proletariat. They may en- 
rich their promises with rhetoric's choicest 
ornaments; they may build not castles in Spain, 
but empires on formulae. They have no 
responsibility. They usually sufifer from moral 
obliquity and constructive paralysis. To demand 
rather than to provide is their metier. The 
consequences of these demands are either be- 
yond their intelligence or without influence up- 
on their consciences. They will cheerfully 
adopt and promulgate every panacea of the 
ancients or the moderns, and just as cheer- 
fully discard and forget them. Whoever dies 
they live; whoever fails they are triumphant. 

It is no use analyzing intentions. A nation 
faced with strangulation can only deal with 
effects, and the effects of the propaganda which 
these revolutionaries have fathered are culmi- 
nating in disaster. 

The friends of the men really responsible for 
the troubles in the mines and on the railways 
and in the docks may argue that all of them 
are altruists, but to the average man it seems 
very much as if their altruism was for abroad 
and not for home. Whatever their intentions, 
the fact remains that they have brought English 
industry into perilous circumstances and British 
workmen to the certainty of grave suffering and 
possibly starvation. 

Faced with a restriction of output of coal 
and an inefficient and costly system of railways, 
faced daily with sporadic strikes, what will the 
Government do? The answer to the first ques- 
tion is easier to find than that of the second. 
The Government will do what it has been doing 
since Mr. Asquith gave his famous advice to 
follow prices with wages. It will temporize m 
the Micaberan hope of something turning up. 
Salvation lies now, as always, with the na- 
tion. Upon the manner in which it faces the 
situation everything depends. Each individual 
must accept his own share of responsibility and 
perform his own task. 

The flooding of mines and the cessation ol 
work on railways destroys wealth and rots 
food. It is useless to talk of taxing wealth 
which chicanery and folly have destroyed, or 
of enjoying food which unreasonmg railway 
(Continued on Page lO.) 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Head<|uarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 29, 1919. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping dull and lots of members ashore. 
Full Shipwreck Benefit was awarded to the mem- 
bers of the crew of S. S. "North Fork." Quar- 
terly Finance Committee was elected to examine 
the income and expenditures for the last quarter. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, 

Secretary pro tem. 
Maritime Hall Bldg.. 59 Clay Street Tel. 
Kearny 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 22, 1919. 
No meeting. Shipping slow. 

J. ETCHELLS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block. 1424 Government 
Street; 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 22, 1919. 
Shipping good. 

W. G. MILLARD, Agent. 
58 Powell Street E. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 22, 1919. 
Shipping medium. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 22, 1919. 
Shipping quiet. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent pro tem. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. tJox dS. Tel. Main 4403. 



.'\berdecn Agency, Sept. 22, 1919. 
Shipping good; mert scarce. ' 

ED. ROSENBERG, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 22, 1919. 
Shipping good; prospects good. Donated $50 
to the Laundry Workers now on strike. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
881/ Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 22, 1919. 
Shipping fair; men scarce. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
USyi Sepulveda BIdg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 15, 1919. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, .San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 25, 1919. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping slow. The Quarterly Finance 
Committee was elected to go over the finances 
of the Union for the past quarter. The full 
Shipwreck Benefit was ordered paid to two 
members wrecked on the S. S. "North Fork." 
EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955, 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 18, 1919. 
Siiijiping medium. More members around. 
J. LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock. Room 203. P. O. Box 
214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 18, 1919. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; few members 
around. 

JOE MACK. Agent. 
613 Beacon Street. Phone Sunset 336. P. O. 
Box 54. 



Unless at least one more Pacific cable is laid, 
the development of American trade with the 
Orient will be seriously retarded, H. G. Eld- 
ridgc, chief of the Far Eastern division of the 
Bureau of Commerce, told a Senate committee 
during the past week. The committee is con- 
sidering a bill appropriating $8,000,000^ for a 
(iovernment cable acrerss the Pacific. Eldridge 
said at least $25,000,000 would be required, and 
Senator Jones of Washington, author of the 
measure, said that sum would be asked, as the 
original estimate was made years ago, before 
costs of labor and material had increased. 



8 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(By Laurence Todd.) 



\\itli the callinij of the great steel strike, 
which began on Monday, September 22, 
organized labor in America enters upon 
what may be the last battle with the 
industrial overlords of this nation. Out 
of this strike will come bitterness and vio- 
lence, if the steel barons, headed by Judge 
Gary can have their way; the cry of "Bol- 
shevism" will be raised against every 
striker and every strike sympathizer; gun- 
men and even State troops, if the steel 
masters prevail, will be used to bruise and 
torture and kill the workers who i)icket 
the plants. But finally the whole vast 
army of more than four millions of or- 
ganized workers in this country will be 
mobilized to win the strike, if that be 
necessary. And wdien the strike is won, 
no other industry will remain strong 
enough to make war against the trade- 
union movement with any hope of success. 

Unless all signs fail, this steel strike 
will be long and costly. Steel is funda- 
mental to all manufacturing industry, and 
there will be endless millions of dollars 
at the disposal of the steel trust, coming 
from the other employers that are stand- 
ing out a.gainst democracy in the shops. 
Xot only will the bosses employ every sort 
of intimidation, from machine guns to 
blackjacks, but they will try every sort of 
trickery to stam]5cde the men back ijito the 
plants. One trick is in evidence already — 
a campaign to discredit William Z. I'oster, 
who has been in general charge of the 
field organizers in the steel mills for the 
past year. Foster organized the workers 
in the stockyards and meat i)acking i)lants. 
The ])ackers hate him. 'I'he game is to 
represent him as a dangerous anarchist. 

Of course the junker press will im- 
mediately begin to curse the Committee 
to Organize the Steel Workers, because 
they refused to delay the strike until the 
President's special committee which is to 
meet here on October 6 should get a 
chance to deal with the steel industry as 
well as with the railroad industry and all 
other industries. 

But what right has anyone to expect 
the responsible executives of twenty-four 
of the international unions in the American 
Federation of Labor to give a vote of con- 
fidence in the future action toward labor's 
rights of the President's own selections 
for that October conference? Look them 
over. See who they are. The names of 
twenty-two men have been given out by 
. the President as being the citizens he has 
selected to speak for the "public" in this 
attempt to "])ut the wa.ge system upon a 
new footing." 

There is Judge Gary himself, the arch- 
enemy who is setting gunmen and thugs 
against the organized steel workers in 
order tcj i)erpetuate human slavery in the 
steel plants. 

There is Callaway of Georgia, leader of 
the National Association of Cotton Manu- 
facturers, whose organization has employed 
every vile and illegal means of keeping 
the children in the colton mills, and of 
kee]Mng the organizers of the Textile 
\\'orkers out. • 

There is John D. Rockefeller, Jr., who, 
just before the Ludlow massacre, sat un- 
ashamed before a committee of Congress 



for three hours and defended every act of 
his underlings in crushing out the revolt 
of the coal miners in Colorado. 

Or take Dr. Eliot, retired because of his 
age from the presidency of Harvard L'ni- 
versity. When he was already an old 
man he declared his belief that the real 
hero in American life \\as the strike- 
breaker. 

The Standard Oil Company has one ex- 
emi)loye and one recent lobbyist in this 
choice list. L. D. Sweet of Colorado, a big 
business man in the beet sugar and potato 
line, used to work for Standard Oil in 
New York City not so very long ago. 
Louis Titus of San Francisco and Oakland 
is known as an oil millionaire, real estate 
magnate and Washington lobbyist for 
Standard (^il. He represented Standard 
Oil and another oil compay, then under 
Federal indictment for grabbing naval oil 
lands, when he testified for the Phelan oil 
lands bill before a Senate committee here 
three years ago. 

So you may go do^vn the list. Barney 
Baruch, who won his millions as a Wall 
.'street gambler, has been, apparently, in 
charge of all arangements for the October 
conference, and will be one of its mem- 
bers. Jones of Chicago is an International 
Harvester Company magnate, while James 
of Memphis is likewise tied up with the 
steel and other interests that nest in \\'all 
Street. According to labor men here, the 
one big business man in the list who has 
.shown a sense of fairness and understand- 
ing in industrial affairs is Endicott, the 
shoe manufacturer, whose plants are lo- 
cated in Massachusetts and in Endicott, 
Xevv York. At least sixteen of the twenty- 
two chosen to speak for the "public" are 
of the old order that neither learns nor 
wants to learn anything of democracy. 

Wall Street is taking no more stock in 
the notion that any real gains for labor 
will come out of the October conference 
than the trade union leaders are. Any 
delay of strikes is welcomed by a group of 
big financiers that are afraid of what the 
after-war industrial unrest may lead to, 
but there is another and more i)owerful 
element in the Street that takes the tij) 
from Gary to "smash the unions now." 
This element is merely amused by the 
October conference ])lan. They are goin.g 
into the conference both as spokesmen of 
the business interests and of the "public," 
and while they kill time and wear down 
the patience of the labor spokesmen in dis- 
cussions of the right of men to belong to 
labor unions and to establish the eight 
hour day, these same conferees will be 
buying riot guns and barbed wire to ex- 
press their real views as to how the de- 
mands of organized labor should be met. 

However, the need for serious discus- 
sion of the best way of securing industrial 
democracy in this country is not going to 
be ignored by organized labor. A real 
conference on the future of the railroad 
industry, the coal industry, the steel in- 
dustry, the shipping industry and other 
basic industries will be held here under 
the auspices of the Conference on Demo- 
cratic Railroad Control, within a few 
weeks. I'rederic C. Howe is director of 
this conference, and while the Plumb ])]an 
fi)r democratic control of the railroads 
will come first on the ])rogram, Howe and 
his committee realize that the water trans- 



portation, the fuel and the steel industries 
must be taken up in any broad study of 
the railroad problem. Since the L'nited 
Mine W orkers have officially endorsed the 
Plumb plan for the railroad workers and 
a similar plan for the coal mining indus- 
try, and have formed a close alliance with 
the organized railroad workers, the issue 
which labor and the Nation must seriously 
consider is not whether industry shall be 
brought under democratic control, but 
what shall be the details of establishing 
democratic control. It is coming anyhow. 

In contrast with the sort of men whom 
Baruch has picked for the President's labor 
conference, to speak for the people of the 
United States as a whole, there are Gov- 
ernor Plenry J. Allen of Kansas, former 
Governor Dunne of Illinois and Folk of 
^lissouri, and Chief Justice Clark of the 
Supreme Court of North Carolina, taking 
part in the conference which is being ar- 
ranged by labor itself. There will be pub- 
lic utilities e.xperts and economists, such 
as Prof. E. W. Bemis of Columbia, Prof. 
Irving Fisher of Yale, and Morris L. Cook 
of I'hiladelphia. There will be no ])rofes- 
sional stockbrokers or i)lungers, nor men 
who have grown old in the belief that 
shooting and clubbing workmen is the 
best way to settle an industrial dispute. 

I'lehind all this noise of immediate bat- 
tle is one big fact that cheers the souls 
of labor organizers : the rank and file in 
the industries have discovered their power. 
They are going to use it, and not merely 
by strikes. They are organizing for eman- 
cipation, and like good Americans they see 
the power that rests in the ballot. They 
feel, for the first time, the advantage that 
would be theirs if they had a hundred 
Labor Party men in Congress, and two or 
three resolute and aggressive Labor Party 
men in the Cabinet. Illinois, North Da- 
kota, California, Washington and Minne- 
sota have thus far definitely declared, 
through State labor conferences of union 
delegates, for union with the organized far- 
mers in the coming political campaign. 
In half a dozen other States the same 
idea is near the point of becoming action. 

Arthur Henderson, leader of the British 
Labor Party, is to be in this country next 
month, to tell big mass meetings, of or- 
ganized labor what British labor has done 
for itself by using three weapons — the 
trade union, the Labor Party and the co- 
operative movement. All three organiza- 
tions make the fight of each. 



NOT WANTED BY WORKERS. 



The liishoi) of Birmingham, P^ngland. hit 
the nail on the head the other day when he 
wrote to the London Times : "What is wanted 
by the workers is that they should be frankly 
recognized as partners in the great indus- 
trial scheme. The day has gone by in which 
people were satisfied to live under even the 
most beneficial despotism." 

The Bishoj) declared that the workers 
should share with the employers "full infor- 
mation as to the state of the business for 
which they are working." Only by frank- 
mutual understanding, he held, can industry 
really prosper and yield the best results for 
all concerned. 

There is a .good suggestion in this for 
both employers and employes in the l'nited 
States. — J. G. Phelps Stokes. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



FOOL STRIKES. 

We frequently hear the statement, "No 
strike is ever lost." ^ 

There is a good deal of truth in this, 
for the workers always learn practical les- 
sons from a strike which they failed to win 
at the time. Even though the object for 
which the strike took place was not se- 
cured, the experience may have taught 
some valuable lessons. The fact is, how- 
ever, that there is such a thing as a "Fool" 
strike, and during recent months there 
have been several, both at home and 
abroad. 

A man who would invest his money in 
a business before having given thorough 
consideration to his chances for success, 
would be called a fool by some, and a 
body of workmen who decide to strike 
without having given sufificient thought to 
their prospects for winning", might very 
properly be said to have gone on a "Fool" 
strike. 

There is more than one reason why 
"Fool" strikes should be avoided. 

The "Fool" strike tends to impress the 
employer with the belief that, while strikes 
are costly to him, he need have no par- 
ticular fear of those who i)articipate in 
them, because their lack of generalship 
and ]:)ractical methods make a victory for 
the strikers almost impossible. 

The "Fool" strike also has the effect 
of alienating public support to a greater 
or lesser degree, and practical trade union- 
ists thoroughly understand the fact that 
one of the most valuable assets which 
trade-unionists and which strikers can 
have, is strong public support. 

A "Fool" strike also has this bad eft'ect 
upon the strikers: As a rule, many of 
them have not been members of their or- 
ganizations long enough to become thor- 
oughly informed as to the methods of 
trade-unionism. They organize to improve 
their condition. They strike because, in 
their o])inion, this will enable them to 
make more ra])id and satisfactory progress. 
When the strike fails many of them reach 
the conclusion that trade-unionism in itself 
may be all right, and that strikes are fre- 
quently won, but that in so far as they 
are concerned, peculiar conditions sur- 
rounding them make strikes and trade- 
unionism of little value. It is one of the 
most difficult tasks to reorganize such men. 

Some advocates of "Fool" strikes take 
much luore pleasure in playing to the gal- 
lery and stirring up bitterness of feeling 
towards eiui)loyers than in discussing the 
actual situation which the workers must 
deal with, so that men are frequently 
guided more by their feelings than by their 
reason. 

One of the best known and most suc- 
cessful trade-unionists said some time ago 
that when facing a serious industrial situa- 
tion, after all peaceful methods had failed, 
he would ask himself these ciuestions: 

"Would a strike to secure what we are 
demanding' be justified? If justified, what 
are our chances for success If the chances 
for success are not better than those of 
failure, then, though there would be every 
reason for striking, he would o]j])ose the 
strike, because an unsuccessful strike would 
l)lace the workers in a worse position than 
they were before." 

One of the strongest weapons which the 
trade-unionists have at their dis])osal, is 
the power to strike. Without it llic}- 



would have made but little progress. The 
proper application of this weapon is essen- 
tial on many occasions. An improper, un- 
wise application frequently does labor 
more damage than good. 

A "Fool" strike never accomplished any 
benefit except to teach a painful lesson. 
Frequently it has retarded for many years 
the steps which the workers had to take 
before they could improve their conditions 
as wage-earners. — International Molders 
Tournal. 



"THE FUTURE." 



(ireat Britain's Premier has addressed a 
message to the people through the medium 
of The huture, a national publication issued 
b\- ,\lr. Lloyd George's authority, which will 
be distributed free throughout the country. 
The message reads: 

"Millions of gallant young men have 
fought for the new world. Hundreds of 
thousands died to establish it. If we fail 
to honor the promise given them, we dis- 
honor ourselves. 

"What does the new world mean? What 
was the old world like? It was a world 
where toil for myriads of honest workers, 
men and women, purchased nothing better 
than squalor, penury, anxiety, wretchedness ; 
a world scarred by slums, disgraced by 
sweating, where unemployment, through the 
vicissitudes of industry, brought despair to 
multitudes of humble homes ; a world where, 
side by side with want, there was waste of 
thc' inexhaustible riches of the earth, partly 
through ignorance and want of forethought, 
jjartly through intrenched selfishness. 

"If we renew the lease of that world, we 
.shall betray the heroic dead. We shall be 
guilty of the basest perfidy that ever black- 
ened a i)eople's fame. Nay, we shall store 
up retribution for ourselves and our children. 

"The old world must and will come to an 
end. No effort can shore it up nnich longer. 
If there be any who feel inclined to main- 
tain it, let them beware lest it fall upon them 
and overwhelm them and their households in 
ruin. 

"Ft should be the subliiue duty of all, with- 
out thought of partisanship, to help in the 
building up of the new world, where labor 
shall have its just reward and indolence 
alone shall suffer want," 



FACTS ABOUT LUMBER. 



The tremendous draft that modern de- 
mands are making on the lumber resources 
of the world is indicated by the fact that on 
July 1. 1919, over 10,000 carloads of lum- 
ber remained unshipped on the Pacific Coast, 
of the United States. During the six months 
ending June 30, 1919, orders exceeded pro- 
duction on the Pacific Coast by 250,000,000 
feet, new business exceeded shipments by 
l.T.S.000,000 feet and shipments exceeded pro- 
duction l)y 100,000,000 feet— large foreign 
shipments going to South America, .\ustra- 
lia, the Ignited Kingdom, and other countries. 
This means that the great army of woodmen 
under the command of the world's commer- 
cial need is making a most effective on- 
slaught upon one of the great wooded areas 
of the New World. In this connection, how- 
ever, facts gathered from various sources 
indicate that the peoi)le of the far West arc 
ra])idly coming to take an interest in llie 
forestry situation. One of the first things 
that is apiiarently being learned by them is 



the fact that this is a world problem and 
that if it is to be properly solved, action must 
not only be prompt but comprehensive, tak- 
ing into consideration the lumber needs and 
demands of all countries. With all the great 
withdrawals of forest land by the Govern- 
ment, four-fifths of the lumber of the Pacific 
Coast is still in private hands. 



OUR FOREIGN TRADE. 



"America," said the noted statistician 
Hungerford, "will be for some time to come 
the su])i)ly market of the world. Of course, 
certain shipping disappointments are inevi- 
table, but let us hope that all these disap- 
])ointments turn out as satisfactorily as 
that of the Italian. Receiving a shipment 
of stoves from a Detroit firm, this Italian 
sent them the following letter: 

" 'Dear Sirs — I received de stoves which 
I by from you alright. But for why don't 
you send me no feet? Wat is de use of de 
stoves when he don't have no feet? I am 
loose me customer sure ting by not having 
feet and dats not very pleasant for me. 
AVat is de matter wit you? You lose me 
my trade and now I tell you dat you are 
a blein fool and no good. I send you back 
at wunce your stoves to moore, for sure 
because you are such a blem foolish peo- 
ple.s — your respectfulee, Giovanni Galli. P. 
S. — Since I rite his letter I find de feet in 
de hoxen so you need no send dem. Ex- 
cuse to me.' " 

Labor's Economic Platform 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18 Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or 
compartments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by ^ the 
hanking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



will dwarf, in power if not in funds, the 
gigantic Federation of British industries, with 
its capital of $20,000,000,000. 

"The new combination is organized to fight 
such organizations as the British Federation. 
In its international aspect the combined trade 
union and co-operative movements w^ill be the 
greatest enemy of 'big business' interests 
throughout the world. 

"In Britain alone the combined unions 
would include nearly three-quarters of the 
inhabitants. If the organizers have their 
way it w'ill be invincible in the industrial 
field. 

"It is estimated that after allowing for 
overlapping of membership the combined 
movements control 7,000,000 adult mem- 
bers. Close on 7,000,000 families would 
support the trust and each of these fami- 
lies would include on an average two adults 
and three children. 

"A joint advisory council of co-operators 
and trade unions has been constituted to 
draw up a plan of campaign for the new 
organization." 



He Falsified Records. 

The following charge is officially recorded 
against Representative Blanton, who has 
been repeatedly attacking the trade union 
on the floor of the House whenever an 
occasion permitted. At last his sins have 
found him out. It will be nice reading 
for his constituents when he seeks election 
as Governor of the great State of Texas, 
as reports indicate he aspires to. The in- 
cident as reported in a local paper, readr^ : 

"The House ruled that Representative 
Blanton, of Texas, had falsified the record 
of the House by writing into the steno- 
graphic transcript of the proceedings cer- 
tain remarks which were not made. '^I'hc 
House passed a resolution, offered by Rep- 
resentative Wingo, Democrat, of Arkansas, 
condemning 'falsification of the records of 
its i)roceedings,' and ordered expurgation of 
a statement inserted in the record by Mr. 
Blanton attacking Representative Dewalt." 



Country Must Face Most Serious Crisis. 

Although labor conditions in the State 
of Utah are about as normal as anywhere 
in the United States, Governor Bamberger, 
a leading banker and cojjper comi)any di- 
rector, declared in talking to an Eastern 
newspaper correspondent, that this State 
was surrounded by an angry sea of un- 
rest. 

"We are facing the most serious crisis 
in. this country since the Civil War," said 
the banker. "Although there are no ex- 
tensive strikes in Utah, the general spirit 
of unrest thoughout the country reaches 
here. It is like an epidemic. It spreads 
like the influenza. 

"The great trouble is that the people 
who can and ought to take the lead in 
solving our industrial problems are the 
most unreasonable. There are ten or 
twelve millionaires in Salt Lake City who 
cannot see their own .faults and who are 
always complaining about strikes and labor 
unrest. They are the worst ofifenders in 
the United States. 

"They create the radicals because they 
begrudge the poor man a living wage. I 
have been the owner of a railroad for 



thirty years and I have never had a strike. 
I have never had the slightest fear that 
anything would happen. 

"My own exi)erience shows that if you 
treat the people right there will be no 
trouble. Now what we need in this coun- 
try is for capital and labor to get better 
acpuainted. We should talk to each other, 
exchange ideas and take time for each 
other socially. There has been too much 
of a spirit of every man for himself; too 
much independence. 

".\s far as Utah is concerned we are 
not at all apprehensive, but we cannot 
shut ourselves off from the rest of the 
world. I must say that most of our mine 
operators and employers have been liberal 
and far-sighted, but there are a dozen 
worthless millionaires here, who own city- 
property, live oflf of their community. They 
do not see the handwriting on the wall. 
They do not know that the action of the 
king of Italy in giving up the crown lands 
to the people is significant of our times. 
They will not see it until it is too late 
for them. But these worthless dogs here 
have a lot to learn. Co-operation and not 
oppression is the spirit of our age." 



For Government Ownership. 

George P. Hampton, managing director 
of the Farmers' National Council, has is- 
sued a statement, in which he pointed out 
the economic dangers which the council 
sees looming up ahead unless the princi- 
ple of government owner.ship be recog- 
nized. In his statement Mr. Flampton 
said : 

"Jt is most unfortunate that st)me farm 
leaders have seized upon the present situ- 
ation to attack labor as responsible for the 
high cost of living. The great economic 
causes of the high cost of living must be 
eliminated to improve the economic confli- 
tion of both farm and city labor. We 
must have Government ownership of the 
natural resources with democratic opera- 
tion, the i)roducts to be sold at cost. 

"The American farmer has been mulcted 
under private ownership of the railroads 
and of shipping. Neither railroad freight 
rates nor ocean freight rates can be re- 
duced if the railroads are returned to pri- 
vate owners and we sell the ships built 
with our money under the plans being 
considered by Congress to-day." 



MEANING OF "HALLIGEN." 



The world at large has. naturally enough, 
heard little or nothing of the so-called "halli- 
gen," or small mounds not far from Heligo- 
land, until its present interest in that part of 
the world led to a description of them. An 
odd place to live — for at high water the 
buildings stand apparently on the surface of 
the sea : in summer, however, one might see 
some stretches of pasture land with cattle, 
for there are several months when the "hal- 
ligen" are not so completely overflowed and 
the cattle can go out to pasture. During the 
rest of the year at high tide people and live- 
stock must stay in buildings on the highest 
parts of the mounds, each perched on its 
own "hallig." Back in the first half of the 
seventeenth centur}^ there was a prosperous 
island province, Xordstrand, off the coast of 
Schleswig-Holstein. and of this island noth- 
ing was left by a great and catastro]jhic 
storm except some smaller islands, aiid here 



and there a mound rising above the ocean. 
Then by degrees Frisians came from Hol- 
land^and built their cottages on the mounds, 
which they called "halligen," and made a 
living collecting the eggs of wild fowl and 
digging for oysters at low water in the sur- 
rounding nuid flats. Wild geese, ducks, wid- 
geon, and teal flocked to the sand dunes "and 
created an industry both for islanders and 
hallig-dwellers. In time two of the islands 
had become exclusively Danish, two German, 
and the rest, including the "halligen," Fris- 
ian. Oland. the largest "hallig," has trees 
and a church ; but the other "halligen" are 
treeless, and without fresh water, except as 
it is stored from the rains. Always the build- 
ings that seem to rest on the ocean are in 
danger of being swept away, but even in that 
event the dweller on a "hallig" has come back 
and rebuilt his cottage. 



THE DOMINION OF LABOR 
(Continued from Page 2.) 



again when conditions change. Monopoly 
could in the past impose serious hardships on 
the public with little personal suffering to 
itself. When labor strikes, it has to bear 
its share of the loss and inconveniencg that 
it imposes on the community. The employer 
usually is rich enough to avoid personal dis- 
comfort — and this makes a great difference. 

On one occasion, when the exactions of 
Irish landowners had driven their tenants 
into revolt, and a land war with agrarian 
outrages had begun, a noble lord entered his 
club in London, and seeing a brother peer, 
remarked. "I see by the paper that those fel- 
lows have been shooting at my agent again. 
If they think that they can intimidate me by 
shooting my agent they are very much mis- 
taken." 

The dominion of labor will be long or 
short, according to the effort it makes to do 
justice rather than .seek self-interest: for the 
highest self-interest consists in doing justice 
to all. It must be just even to those to 
whom it does not wish to be just — even to 
its oppressors of the past and present. Can 
it rise to the height of such a vision? No 
body of men in the past possessing great 
power has even approached it ; hence revolu- 
tion has trodden on the heels of revolution. — 
The Public. 



CONDITIONS IN GREAT BRITAIN. 
(Continued from Page 7.) 



men have left to perish. Every man and 
woman and child in Britain will have to pay 
for the past and current week's follies, and the 
poorest will pay most, because they will pay in 
actual suffering, while the well-paid will only 
incur the disadvantages of straitened circum- 
stances. 

It is up to the individual to study for himself 
the economic situation and to act accordingly. 
He must learn to appreciate for himself the 
significance of imports £1,319,338,591, and ex- 
ports £498,473,065. In effect this means that 
as a nation we are spending one shilling and 
three halfpence and earning a little less than 
fivepencc. Our re-exports, too, have fallen 
from £111,737,691 in 1912, to £3r,956.029 in 
1918. And that in spite of existing inflated 
values. 

These figures are like the pulse of the na- 
tional life. They indicate grave derangements 
and almost certain catastrophe. 

The State is often described as a ship. To- 
day the ship is on a lee shore, and all hands 
must work at maximum speed if she is to be 
saved from utter wreck. 



As a rule, birds do not fly at a greater 
height than 1000 feet. Eagles have been 
known to fly to a height of 6000 feet. A 
lark will rise to the same height, and so will 
crows. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



HARBORS OF THE FUTURE. 



The ship of the future is waiting for its 
harbor. No engineering' problems of its 
own construction retard its development, but 
the fact that it has already grown to its 
harbor limits. We must have bigger ter- 
minal facilities if we are to have bigger 
ships. In England it is now proposed to 
provide harbors for 1,000-foot liners, and 
the plan to build such liners here and dock 
them at Montauk Point is already familiar 
through the daily press. In Britain the plans 
have reached a definite proposal to improve 
the port of Falmouth so as to provide, it is 
claimed, a safer and quicker route for ocean 
passengers and mails to and from London 
and the continent than any now available. 
According to the British promoters, Fal- 
mouth is to be made "a port of empire," and 
the scheme is regarded as one of imperial 
importance. That we ought to consider 
seriously some plan of this kind in the 
United States is evidently the opinion of 
the editor of The Scientific American, who 
says : 

"The limit of size in steamships is not 
determined by any structural difficulties in 
the ship itself. Shii)s of from 600 to 1.000 
feet in length would have made their ap- 
pearance many years earlier than they did 
if it had been a question of the ability of 
the great shipbuilding firms to construct such 
.ships. The limitations on size have been 
those imposed by nature, such as the depth 
of the entrance channels to harbors or their 
width as afifecting the .safe flow of traffic. 
Also in such conditions as obtain in the 
Hudson river. New York, the length of the 
ships and piers at which they lie is re- 
stricted by the necessity for preserving a 
sufficiently wide channel between the pier- 
head lines on opposite sides of the river." 

The Falmouth plan is set forth in an 
earlier issue of the same paper, as follows, 
by Eric A. Dime, who says : 

"According to Sir A. Booth, of the Cunard 
Company, the purely cargo steamer in the 
North American trade is passing. He ex- 
pressed his belief recently that the Atlantic 
transport trade of the future lies with the 
40,000 to 50,000 ton steamer carrying freight, 
passengers, and mail, and if he be right in 
his belief, the cargo business of the future 
will necessarily go to the ports where mam- 
moth passenger and cargo steamers can be 
properly accommodated. LTnder present con- 
ditions our largest steamships are unable to 
enter or leave Southampton, Liverpool, or 
London, except when the tides are favor- 
able on the bars and in the channels. They 
can only enter Liverpool during twelve hours 
out of the twenty- four, and they can only 
go into dock there when their time in port 
more or less coincides with the period of 
spring tides. There is no port in the United 
Kingdom possessing suitable dock accom- 
modation which large steamships like the 
following can enter or leave in all states of 
tide and weather: 'Britannic.' 50,000 tons, 
900 feet: 'Aquitania,' 50,000 tons, 885 feet; 
'Olympic,' 45,000 tons, 882 feet: 'Maureta- 
nia,' 32,000 tons, 790 feet. 

"The ])rincipal ports of England, the ma- 
jority of which arc approached by long and 
shallow channels, were more or less con- 
venient for shipping in the jiast, but the 
heavy expenditure necessary to rulapl them 
to the requirements of modern shi])ping 
makes their continued use uneconomical. 



They retard the progress of shipbuilding and 
would handicap British shipowners and mer- 
chants in competition with their foreign 
rivals. 

"Shipping authorities in England have 
agreed that St. Just, in Falmouth harbor, 
would make the most ideal deep-water port. 
It is situated on the eastern shore of the 
harbor, which is the nearest deep-water har- 
bor to the entrance of the English channel 
from the Atlantic. St. Just is easily accessi- 
ble and landlocked, and vessels of any draft 
or size can safely enter and leave it in any 
state of the tide. There is no bar, silting, 
or scouring, and little strength of tide. The 
harbor offers a direct and safe approach 
from the ocean and shelter. Owing to nat- 
ural advantages the accommodation required 
for the modern great vessels could be con- 
structed there at a comparatively small cost, 
while at the same time the advantages of the 
site are eciually favorable for the construc- 
tion of the necessary adjuncts of a harbor 
and docks of the first class. 

"Docks erected at St. Just would be in 
the most favorable position for the econom- 
ical and expeditious distribution and collec- 
tion of goods carried by the liners. These 
goods could be conveyed at cheap rates by 
an organized system of coasting steamers to 
and from St. Just and London, Hull, New- 
castle, Bristol, Liverpool, Manchester, Glas- 
gow, Dublin, Belfast, and other places which 
are near to great centers of consumption and 
production, and also to and from the conti- 
nental ports. This systematized co-opera- 
tion on a large scale of the ocean and coast- 
ing trades would be merely a development 
of what is already being done from the ports 
now being used by the liners, but the prin- 
ciple has not been, and indeed cannot be, 
carried far enough in consequence of the 
natural disadvantages of those ports and the 
great increa.se of size of the modern steam- 
ships." 



WHAT IS A FRIEND? 



What is a friend? T will tell you. It is 
a person with whom you dare to be your- 
self. Your soul can go naked with him. 
He seems to ask of you to put on nothing, 
only to be what you are. He does not want 
you to be better or worse. When you are 
with him you feel as a prisoner feels who 
has been declared innocent. You do not 
have to be on your guard. You can say 
what you think, so long as it is genuinely 
you. He understands those contradictions 
in your nature that lead others to misjudge 
you. With him you breathe free. You can 
take off your coat and loosen your collar. 
You can avow your little vanities and en- 
vies, and hates and vicious sparks, your 
meanness and absurdities, and in opening 
them up to him they are lost, dissolved on 
the white ocean of his loyalty. He under- 
stands. You do not have to be careful. You 
can abuse him, neglect him, tolerate him. 
Best of all, you can keep still with him. It 
makes no matter. He likes you. He is 
like fire, that purifies all you do. He is like 
water, that cleanses all you say. He is like 
wine, that warms you to the bone. He un- 
derstands, he understands. You can weep 
with him, laugh with him, sin with him, 
l)ray with him. Through and underneath it 
all he sees, knows, and loves you. A friend, 
I repeat, is one with whom you dare to be 
vourself. — Selected. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Pa«* t.) 
LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone, Seneca 48. 

THOS. CONWAY, Secretarj-. 

ED HICKS, Treasurer. 

Branches: 

ASHTABCLA HARBOR, Ohio 74 Bridge Street 

Phone, 428-W. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 332 Banks Avenue 

Phone, Broad 131. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 9214 Harbor Avenue 

Phone, S. C. 1599. 

TOLEDO, Ohio 704 Summit Street 

Phone, Main 4519. 

CLEVEL.AND, Ohio 1012 Superior Avenue 

Phone, Main 866. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone, South 598. 

DETROIT, Michigan 44 Shelby Street 

Phone, Cadillac 543. 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Ave. 

Phone, Central 8460. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 122y2 Main Street 

Phone, 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Streei 

Telephone Seneca 896. 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary. 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 406 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 85 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, III 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 704 Summit Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

Relief Stations: 
Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Puluth, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. Milwaukee. Wis. 

Green Bay, Wis. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Ludington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo. O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 69 Clay Streei 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 28* 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% 3rd Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILER8 AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 58 Commercial StreM 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 64 Pike St. Viaduct. P. O. Box 876 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal... 613 Beacon Street. P. O. Box 67« 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTIJC, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 
SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box B4 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC, 

Headquarters. 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C). Canada P. O. Box 9«« 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

PETERSBURG Alasks 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 181 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION. 

PAN FRANCISCO Cal 9 Mission Street 

Pliniic SuttPr 220.'') 



MARINE FIREMEN'S AND OILERS' UNION OF 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

VANCOTTVER. B. C 329 Columbia Av«nue 

VICTORIA. B. C 1424 Government Street 



B. C. COAST STEWARDS. 
VANCOUVBJR, B. C il> Rlchsrde Rtrset 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News 



At the convention of the Colorado 
State Federation of labor the dele- 
gates came down hard on the gentry 
who ignore trade union laws. The 
convention unanimously declared 
where the preliminaries of a strike 
do not include observance of tlie 
union's laws no support by the 
State body will be forthcominsj. 

An agreement has been reached 
between the Plumbers' Union, of 
Vancouver, B. C, and their employ- 
ers which carries with it an increase 
in wages of $1.20 per day, with 
double time for overtime. The union 
shop, which was lost during the re 
cent strike, has been regained. These 
improvements will give the plumb- 
ers of Vancouver a wage of $7.20 
for an eight-hour day. 

Snowball Miners' Union No. 124, 
of Oatman, Ariz., has secured an ad- 
justment of its grievances with the 
mining companies in this district. 
The companies have granted the 
wages asked by the Snowball Min- 
ers' Union, affiliated with the Mine, 
Mill and Smelter Workers, and the 
mines are reopening. The advance 
secured is 50 cents per day and no 
reductions to be made in wages with- 
out 30 days' notice. This establishes 
a scale of $6 per day for miners 
and timbermen and $5.50 for muck- 
ers and trammers. 

Retroactive wages due the machine 
shop employees of the Bethlehem 
Steel Company's plant in Bethle- 
hem, Pa., for the period from August 
1, 1918, to March 1, 1919, as a result 
of a wage arbitration award made 
by the Wage Labor Board, will total 
between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000. 
Approximately 9000 machine shop 
workers, who will benefit by the 
award, have been laid off since the 
armistice was signed and all for- 
mer employees of the plant have 
been urged to send their names and 
addresses to the Machinists' Union 
in Allentown, Pa., in order that their 
claims may be settled. 

The strike of actors and actresses 
has been adjusted. Agreements have 
been reached that will insure better 
protection and eliminate many of the 
grievances that existed in the pro- 
fession for years and were continu- 
ally getting worse. All the theatres 
have been opened and the Actors' 
Equity Association has certainly 
made good in its first effort to ele- 
vate, the standing of its members. 
The- association is not unniindfnl of 
the great assistance rendered by the 
other unions employed in and around 
the theatres. The adjustment of 
the trouble in this city has also re- 
sulted in the actors in other cities 
affected resuming cordial relations 
with the managers. 

Secretary-Treasurer John Norland, 
of the Timber Workers' Union, re- 
ports the following new unions: In 
the States of Wisconsin, Michigan and 
Minnesota the work of organization 
is going on rapidly. One organizer 
in Michigan signed 2,300 members in 
three weeks. During the past two 
weeks five new locals have been in- 
stalled there. In Wisconsin during 
the same time six new locals have 
been installed. At Odannah, Wis., 
about 200 Indians joinefl their new 
local. Locals were also installed at 
St. Helen's, Oregon; Ft. Francis, 
Ontario, Canada; Rio Dell, Calif., 
Prescott, Oregon, and at Hoquiam, 
Washington. At present there are 
over 147 locals affiliated with the In- 
ternational Timber Workers' Union, 



OfDca Phone Elliott 1196 



RfltAbllshed 1896 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Date Methods In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

COMPASSES AUJUSTKU 

712-13-14 SEABOARD BLDG. FOURTH and PIKE STREETS 

SEATTLE. WASH. 



MO 1^ F I? ^ See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
^-' IV XL rv O box in which you are served. 

Is&ued by Au\hoiHyoi the Cigar Makers Inicrnat jnal Union of Amenci 

Union-made Cigars. 

tZhi^ CnlififS "w *^« cio^rt c.y<c«.f.r4 ••'•'•.% Du> r^** tMM ''^•<>t by« Fid-Clcs WorttMK 

«iincriDrni ot thr MORjk MATlAiAund iNiuiiCluA; M[il4Rt 0' T>ir CFlAfL TtawHgnj m* i tnrnnmr .i 
USM Ciiun 10 «>■ Wkari tfirOMt\o\r iht worU {I 



•^ }f: ^Q^-^tUiui, nrndtrl 
*' C Hf / LUf 



Seattle, Wash , Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postotllce, letters audreased In care of 
the aallors' Union AKency at Seattle can 
not De held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call wr nave their mail forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mail until arrived. 

Aase, Olaf Anderson, Sextes 

Abrahamson, Helttati^Vndersson, Gustav 
Abolin, K. Andersen Alf. -163S 

Abrahamson, John Anderson, Albert 
Anderson John (6) Andersen, Olaf -2099 
Adams, A. D. Andersen, Herman 

Anderson Adolf (4) Anderson, John N. 
Anderson Harry (2) Anderson, Julius 
Anderson, Chris Andewig, H. 
Anderson, John -ISOOAntonsen, Martin(3) 
Andresen, Jorgen Alcerstrom, O. R. 
Anderson, Albert Antonsen, Anton G. 

H. (2) Alquist, Cris 

Anderson, Charles Alexis, H. 
Andersson W. (2) Aspengreen, E. 
Anderson Rasmus 



Bang, Osltar 
Backlund, K. 
Bacltman, Axel 
Backslrom. F. 
Belmont, Joe 
Berg, Wm. 
Beversdorf, E. 



Bjorkstrom, A. 
Bloomgren, Adolf 
Bodie, Wm. 
Boyle, James E. 
Bolstad, Alf. 
Borgan, Arne 
Brown, Calvin H. 



I Bertleson, Bertie J. Bratson, Jos. 
Bergkvest, Axel Bruce, Albert 

Berentsen, A. M. Brun, Dick 
Berkland, Hans J. Burgiss, J. "W. 
Bibbs, Golden S. Bund, Nils 
Bjorseth, K. 



Campbell, John 
Camino, C. C. 
Carlson, Herbert 
Carlsen, Gust. 
Carlin, Carl A. 
Cartveit, C. C. 
Carlson, Gus. 



Burggraf, Albert 
Carlson, C. A. 
Carlson, Chas. H. 
Carlson, Gunner 
Carstensen, Carsten 
Casperson, Carl 
Carruthers, M. 
Clausen, Christ. 



Carlson, Oscar -454 Corron, George R. 
Carlson, John -1586 Cochrane, Robt. 
Carlson. Ingwald Cortes, P. 



Dahl, Die 



Ditmanson, 



Davies, Chester O. Dreyer, J. 



Davies, E. R. 
Delaney, John 
Dehler, J. 
Dekker, D. 
Enoksen, A. 
Eliassen, H. O. 
Elstad, John 
KIze, Carl 
Ellis, J. 
Elllng, Alfred 
Forevaag, C. 
Fair, Phaltl 
Feedge J. A. 
Ferguson, Robt. 
Felsch. C. 
Flatten, James G. 
Flemming, M. 
Gabrielsen, P. 
Gamber, J. J. 
Gerson, Chas. 
Gibler, Karl 
Hanson, Olaf 
Hanson, Andrew 
Hansen, John P. 
j Hanson, Josef 
Hanson, Peter 
Hanson, G. E. 
Hanson, John 
Halley, Wm. 
Haraldson. Johan 
Halseth, Ed. 
Inglebretsen, Olaf 
Iverson, Andrew 
Jacobson, Johan 
Janson, E. A. 
Jansen, Emil 
Jensen, Nils 
Jensen, Henry 
Jensen, Hans 
Johnson, A. W. 
Johansen, Ed. 
Johnsen, Jacob 
Johansen, J. 



Dunwoody. George 
Douglas, W. 
Dunn, W. G. 
Dutton, H. 
Elisen, Sam 
Evsner, Ingvar 
Erikson, Erik 
Erikson, Otto 
Erickson, K. 
Erickson, J. R. 
Fox, Andrew 
Folks, H. 
Fuve, A. M. 
Fuidge, E. W. 
Franson, O. 
Fredrecksen, F. 

Groth, Karl 
Grunbock, John 
Gusjoos, O. 
Gustafsson, O. 
Hasselborg, Gus. 
Henrekson, E. 
Hendreckson, H. 
Hoik, Geo. 
Holmquist, Einor 
Holland, J. 
Hill, F. 

Hilliard, C. R. 
Hunter, G. H. 

Isakson, Karl 
Iverson, Ole 
Johnson, E. 
Johnson, Peter -2313 
Johnsen, A. 
Johanson, Jakob 
Johnson, G. 
Johnstone, Walter 
Johansen, Karl 
Johnsen, John 
Johnsen, Adler -2565 
.Tohanssen, Erik 



Johnson, Peter M. Johnson, P. 
Johansen, Karl -2127 



Karlstrand, G. 
KastI, H. 
KarUson, K. 
Karlsen, O. 
Korsama, N. J. 
Kalllo, F. 
Karlsen, E. 
Kempson, M. 
Larsen, HJalmer 
Larsen, Segurd 
Larsen, G. 
Lampi, F. 
Larsen, Alex 
Larsen, C. A. 
Larson, E. G. 
Larson, Fred 
Lee. C. 
Leskenen, F. 



Kines, J. H. 
Knudson, A. J 
Koppen, O. 
Kother. H. 
Koppen. B. 
Kristiansen, J. 
Karhanan. E. 
Kutin, John 
Leeuwen, A 
Lui, T. 
Leeravacg. H. 
LIdston, C. 
Lorgeman, F. 
Lund, Wm. 
Luetter, T. 
Lundberg, E. 
Lundgren, C 
Ludersson. W. 



V. 



Mortensen, K. A. 
Mathesen, Segurd 
Mortensen, H. 
Martindale, John 
Mardinsen, C. 
Malmqvist, C. 
Manus, Johanus 
Mordison, A. 
Malone, B. 
Mercer, H. 
Meckelson, J. 
Melby, V. 
Meloen, Harry 
Melder, Albert 
Meskelsson, Erik 
Mikkelsen, K. -10 
Nelson, Emil 
Nelson, Carl 
Nelson, A. C. 
Nelson, A. W. 
Nelson, John 
Nelson, Robert 
Olsen, Chris -13" 
Olsen, Nic 
Olsen, Albert 
Olson, Adolph 
Olsen, Ferdinand 
Olnes, Laurits 
Olsen, Arne 
Olsen, Robert 
Pakki, Emil 
Paaso. A. 
Paterson, P. 
Paklesen, K. 
Permin, Jens C. 
Pederson, E. P. 
Petterson, Adolf 
Pederson, Carl 
Pestoft, S. 
Peterson, Karl E. 
Rasmussen, Christ 
Rantenen, H. 
Reenhold, Gustov 
Robenson, W. N. 
Rosenberg, Adolf 
Sandberg, Otto 
Sandel, F. S. 
Sather, H. 
Sassi, W. 
Schmidt, W. 
Schuur, H. 
Seppala, Emil 
Seyfrled, M. 
Shoberg, J. 
Simmons, John 
Smith. Emil 
Sodwick, Bon 
Sorenson, H. 
Solberg, Olaf 
Taice, John J. 
Tapper, A. E. 
Tessa hia, B. 
Tliorsen, Herman 
Thammeson, Ole 
Thorspn, Hans 
Thorsen, Victor 
Uhlnes, F. 
Vesgood, Jena 
Ward, D. 
Waggoner, Sam 
Walters, Al 
Walters, Ted 
Watt, John B. 
Weld, L. A. 
West, J. N. 
Winter, Theodore 



Miller, Frank 

Miller, A. M. 

Morrison, J. V>. 

Morken, M. L. 

Moore, J. 

Morrison, Wm. 

Morgan, Wm. 

Moor, Thos. 

Moen, Robt. 

MaoKay, James 

McGuire, T. 

McKenzie, D. J. 

Mi-Oiiire, J. 

Maclvay, Thos. 

McGregor, J. 
lOMcCoy, James 

Neilsen, Axel 

Noren, B. 

Nord, C. W. 

Nilsen, Andreas 

Nilsen, Hans L. 

Nimen, August 
D Olsen, Hans 

Olsson, C. 

Olsen, Carl 

Olson, John 

Otterspear, Wm. 

Overland, Oskar 

O'Keefe, T. F. 

Pearson, Gustov 
Pederson, John 
Pettersen, Bjorne 
Pedersen, Karl 
Pelta, Henry 
Peterson, Ole 
Plant iko, W. 
Powell, H. 
Porter, A. 
Funis, A. 
Rosenthal, W. 
Rohman, G. 
Rosenblad, Albin 
Rund, Nils 

Sorenson, Tom 
Sorger, E. 
Strand, Alfred 
Stentz, P. 
Steffenson, S. 
St. Clair, Thomas 
Stratton, M. 
Suominen, F. 
Sundby, Alfred 
Sverdrup, Thorwnki 
Svendson, John A. 
Swanson, Wm. 
Syversen, Oskar 

Thorn. Arvid 
Tonneson, Anton 
Tomquist, Henry 
Troverson, Louis 
Tyrrell, J. 
Tuorilla, J. 



Voldby, P. 
Wilson, Gus 
Wilson, C. 
Withberg, Alf 
Williams, Lloyd 
Wilhelmsen, Martin 
Wirta, Geo. 
Wullum, J. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 



\nderson. Andrew 
Andersen. Olaf 
Barrot, G. 
Brandt, Arv. 
Burmelster. T. 
Rrun, Mattia 
Brant. Max 
Brandt, H. 
Carlson. Osc. 
Cormaok, W. C. 
Dischler, P. 
Gomes. M G. 
Hedrick. .Tack 
Jansson, Jolin 
Jansson, .T. A. 
Jensen, Joe 
Johanssen, John F. 
.lohannessen. Alf. 
.lohannessen. Jonas 
Johnson. Hilmar 
Khamp, S. 
KInnunen. Anttl 
ifonned" .T p 
Lutke. F. C. A. 
Malkoff. Peter 
MalmbPrg, E. 
Martinson, .\ilolph 



Melners. Herman 
Miller, F. W. 
Miller, Walter 
Murk, Chas. 

Nystrom. R. 
Olesen. W. 
Ol.son. A. 
Olson, W. 
Olsen. Alf 
Patterson, E. G. 
Pedersen, N B 
Petersen, Axel 
Rahlf, J. 
RIsenlus. Sven 
Rosenblad. n<tto 
Ruliins, C. A. 
.«mvth. J. B. 
Sodfrlnnd. Uno 
Stalt, Axel 
Stanbeck, A. 
Svenson. B. 
Sundqulst. Walter W 
Torln. Gustaf A. 
Valfors. Arvld 
Williams, T. C. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



L. M. Lindross, formerly on 
schooner "Commerce," is requested 
to call at the office of the V. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, S.m Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 9-10-19 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER & HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STOKES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and Flr«t 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pin* 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Creamatory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 

Four years Asslstanl Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound L'lslrlct. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical Collegs. 
Room 4140 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH, 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hata 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

tlS-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Poi< 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



WESTENHAVER BROS. 

CUT-RATE STORE 

$5.00 Less on a Suit or Overcoat, 
Shirts. Shoes, Oil Skins, Rubber Boots, 
Overalls, Underwear, Sox. Pants. 

We make a special effort to carry 
in stock everything for 

SAILORS and MILL MEN 

UNION STORE 

208 East Heron St., - Aberdeen 
Between Hex and Wear Theaters 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCX OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS. 

SHOES, COLLARS, SL'SPENUERa, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS. SHIRT* 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - Aber<J««n 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders Taken ior Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F. Sts., Aberdeen, Wash. 
1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 2«3 

**01e and Charley" 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors' Rest" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 




Poverty 
is A Crime! 

IT ign't a crime to be poor, any more 
than it is to be murdered. The poverl: - 
Btricken man is not a criminal. Ko 
!a a victim of a crime for which others 
aa well as himself are responiible. Henry 
George 33 years aero save a lecture be- 
fore the Knights of Labor the title of 
which wag 

"The Crime of Poverty'' 

It has Bince become a classic and hna 
touched the spark of ambition in the 
liearta of thousands of men and inspired 
them to better things. 
You can get a copy of this gripping lec- 
ture, well printed in a neat, cloth-bound 
book, and THE PUBLIC, A Journal of 
Democracy, for 13 weeks for only 63 
cents. Let THE PUBLIC be your in- 
terpreter, aa it is for many of the great 
liberal thinkers of the day: Brand Whifc- 
lock, U. S. Minister to Belgium; Wm. 
C Colvcr, Federal Trade Commissioner; 
Bay Standard Baker, and hundreds oC 
othera. 

Frank P. Walsh, Joint-Chair- 
man of the National War Labor 
Board says: 

Every worker in America should 
be a subscriber to THE PUBLIC. 
All lovers of justice are striving 
toward the same end. THE PUB- 
LIC points the way. 
Write your name and address clearly on 
the margin, attach 65 cents, stamps or 
money order, and with the first number 
of THE PUBLIC we will aend you a 
cloth-bonnd and handsomely printed 
copy of "The Crime of Poverty," 

THE PUBLIC 

122 E. 37th St., New York City 



Portland, Or., Letter List 



Amundsen, Ben 
Anderson, Albert 
Anderson. C. 
Ahren, Wm. J. 
Backman. Peter W. 
Bieler. B. 
Bohm, Franz 
Boyle, H. 

Christensen, B. H. 
Chrlstenaen, H. P. 
Cunningham, G. F. 
Pahl, Louis 
De Lonpr. K. 
Duret, J. E. 
Ellegaard, M. 
Elliot, Austin A. 
Erickson, John E. 
Guildersen. W. I£. 
Geiger, Joe 
Graaf, John D 
Hanson, August 

-1134 
Harding. Ellis 
Hartman. Fritz 
Hauachild. B. 
Heino. Gust. 
Hellman, H. W. 
Henriksen. Geo. 
Herman, David 
Hiokey, E. J. 
Hogstrom. Karl I. 
Holmes. George 
Huber, C. L. 
Johansson, Charles 

-2407 
.Torgenson, Earl 
Jensen, H. T. 
.Tohnson, C A. 
Jordan, H. S, 
Kasp. A. 
Knofskv. E. W. 
Kristiansen, Wm. A. 
Tyaatzen. Hugo 
Larsen, C. J. 



Laraen, Hans 
Larson, C. -1632 
Learcli, Paul 
Lesltinen, F. 
Matson, Hemming A 
Matson, H. -1808 
Melgant, F. 
Mirhaels. R. 
Miller, Victor 
Miller, Harry 
Mlkkelsen. Han-v 
Murphv. Franrls T>eo 
Newkirk, Clifford 
Nordman, Alek 
Nielsen. Jens 
Nllsen, Chas. 
Nelson, Harry 
Oe-'lvlB. Wm. A 
Ohlson, J. A. 
Olson, John 
Olson, Chas. 
Paulsson, Herman 
Petersen. Anton 

-1675 
Petesen, Knut 
Petter, G. 
Rensmand. Robert 
Ross, Geo. 
Rutsgaa'-d, Soren 
Ruud, Ole H. 
Rytko. Otto 
Samuel.sen. S 
Schmeltning, Max M. 
Schroder, August 
Srhultz. F. E. 
Sibley, Milton 
Slebert. Gust 
.Steenson. Edward 
Swenson. C. E 
Thnresen. Ingwa'd 
Tiihlrqrion .Tohan .T 
■WTold. Frank 
Wood, E. E. 



San Pedro Letter List 

Amesen, Frank Leisener, A. 

Anderson, P. A. Linden, M. 

-1695 IJndholm, Chas. 

Anderson. Sven Lindstrom, J. A. 

Andree, B. A. Ljunggren, Albin 

Billington, I. A. Lonngren, Carl 

Bergh, B. Magnusen, Karl 

Brandes, W. M. Malmberg. Ellis 

Breien. Hans Martin, George 

Cr>rregsona. Vincent Mathis, Hartley 

navis. Orville Matsen, Hemming 

Deneen, Frank A. Meyer, Claus 

Edmonds, Jack Monterro. John 

Ellingsen, Wm. Nelson, Chas. R. 

Enimorz, A., Nielsen, S. 

Evensen, Ed. Ole, Olesen 

Exlesan, Herman Olin, Emil 

Falvig, John Olsen, Martin 

Fisher, W. -707 Osterhaff, Henry 

Foike, Harry Pedersen, Halvcr 

Frank, Paul Petersen, Hugo 

Franzell, A. H. Raaum, Henry 

Ganser, Joe Rasmussen, S. A. 

Grassen, Van Roith, C. 

Gregory. Joe Repson, Ed. 

Gunderson, B. C. Roed, H. 

Gunnerud Torvald Roed, L. A. 

Hansen. Olaf Rosenblad. Billy 

Hansen, Bernard Ross. Wm. 

Hansen, John Sainson, T,niiis 

Hansen, Johan Sanders. Chn«. 

Artur Schmitd. Louis 

Hansen, Chas. L. Sheild, Oscnr 

Heoshc, Henry Sindblom, Ernest W. 

Hill. Fred A. Skogberg. J. 

Holmes, Frank Smebnrg. Olaf B 

TTuhner, Carl F. Snai-borg. Charles 

Johnnsen, Cnrl Sternberg, Alf. 

Johansen, Anton A. Stcnroos. A. W. 

.Johnson, Matt Stone. Victor 
Johnson. L. T. -483Strom, C. L. 

Johannson, N. A. Sturankesken, M. 

Jnhanson, John Suominen, Oscar 

Johan.-'on, Fritz Swanson, Ben 




I 



ill f/Mky, 

SHARE /IIH/THE\VICTORY 

/save FOR YOVRCOVNTRY '[^ SAVE FOR. YOVRSELF 

/bVY ¥AR^SAY1NGS SIAMPS 



i'M t^^ V 



Hftsxetl Ccffirv 



CARRY ON! 

Uncle Sam is releasing from his service the men who went "over 
there" to free the world from autocracy. Thousands of soldiers are 
daily receiving their honorable discharges; they pocket their pay, 
bid farewell to their comrades, and sally forth — civilians. 

There is one army, however, which must not be demobilized. 
That is the army of War-Savings Stamp buyers. More recruits are 
needed to carry on the campaign of readjustment which follows 
the signing of the armistice. 

The army of fighters has achieved its purpose. 

The army of savers must remain in "action." 

"Carry on" to a lasting peace under the banner of W. S. S.! 



Jolianson, J. A. 
Johnson, J. E. 
.lonasen. J. 
Jones, Brest L. 
Kallio, Friink 
Kind, Herman 
Kolodzieg. George 
Kristoffersen, A. 
Larsen, J. -1542 
Lechemus, Bill 



Thompson, Alex. 

Thompson, Maurice 

Toivonen, F. 

Vizcarra, Oscar 

Wrigg, F. 

V.'ilhalmson, Karl 
J,Wahi. J. 
B.Yarvinen, V. H. 

Yeaman, W. E. 

Zunderer, Heo 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Alfredsen, Adolf Marks, Walter 
Anderson, Harold F.Martenson, Adolp 
Carlstrand Gustaf Martinsson, E. 
Houge. Anton Meyer, Karl 

Kennedy, James ReaNielsen, Alf. W. 
Kennedy, Jas. Rea Nelson, C. W. 

(Package) Olsen, Robert 

Lapauble, Jean Reilley, Ralph 

Pierre Leyfried, M. -2962 

Magail, Michael 



You Want the Truth 

ThlB year there will be stirring times 
In the Nation. TTnder government cen- 
sorship It la Increasingly difficult for 
the average man to get tb» real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will he specially represented at Wash- 
ington and win analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Follette la making s 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people and place 
them where they belong — on excess 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and Incomes. Because of this be Is be- 
ing attacked mnro hltterlv tb«n anv 
other TTi^" In piihUr 'ff» 

Send In your order todav 

$1.00 P*»r Year — AereTi*-" ^Vanted 
La Follette'i Magazine, Madlton, Wla. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

I am representing the Union men 
who are entitled to salvage and 
members of the crew of the fol- 
lowing- vessels. In most cases ac- 
tion has commenced. In some cases 
ilie funds have been recovered. In 
others they are readily recoverable 
upon filing power of attorney form 
with me. Address this office by letter. 
"Princeton" vs. "Ardmore," $7500 re- 
ceived. "Gulf of Mexico" vs. Bark 
"Portugal," $5000, "Gulf Coast" vs. 
"Boxleaf," settled. "Argonaut" vs. 
"Jason," funds received, "Iroquois" 
vs. "Skinner," settled, crews share 
$12,250. "Brasos" vs. "Iroquois," set- 
tled. "Maine" vs. "Theresa Ac- 
comme." "Oskawa" vs. "Westgrove." 
"Buda 2" vs. "Western Star." "St. 
Charles" vs. "Monte Cenis." "Flor- 
ence Olsen" vs. "Marina." Flor- 
ence Olsen" vs. "Claremont." "Alli- 
ance" vs. "Belvernon." "Donnelly" 
vs. "Irish." "Anacortes" vs. "S. O. 
Barge No. 95." "Fred W. Wellor" 
vs. "Overbrook." "Neptunas" vs, 
"Panama." "Quincy" v«. "Transpor- 
tation." "Herman Frash" vs. "Bril- 
liant." "O'Neil" vs. "Oregon." Bark 
"Superior." "Pan American" vs. 
"Santa Rita." "St. Charles" vs. 
"Tea." Tug "Navigator" vs. "Edgar 
H. Vance." "Tunica" vs. "Neppon- 
ier." "Lake Charles" vs. "Cantiwo." 
Silas B. Axtell, 1 Broadway, New 
York City. 8-20-18 



Home Newt 



Official estimates put the number 
of British, French and German-born 
wives brought home by officers and 
privates of the American Expedi- 
tionary Force at 18,000. 

Citrus growers in California will 
spend $2,800,000 for the purchase of 
41,414 acres of land in Lassen Coun- 
ty, covered with pine and white fir 
trees and the erection thereon of a 
modern lumbering plant and box 
factory. The trees are to furnish 
material for making each year 20,- 
000,000 orange and lemon boxes. 

Returns from the State of Wis- 
consin covering the vote on the Sol- 
diers' Bonus Bill indicate that the 
measure was ratified by the voters 
at a ratio of at least fouir to one. 
The measure gives $10.00 per month 
for every month served by Wiscon- 
sin soldiers during the war. The 
approval of this bill by the voters of 
the State indicates very clearly their 
disposition to, in a measure, repay 
them for the sacrifices they made to 
establish democracy. 

Actual control of the production 
activities of Rock Island arsenal 
harness shops, including appoint- 
ment of foremen and the determina- 
tion of prices to be paid workmen, 
has been turned over to committees 
of the employes by the Secretary 
of War, Newton D. Baker. Ad- 
vocates of the Plumb plan for the 
nationalization of the railroads of 
the country asserted that this ar- 
rangement approximates the princi- 
ples of the Plumb plan. 

The Federal Board for Vocational 
Education has called attention to 
the^ four conditions that must exist 
before a person may be considered 
as eligible for vocational training 
under the vocational rehabilitation 
law. First, he must have been 
honorably discharged from the mili- 
tary service since April 7, 1917; sec- 
ond, he must have a disability in- 
curred or aggravated during service, 
or traceable to that service; third, 
his disability must constitute a voca- 
tional handicap, and fourth, phys- 
ically and mentally he must be cap- 
able of training. 

Great inud geysers which at times 
shoot boiling hot mud, water and 
steam 70 feet into the air, have at- 
tracted great interest along the 
shores of the Salton Sea in Southern 
California during recent weeks. These 
mud cauldrons have appeared as the 
waters of the sea have receded, but 
only very recently have they been 
exhibiting signs of intense life. The 
geysers are quite similar in appear- 
ance and action to those found at the 
southern end of the Imperial Valley, 
about 100 miles southward, in the 
Volcano Lake country. The new 
geysers seem to be accompanied by 
considerable gas. 

The American Labor party of 
Greater New York in convention, 
August 23, passed resolutions in 
favor of "giving all soldiers, sailors 
and marines who are now, or were, 
in service during the world war, 
and who are Vi/illing to live on and 
cultivate them, the first preference 
to farms on the Western railroad 
lands; and all other citizens of our 
country desiring them to be given 
farms on these and other available 
lands, instead of being relegated to 
swamp, arid and cut-over timber 
lands; houses and other buildings to 
be erected by the Government and 
furnished to all desiring them at 
cost." 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Domestic and Naval 



The Rotterdanische Lloyd, Rotter- 
dam, is said to have contracted with 
the Sun Shipbuilding Co., Phila- 
delphia, for a steamer of 11,500 tons 
deadweight, delivery April, 1920. 

Kermit Roosevelt has been ap- 
pointed Secretary of the American 
Ship and Commerce Corporation, the 
holding company of the Cramps 
Shipbuilding Company and the Kerr 
Navigation Company. 

The steamship "Strathnavcr," 5268 
tons gross, built in 1919 by the 
Downey Shipyard Corp. at Arling- 
ton, N. Y., and owned by the U. S. 
Shipping Board, is reported sold to 
the Fidelity S. S. Co., Boston. 

The steamship "Abron," 5383 tons 
gross, 3265 net, carries about 7517 
tons on 23.8 ft. draft, steams 10^ 
knots on 36 tons oil, built by the 
Downey Ship Building Corp., New 
York, in 1918, and 'owned by the 
U. S. Shipping Board, is reported 
sold to J. E. DockendorfF & Co., 
New York. 

The steamship "Columbia." 1923 
tons gross, 1188 net, carries about 
2900 tons deadweight on 18 ft. draft, 
steams 9^ knots on 23 tons coal, 
built by Harlan & HoUingsworth, 
Wilmington. Del., in 1912, and 
owned by the U. S. Shipping Board, 
is reported sold to W. R. Grace & 
Co., New York. 

Nine survivors of the crew of the 
steamer "Corydon," sunk in the Ba- 
hama channel on September 9 dur- 
ing the hurricane, were brought to 
Miami, Florida, September 11, in a 
weakened condition from being buf- 
feted in a lifeboat by a high sea for 
two days without food or water. 
Twenty-seven of the crew lost their 
lives. 

In a statement issued by the 
Newburgh Shipyards, Inc., on the 
occasion of the launching of the 
9000-ton deadweight steel freighter 
■'Peekskill," the claim is made that 
the plant has established a record 
for the Atlantic Coast by having 
launched two 9,000-ton boats from 
each building slip during the past 
twelve months. 

The Cunard Steamship Co. has 
leased Municipal Pier No. 16, at 
the foot of Dock Street, Philadel- 
phia, in anticipation of inaugurating 
a passenger service from that port. 
The pier, which is one of the most 
up-to-date structures of its kind, is 
regarded as a perfect docking site 
for the proposed line. The rental 
of the pier is $28,000 annually. 

The voyage from Colon to West 
Hartlepool, England, a distance of 
4033 miles, was made in 24 days, 11 
hours and 22 minutes by the Port- 
land, Oregon, built wooden steamer 
"Ahala," according to a letter re- 
ceived by the Shipping Board office 
from G. J. Linnander, master. The 
vessel was built by the Grant, Smith, 
Porter Company. No engine trouble 
was experienced during the entire 
trip. The vessel also made fast time 
between Astoria and Balboa. 

Tampa Interocean Steamship Co. 
has been incorporated in Tampa. 
Fla.. to establish ship service tending 
to develop the trade of that port. 
The capitalization is $300,000, with 
privilege of increasing to $5,000,000, 
and plans include the construction 
of terminals. The officers are: H. 
T. I.ykes, president; Frank Bcntley, 
P. G. Wall and H. E. Snow, vice- 
presidents; H. C. Culbreath, secre- 
tary and treasurer: Philip Shore, 
general manager, all of Tampa. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, CaL 

Member of the Associated Savings BanKs of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30, 1919. 

Assets $60,509,192.14 

Deposits 57,122,180.22 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,387,011.92 

Kinployees' Pension Fund 306,852.44 



OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GKO. TOURNY, Vice-Pres. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Prss. and CashUr 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President 

WILUAM HERRMANN, Assistant Caahler 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary 
WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 
GOODFELLOW, EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, 
General Attorneys 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 

E. A. CHRISTENSON L. S. SHERMAN 



San Francisco Letter List 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver, Business Manager, The 
Seamen's Journal, 59 Clay Street, San 
Francisco, Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Aberg, Einar 
Adams, Arch 
Adamson, HJ. 
Adainsson. John 
Aguilar, Alt'. 
Aimer, Robert 
Akerman, V. 
Alto, H. 
Alto, W. 
Andersen, Adolf 



Andersson, C. -797 
Anderson. John A. 
Anderson, John F. 
Anderson, Ekiw. 
Andersson, Chaheles 
Andersson, O. L. 
Andersson, C. -2185 
!\.ngelback, Geo. 
Ardt, Anton 
Aro, Kalle 



Joiisen, E. A. 
Jensen, J. F. 
Jeppesen, Lars 
Jessen, Carl 
Jcrnberg, A. 

Kaholemoku, W. 
Kane, John 
Karlui, Veda 
Karlgierr, Gust 
Kennedy. J. R. 
Klnamon, Jack 
Kinghorn, Frank 
Kittelsen, Karl 



Jonsson, Erik 

Jorgensen, Johannes 
Jorgensen, Ole E. 
Jorgensen. Jorgen 

Kiyanno, F. W. B. 
Knudsen, Rangvald 
Koluin, Oscar 
Kooistra, S. 
Krislensen, A. -1095 
Krohn, Harry 
Knox, David 
Kullbom, Oscar 



Andersen, F. -1473 Ask, E. A. 
Andersen, N. -197»Augustine. Anth. 
Andarsson, A. O. Austed, Barney 



Balco, Juan 
Uaamont, H. 
Benson. S. -986 
Benluso Manl. 
Billington Martin 
Bjoikvist, Ragn 
Bjorka, Hans K. 
BJorklund. G. 
Bjorn. Kristian 
Bleasing, \V. 
Blomgren, C. A. 
Bode, Wilhelm 

Cameron, James 
Case, Rait E. 
Carlsen, Julius 
Carlson, Andrew 
Carlson, E. R. 



Borjesen, L. 
Bosshard, Henry 
Brady, B. 
Brain, Louis 
Browne, Chas. B. 
Bruuin, E. -2583 
Brvant, J. S. 
Bugel, J. 
Bunting, A. 
Byars, Terry 
Bye. K. 
Bye, Alf. 

Chrlstenson, Einar 
Clark, Chas. R. 
Clausen, Louis 
Collins, Frank 
Conigan, R. B. 



Carlson. E. b. -1769Conrad, P. W. 
Carroll, James Cordey, Allan 

CatechlB, JU Correro. T. R. 

Chrlslensen, H. C. Cox, R. H. 
Christensen, R. H. Crowley, Fred 



Dahler, H. N. 
Dahlstrom, Sv«n 
Danielsen, Henry 
Danlelson, Harry 
Daskeland, N. N. 
Davis, V^'arren 
Dawson, Herebrt 
Delahanty, J. J. 
Devenay, Ed. 

Edler, Fritz 
Edwards, Ole 
Egenas, Nils 
Ehlers, Heinle 
Eide, J. -962 
Klliot, Pletro 
Einard, J. 
Einartsen, Hans 
Elo, Frank 

Fagerly, O. 
Falbom, Albln 
Felsch, C. 
Fernandez, G. L. 
Flgved, Sigurd 
Fitsburg, Gordon 
Flinkenberg, F. 
Fjellman, Geo. 

Gailunas, Anton 
Gans, Frans 
Gasok, Willy 
Gibson, C. R. 
Goodmans, 6. 
Greenfield, J. Wm 
Gronroos, John 

Haak, R. 
Hakala, J. 
Hakala, Paavo 
Hakala, Paul 
llalley, W. 
Halvorsen, Chris. 
Halvorsen, Torlelf 
Hamilton, W. G. 
Hammer, Carl 
Hammerquist, A. 
Hamren, T. O. 
Hannollus, R. F. 
Hanschman, W. 
Hannesen, K. J. 
Hansen, Hans P. 
Hansen, Oskar 
Hansen, R. C. A. 
Hansen, Kristen 
Hansen, H. M. 
Hansen, R. 
Hanson, Frank 



Didrlksen, Martin 
DriscoU, John 
Douglas, W. F. 
Drysdale, H. 
Dumas, Clifford 
Dumas, J. 
Dunham, Chas. 
Dunkel, E. 



Engstrom, Ben 
Engelbregtsen, C. 
Erbe, Lewis 
Erlkson, A. -571 
Erlkson, Chas. 
Esplund, Fred 
Essen, C. A. 
Evenson, A. 
Evensen, Martin 

Forslund, Fred 
Foss, L. 
Frlzzell, R. L. 
Fredriksen. Herman 
Frizzellc. .lark 
Frost Peter 
Fuller, Geo. 



Gronroos, Elbin 
GuUaksen, Hans 
Grussman, G. A. 
Gundersen, Andreas 
Gutmann, Paul C. 
. M. -1123 



M. 



Ffanson. Carl 
Heaps, James 
Helden, Harry 
Heldahl, T. 
Ilenrikson, J. L 
Henrlksson, W. 
Hermansson, Frits 
Henzengo, Cornelio 
Hewell, 
Hicks. Jim 
Hilli. Albert 
HIngren, J. HJ. 
Hjerling, Hj. 
Holmgren. G. J. 
Holland, D. 
HoUingsworth, W. C 
Horner, A. 
Hunter, G. H. 
Hugo. O. -19.'!4 
Hubertz, Emll 
Hy, Ben 



Ingebretsen, Alf. Iversen, iver 



.Tacobson, Jacob 
Jaderholm, Hans 
JakuUis, Johinn 
Janson. C. J. W. 
Jansson, K. H. 



Johnsen, Norman 
.Tohan.sen, A. -2183 
Johnsen, Walther 
Johansson, Nath. 
Johnston. Leslie 



Lagerberg, Chas. Lefter, John A. 
l.aine, J. E. l^wis. Wm. 

Lamberg, Herman Liesen, Win. 
Lambert, S. I. Lindgross, I^. II. 

Landburg, Herman Lofgren, R. 
Landregan, J. W. Loland, Louis 
Langworthy, ii C. Lonnqvist, John 
Larsen, Fingl. Loughrey, C. V»^. 

Larsen, Kaare Lundberg, Oskar 

Larsen, J. H. -2280Lyngard, Geo. 
Larsen, K. -166U 



MacGregor, Donald 
Mahler, Hans 
Malioney, F. J. 
Maldonado, A. 
Marshall, I. S. 
Martins, Jose 
Martin, John 
Mathis. H. 
McManus, P. 
Meek, O. J. 
Mettson, Carl 

Nagel, A. 
Nagle, Chris. 
.Neuidorff, F. R. 
Nelsen, Rangvald 
Nelson, Fred 
Nelson, Waldemar 
Nelson, John, -1013 
Nelson, A. W. 
Ness, Aksel 
Nickolsen, L. 
Nicolaisen, S. 
Nielsen, Villy 
Nielsen, Carl C. 

Olafson, O. B. 
Olsen, H. -1314 
Olsen, Marinus 
Olsen, Oskar 
Olsen, Jens 
Olson. E. A. 

Parson, Herman 
Petersen, H. A. 
Pedersen, Peter B. 
Pendlebury, Tom 
Persson, Edw. 
Persson, O. W. 
Perselli, Geo. 
Peters, J. M. 
Peterson, Jennings 
Peterson, M. 
Petersen, O. -1595 

Kantanen, F. 
Rasmussen, E. V. 
Rasmussen, 
Renrall, A. 
Richardson, J. 
Richardson, E, 
Kickhoff, W. 
Rlddell, Allan 
Riesbeck, Hj. 



Emil 



W. 
A. 



Meza, Leonardo 
Mikkelsen. Olaf 
Miller, F. A. 
Miller. William 
Mlttemeyer, Y. F. 
Moe, R. 
Monson, M. O. 
Moore, Thos. 
Moren, E. H. 
Morrison, Phillip 

Nielsen, C. -1303 
Nielsen, P. L. 
Nielsen, Willy 
Nielsen, C. -1314 
Nilsen, Edon 
Nillsen, Jens 
Nilsson, S. H. II. 
Noonan, J. 
Nordenberg, Alfred 
Nordstrom, Bror 
Nunes. C. C. 
Nyland, A. M. J. 

Olsson, Axel 
Olsson. C. O. 
Orzednowsky, Leo 
Oseberg, Ansgar 
Osth, T. 
Owens, Wm. 

Peterson, L. -1389 
Peltibone, G. W. 
Pettersen. Higbert 
Pihlstrom, R, J. 
Pilkinton. Homer 
Pinkhurst, C. B. 
Porter, R. 
Preen, P. A. van 
Prinz, Carl 
Prun, John 
Pulver, W. F. 

Ringman, C. W. 
Roach, S. 
Rohman, Geo. 
Ronning, H. 
Rosa, John 
Ross, Geo. 
Rosen, V. 
Rundell, W. 
Ryan, Patrick 



Saalnia. Joseph 
Salilin, Nils 
Sandblom, K. 
Sanne, R. 
Sclilachte, Alf. 
Scott, B. F. 
Seiffert, John 
Shannon, J. 
Sigiist, Geo. 
Simonsen, Sigvard 
Sjolander, J. B. 
Smedsvig, O. B. 
Smith, T. J. 
Solvin, Oscar E. 

I'aival. Alf. 
Tamisar, P. 
Taninii, J. E. 
Tandberg, Einar 
Telletson, Emil 
Tergersen, Tom 
Thom, Ed. 
Tliomas, Frank 



Sparling, James 
Stange. A. -2063 
Steen, Ivar 
StensslofC, E. 
Strasdin, H. 
Strandberg, Elof 
Stranberg, P. 
Straiten, Harry 
Sundberg, F. F. 
Sundburg, C. 
Svensen. Anker 
Swanson, Oscar 
Swanson, S. 
Sweeney, D. 

Thompsen. Jack 
Thompson, C. 
Tonning, Chris. 
Torjussen, J. I. -1028 
Tibbltts, P. 
Toftri, A. 
Torrance, John 
Tyrrell, James 



Van Fleet, F. B. 
Van Reen, T. R. 
Vander, Klift J. 



Venquirst, E. 
A. Victor, J. 
J. Vihavainen, Geo. 



Wallenstrand Wickstrom, J. A. 

Weelen, Theodorus Wikstrom, W. 

Wehtje, W. H. AVikman, D. 

Weijola. Arturl Wilhelm, E. 

Weinberg, Kriss Williams. Charley 

Westerlund, Albert Woods. E. J. -714 

Wickstrom. Axel Wrelljan. Joseph 



PACKAGES. 



Benson, Fred 
Egan, John 
Flood, Alex. 
Goodmans, O. 
Gunderson, Ole 
Highland, D. 
Irmey, Ft-ed 
Jewett, Chas. 
Johansen, S. R. 



Johaneson, K. 
Long. C. 
MacDonnell, W. 
Mayes, J. B. 
Monroe, A. J. 
Olsen, H. 
Olsen, Ole 
Ol«on. Knut 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Ingwald Johnson and Charles Mol- 
ler, members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Chehalis," on January 29, 1919, when 
Otto Peterson was injured, kindly 
report to the Secretary, Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal. 



Charles L. Carlsen, No. 1834, who 
disappeared from the barge "Isaac 
Reed" at Eureka, California, on De- 
cember 31, 1918, is inquired for by 
his wife, Mrs. C. L. Carlsen, 107 
Courtland Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



Oscar Aberg, a native of Sweden, 
age 25 years, last heard of in New- 
port News, Va., March, 1917. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts will 
please notify his sister, Mrs. Gurli 
Landee, Box 166, Millburn, N. J. 

3-26-19 



Members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Argonaut," who assisted in the sal- 
vage services to the S. S. "Jason," at 
the time she was in distress off the 
coast of Florida, on or about Janu- 
ary 1st, 1918, will kindly call or 
communicate with the undersigned 
who is representing most of the offi- 
cers and crew of the S. S. "Argo- 
naut." Silas B. Axteil, One Broad- 
way, New York City. 

Phone Kearny 6361 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 

Opposite Southern Pacific BIdg. 

60 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Walt, by the Latest Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
lA'E USE ONLY THK BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 



CHRISTENSEN 'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Established 1906 

CAPT. C. EHLERS, Superintendent 
257 Hansford Bldg 
268 Market Street 

The pupils of this well known school 
are taught all up-to-date requirements 
for passing a successful examination 
before the United States Steamboat 
Inspection Service. 




i 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Kearny 5132 

East Street Tailors 

GENERAL OUTFITTER 

Altering done at moderate prices 

209 East Street, nr. Washington 

San Francisco 

H. LEVERIDGE 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 to 50 cents per day, 
or $2 to $3.00 per weeK with all mod- 
ern conveniences. Free Hot and Cold 
Shower Baths on every floor. Elevator 
Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Qarfleld 2467 

HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
THOS. S. CHRISTEN8EN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 775* 

Res., Randolph 27 
Office Hours. 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Franclcce, Cai. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

QNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices. :: :: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



LOOK 

For the Name and the Number 

GEO. A. PRICE 

19 East Street, San Francisco 

U. S. Navy Tower's 

Sea Boots Flannels Oil Skins 

SEAMEN— OUTFITTER— FISHERMEN 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 
Uniforms, Caps, Hatt, Shoei 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



Jortall Bros. Expresi 

Stand and Baggage Room 

— at — 

212 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Reliable Tailor 

Up-to-date Cloths at Popular 
Prices. All work guaranteed. 

TOM WILLIAMS 

28 SACRAMENTO STREET 

Near Market 

Special Inducements to Seafaring Trade 

SUITS STEAM PRESSED, 50 Cts. 

The only way; no burning of 
garments. 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 



716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 



UNION MADE 
IN OUR OWN SHOP 

Represented by 

E. PEGUILLAN 




SUITS AND 
OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 
Prices 




i^ ARE YOUR LIBERTY BONDS SAFE 

Bring or send them for safekeeping to this Savings 
/Qii and Commercial Bank and open a 

J^ LIBERTY BONDS SAVINGS ACCOUNT 

j'Aj^^^ We will take care of your Liberty Bonds for you 
=i5i^ free of charge. Our folder 

"What Shall I Do With Them" V?elt\ffy;7'coVy"ttdt 

Anglo-California Trust Company Bank 

"THE PERSONAL SERVICE BANK" 

Market and Sansome Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

Sixteenth and Mission Streets Third and Twentieth Streets 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO SEAFARING MEN 



UTTMARK'S NAUTICAL ACADEMY 

(Established 18S2) 
CAPTAIN F. E. UTTMARK, Principal 



8 State Street 
New York, N. Y. 



30 India Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR MASTERS', MATES' AND 
PILOTS' EXAMINATION 

Our ACADEMY is recognized as the oldest and best equipped NAVIGATION 

SCHOOL in the United States and is up to date in every respect. For 

full information call at school or write. Catalog sent free on request. 

"UTTMARK'S FOR NAVIGATION" 



&5A 
vWORKERSUNIONy 



UNIOr^STAMP 

lidory 



Named Shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bean 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
Collis Lovely, Gen. Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



[fif^'' &PRiwt'Voii^ B>y 




Ask for this Label 
on Beer 



INT'L UNION OF 
UNITED BREWERY and 
SOFT DRINK WORKERS 

OF AMERICA 
Asks you to write and speak to your 




Ask for this Label 
on Soft Drinks 



STATE ASSEMBLYMEN AND STATE SENATORS 

TO • 

WORK AND VOTE 

Against the Ratification of the National Prohibition Amendment 
to the Constitution 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 

Proprletort 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
«3»W trWANrTSm 



Nevr« from Abroad 



Now that Holland and Sweden 
have universal .suffrage, northern 
Europe has become almost com- 
pletely suffrage territory. 

Total casualties sustained by the 
American Expeditionary Forces in 
Siberia up to August 31, 1919, were 
162 out of a force of 8,477 officers 
and men, according to the official 
announcement. 

After 56 years of parliamentary 
opposition to woman suffrage, the 
women of Italy have received the 
political and administrative vote. 
The reform was accepted in early 
September almost with unanimity by 
the present chamber. 

Australian Government figures 
show an increase in the cost of 
living throughout the Commonwealth 
of Australia of only 46 per cent, 
since 1911, In June of the present 
year it required $6.93 to buy what 
Iiad been purchased in 1911 at $4.76. 

VV. L. Mackenzie King, the new- 
ly appointed leader of the Liberal 
party in Canada, has the distinction 
of being the youngest man who has 
ever been chosen to lead one of the 
big political parties of the Do- 
minion. His book, "Industry and 
Humanity" was the result of an 
investigation into world-wide indus- 
trial relations under the auspices of 
the Rockefeller Foundation. 

A cable despatch from London 
states that Harland & Wolff, Limited, 
the well-known Belfast shipbuilding 
company, has acquired the works 
of D. & W Henderson, Limited, 
and A. and J. Inglis, on the Clyde. 
The purchase of the two shipbuild- 
ing companies recalls that Harland 
& Wolff recently acquired Caird & 
Co., of Greenock. It is already in- 
tersted in other yards on the Clyde. 

A recent British Admiralty order 
dealing with the fishing industry di- 
rects that the crews of British fishing 
vessels must consist of (1) none but 
British subjects; (2) subjects of allied 
nations, and (3) subjects of neutral 
nations who have received permis- 
sion from the senior naval officer of 
the port from v\'hich they sail. All 
skippers must be British. Fishing 
vessels can now fish in all waters 
except those described as dangerous 
in the current mine warnings to 
mariners. 

A recertt consular report on Italian 
trade says: Fresh fish amounting to 
1,586 tons and valued at $470,000 
were taken by Germany, Austria and 
France last year. Of fish in brine 
1,431 tons, valued at $210,000, were 
exported, 600 tons to the United 
States, 280 tons to Austria and 122 
to Argentina. Other fish exported 
were valued at $344,000 and were 
principally tunny and sardines in oil 
prepared in sp'ecial ways. Of fresh 
oysters, 539 tons, valued at $75,000, 
went mostly to France and Austria- 
Hungary. 

American forces which will remain 
in Germany after September 30 are 
the Eighth Infantry, Seventh Machine 
Gun Battalion, second battalion of the 
Sixth Field Artillery, Thirty-fifth Field 
Signal Battalion, First Supply Train, 
First Mobile Ordnance, Repair Shop, 
Company A of he First Engineers. 
Field Hospital No. 13, and Ambulance 
Company No. 26. The aggregate 
strength of these units will be nearly 
7000 officers and men. The infantry 
regiment comprises 3800, the machine 
gun battalion 775, the artillery 750, 
and the engineers 250, giving a total 
combatant strength of over SSOO. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the WiU 



"Are they well mated?"' "I shouM 
say so. He seems to be able to 
make money almost as fast as she 
can spend it."— Detroit Free Press. 



Ted — He"s a (|uecr gink. He ray.- 
he likes to write free verse. Ned— 
There's no accounting for tastes. I 
know fellows who claim they like ti> 
read it.— Life. 



The Phrenologist— Yes, sir, by 
feeling the bumps on your head I 
can tell exactly what sort of man 
you are. Mr. Doolan— Oi belave it 
will give ye more ov an oidea wot 
sort ov a woman me woife is. — Jack 
Canuck. 



]|e— My dear, I can't afiford to 
buy you that hat. She— Still you'd 
save money if you did. He — How do 
you make that out? She— Because 1 
shall fret myself ill if I don't get it, 
and you know what doctors' bills 
arc.— Tit-Bits. 



Seldom a day passes that does not 
bring a laugh from Camp Kearny. 
One of the best was handed out by 
a doughboy just mustered out. Seems 
the camp had several baseball nines, 
and rivalry between them was keen. 
Thus it chanced that a doughboy 
who was showing his girl about 
camp could not refrain from paus- 
ing a moment where his company 
team was practicing. Pointing to 
one husky who was tirelessly pitch- 
ing drops and outcurves, the lad ex- 
claimed: "See that fellow? Before 
long he'll be our best man." "This 
is so sudden," cried the girl, blush- 
ing. 



Two British stenographers were 
boasting of the speed of their short- 
hand writing. "Whenever 1 am re- 
porting at a meeting on a warm 
evening, all the people try to get 
near to my table." "Why?" asked 
the other. "Because," said the pen- 
pusher, "my hand goes so fast that 
it creates a current of air like a 
fan." "A mere nothing," said num- 
ber two. "I always have to report 
on wet paper, or else the current 
of air caused by the movenicnt of 
my hand would blow it away. Be- 
sides, the paper has to be wetted 
every few minutes, because the 
friction caused by the rapid move- 
ments of my arms would set fire to 
it in no time." 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 



1122-!T24 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Children*s Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show thpm.by example 
that you believe in a savings account. 

They cannot start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Taylor*s Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to Illustrate and 
leach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
tills always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education recjuirtd of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may he, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




HORACE R. TAYLOR 



HENRY TAYLOR 



TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

510 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

IMPORTERS OF NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

LORD KELVIN'S and WHYTE THOMSON'S 
Compasses, Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sound- 
ing Machines, Sextants, Parallel Rulers, Pelorus Di- 
viders and Nautical Books of Eveiy de; cription. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 
1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to 'Vessels 



J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When Yau Buy 
from U», Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Cash. 



Diamonds 
Watches 



Phona Douglaa iTU 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Slie 




SOLID QOLD $1.50 
QOUO FILLEO ,50 



64 MARKET STREET 



High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

SEAMEN-- When in Port- BE SURE 

You see the most complete line of 

UNION LABEL SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS IN THE U. S. A. 

Sold Direct to You at Manufacturer's Prices 



EAGLESON 8 CO. 



1118 Market St. 
San Francisco 
717 K St., near Postoffice 

Sacramento 
112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 



Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Silverware 

715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

Big Stock— Everything Marked in Plain Figures 
THF. OXE-PRICK lEWF.l.kV STORE 
QqmesJi.eorensen ^^NE WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 
l^^t^an^ -Jrtttij At the Big Red Clock and the Chimes. 





Market at Fifth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes. Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend. San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN! 
You Know Ma 




I am 
"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large as.sortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats too. 

It you want your Panama blocked 

right, I'll do that. 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



BCD SEAL CIGAIt CO., MANUrACTUKSS 

133 FIRST STREET. 8. F. 
Phone Douolas 1M0 



OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE 

JtaUTS! 





FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXIII, No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1919. 



Whole No. 2559. 



LESSON OF ALASKA 



Nations, Like Individuals, Find It Hard to Get Out of Age-Old Ruts 



The following article is by Benton 
Mackaye, and is reprinted from "The 
Public." Mr. Mackaye is a forestry expert 
and employed in that capacity as a 
specialist for tlie United States Labor 
Department. 

To the rest of the world Alaska is still 
pretty much of a terra incognita. Like 
all other little explored regions of the 
earth its only partially revealed secrets 
appeal strongly to the imagination, creat- 
ing a desire for fuller revelations. We 
here in the United States are particularly 
interested in learning of the natural 
resources and opportunities in this, our 
largest territory, and how they may best 
be conserved for our posterity. Informa- 
tion on these heads is supplied by Mr. 
Mackaye in a manner both entertaining 
and instructive. 



"But you see Alaska doesn't want to be 
the dog." 

This is the sentiment, expressed usually 
with a sweet and triumphant smile, that meets 
any suggestion that workers on our last 
frontier be saved the miseries of our first 
pioneers. This sample of statesmanship is 
the reply to those daring to propose — for a 
new land and new hopes — certain reversals in 
a land system which has proved, in the States, 
the undoing of pioneers and the children of 
pioneers. 

What are these reversals? 

They are nothing new. Let THE people — 
not SOME people — control natural oppor- 
tunities. Let them also manage their own 
utilities. 

But such stuff, we are told in regulation 
accent, is a "dangerous experiment" in which 
Alaska refuses to be the dog. 

Anyhow the vivisection has begun. It began 
March 12, 1914. Government ownership of 
railroads was then authorized in Alaska. The 
first line will run from Seward, on Resurrec- 
tion Bay, to Fairbanks on the Tanana (main 
branch of the Yukon). 

The line is strategic. It connects two 
climates and three main resources. In its 463 
miles it spans the mild winter climate of the 
southern coast (the climate of New England 
and Scandinavia) and the cold, dry, bracing 
winter of the interior (the climate of Mani- 
toba). 

From Seward to Upper Cook Inlet the route 
traverses some ISO miles of the Chugach 
National Forest, with its big Douglas fir, 
spruce, cedar, and other Pacific Coast timber. 
A branch then runs 38 miles eastward to tlie 
extensive Matanuska coal fields. The main 
line, proceeding west and north, hits up the 
Susitna River, going 100 miles through broad, 



level, wooded country destined for agricultural 
use. Thence entering the upper canyons it 
runs 130 miles across Broad Pass and the other 
rugged Mt. McKinley country, and finally 83 
miles to Fairbanks through future farming 
territory on the Nanana and Tanana Rivers. 

The line is a "cross section" of Alaska and 
its chief land resources. There are the forests 
of the Chugach, the coal seams of the Mata- 
nuska, and the potential farming areas of the 
Susitna and other valleys. 

With two of these resources — the timber and 
tlie coal — the principle of "Single tax" is actu- 
ally on the job. Only there is no taxation 
about it. The public doesn't "take" the ground 
rent; it just keeps it. Public values are not 
thrown overboard for the joy of fishing after 
them with the uncertain harpoon of taxation; 
they are kept snug in the hold of the ship of 
state just where they properly belong. 

It happens like this: On the Chugach, as in 
all National Forests, the Government sells the 
"stumpagc," that is, the timber standing on 
the stump. The stumpage price of standing 
timiber is what is left out of the market price 
of delivered lumber after paying all costs (and 
grafts) of converting said timber into said 
lumber. This stumpage is the "ground rent" 
of the timber crop. It is retained by the owner 
of the timber, and since in this case the public 
does its own owning it holds on to its own 
ground rent. 

The Chugach Forest, and the Tongass 
National Forest in southeastern Alaska, contain 
together the main bodies of valuable timber in 
the mountainous coastal region — about 20,000,000 
acres of Government land. This land, handled 
under a permanent system of forestry, should 
serve most of the timber needs of the Terri- 
tory, as well as yield a goodly amount for 
export in the form of lumber and pulp material. 

As the timber is sold on the stump for so 
much per thousand feet, so the coal is sold in 
the ground for so much per ton. This applies 
to the Matanuska and to all the coal lands in 
Alaska. The Government gets a stumpage 
price for the timber and a royalty for the coal; 
and both stumpage and royalty are "ground 
rent." 

Although Uncle Sam does his own owning in 
the coal fields of Alaska, only in part has he 
enabled himself to become his own operator. 
Under the Alaskan coal land law (of October 
20, 1914) certain acreages may be reserved for 
public purposes. Coal in lands thus reserved 
"may be mined under the direction of the Presi- 
dent when in his opinion the mining of such 
coal" becomes necessary for certain public 
reasons, including "relief from monopoly or 
oppressive conditions." These reserved lands 
are limited to twelve square miles in the 
Matanuska, to eight square miles in tlic 
Bering River (the other main coal field in 
Alaska) and to one-half the remaining coal 
lands in the Territory. All the other coal 
seams are to be operated under a leasing 
system. 

The "mining camp," as we know it, could, 
under this system, be forever banished from 



Alaska. Standards of labor and living condi- 
tions must, under the law, form a part of every 
coal lease. Wholesomely organized mining 
communities along the Matanuska should, there- 
fore, solve the "housing problem" for the 
miners. Equivalent provision might be made, 
under timber sale contracts, for the timber 
workers in the Chugach, and permanent forest 
communities could be organized in place of 
logging "camps." 

Alaska, then, has good prospects toward 
public development of natural opportunities. 
Her main railroad, her forests, her coal fields — 
for the time at least — promise to be held out of 
reach of privateers. Not so, however, with her 
agricultural lands. 

To the movement for the conservation of 
natural resources, which ten years ago was in 
full bloom, is due the credit for the constructive 
and enlightened policy toward Alaska's pri- 
mary resources. "Conservation" saw ground 
rent in forests and coal, but could not see it 
in agricultural soil; it had not caught up with 
New Zealand. 

Some 65,000,000 acres of potential farm and 
grazing lands await the Territory's prospec- 
tive farmers. These acres would cover four- 
fifths of Norway. They lie along the rivers of 
the interior, as well as in the Susitna, Mata- 
nuska, and other valleys on the southern coast. 
For the most part they are thickly wooded with 
the spruce, birch and Cottonwood that cross 
the continent even to Ontario and Quebec. 
Here and there, in the partly arid inland coun- 
try, these acres will need to be irrigated. Pota- 
toes, root crops, barley, oats, rye, some wheat, 
but no corn, will then be forthcoming on the 
bottom lands, with cattle and sheep on the 
uplands, and reindeer, and perhaps musk oxen, 
on the tundra plains. 

If ever a New Zealand system were appropri- 
ate, it would seem to be here in these Alaskan 
valleys as they are "opened up" by the pro- 
jected railways. It would be an engineering 
problem simpler in many cases than locating 
the railroad line itself, to locate a series of com- 
numity units along such line, and lay out in 
each the clearing and other reclamation neces- 
sary for fitting out the "ready-made farms." 
At least one such unit is already being devel- 
oped, under Government auspices, on similar 
land in Canada. The farms when "made" 
.should, of course — and would under the New 
Zealand plan — be disposed of to actual farmers 
on a basis of occupancy and use, the ground 
rent and "unearned increment" being thus 
made safe from speculation. 

But no such thing yet in Alaska. "Conserva- 
tion" never saw the point, and on March 3, 
1903, the homestead laws were made applicable 
to the Territory. Practically all available land 
lias been taken up in the Matanuska valley, and 
in the Susitna it is being taken as fast as the 
railroad penetrates. 

This, if continued, means one more heart- 
sickening repetition of "homesteading." No 
Iirovision for systematic land clearing, no com- 
munity organization — every Robinson Crusoe 
homesteader fighting alone on his island of 
i^iiigle. Some land cleared in spite of Hades, 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



then "final proof," and then the sell out to 
another jungle fighter. More land cleared, 
more land value and "increment" created — 
another sell out, and still another. Finally 
the real "sell" by the land "colonizer" who 
thereafter does the owning while the last 
gullible farmer does the working. 

But the one superlative howl that we hear 
about Alaska is that this time-revered method 
of ground speculation, though allowed with 
homestead lands, has been spotted and choked 
ofif with coal and timber lands. This, goes the 
cry, is "locking up" resources and holding up 
development. Some truth. It is "locking up" 
the GROUND RENT in resources and hold- 
ing up development of private fortunes. 

And the determination for UNlocking is 
omnipresent. An attempt last winter, through 
a Congressional sabotage, to repeal the effect 
of the Alaskan coal leasing law was exposed 
and sidetracked just in time. ^^ 

It is indeed a "dangerous experiment for 
Uncle Sam to build railroads and lock up 
ground rent in Alaska. It might teach some- 
thing. Already the Secretary of Labor has 
suggested for this Territory a comprehensive 
colonization program as part of his general 
land policy. This would round out the con- 
servation program by including agricultural 
with the other resources. A public policy of 
empire building to go with a public policy of 
railroad building and the lesson of Alaska 
will vet be learned at home. 



THE WORKERS' UNREST. 

(P.v W. B. Rubin.) 



Patience is a virtue, and peace .its goal. 

An eminent statesman long ago said: 
"Peace, peace; there can be no peace," and 
he was and still is, right. 

There was only one Job on earth. 

There was a time when the toiler was 
most peaceful and obedient, and his master 
ever proud of his faithful and willing serv- 
ant. That was in the days of slavery, and 
later, of "scabbery." Wherever slavery and 
"scabbery" dwell, peace .sojourns. 

Unrest brought about freedom, and free- 
dom is hinging upon unrest. 

The most peaceably inclined man, after 
attending a prize fight, will himself be seized 
with the lust for fight. 

The world is full of war. We took part 
in the late war — lest you forget (for Eng- 
land and General Haig already seem to 
have forgotten it) — and it is but natural^ 
that we still have on our fighting clothes. 

A smooth baseball game, however well 
l)layed, does not impress itself as does the 
one in which there was a fight and an um- 
jiire-baiting. 

The concert violinist, no matter how 
wonderful, does not exhilarate the masses 
as does the jazz dancing fiddler. In fact, 
the first plays in foreign tone to the 
throng, and while he is admired so far as 
his art is concerned, he is somewhat like 
the injunction. Because it is in Latin, the 
worker cannot understand it, and, there- 
fore, defies it. 

Soldiers have been shell-shocked, and 
we, who have watched the fight, have been 
fight-shocked. The nerves have sprung! 
Reserve is gone ! It's all fight, and — why 
not? 

Nothing is gained in peace, save rest. 

The worker cannot rest. It takes money 
and food and a competence to rest. Be- 
tween his resources and the end of his 
rest, there elapse but five days. 

Labor leaders find it difficult to control 
their members at present. However wise 
their counsel, the members are fighting 
mad. Moderation, conservatism, are terms 
obsolete. Radicalism is rampant. The 
worker wants to get while the getting is 
good. 

To ask for more than the boss is willing, 
voluntarily, to give, is radicalism. The ig- 
norant and the members of so-called good 



society even whisper that it is Bolshevism. 

Life seeks existence. If the trough is 
placed too high for the thirsty horse, he 
will "kick over the traces." 

Mr. Profiteer, let me speak to you. Put 
a soft pedal on too much profit. Get back 
to earth. Put a stopper on the H. C. of L. 
You may cut the worker's ration, but he 
will resent it. His organization may try 
to keep him in check while negotiating 
with you, but don't starve him — take my 
a(!\ ico, don't get him mad ! If the worker 
ever does get mad, it's all off with you. 
He'll hurdle over the fences of his labor 
organizations, and smash you right and 
left! 

If you are for the present system, your 
method of dealing with it is sure to kill 
"ihe goose that lays the golden eggs" for 
you. 

I repeat, don't make the worker mad. 
Mad people do not cower before the law. 
Better get ofif your high horse — a little less 
banqueting for you, and a little more sub- 
stance for the worker, to relieve the strain 
upon the nerves of the nation. 

Come, Mr. Proprietor, forget for once 
your "filthy lucre." Be a real patriot, and 
help save the country. God knows its 
many present perils. 

Oh, no; this is not a threat, nor is it a 
prophesy. 

But if you care to profit by Europe's ex- 
perience in Russia, with similar troubles 
now threatening everywhere, Italy, France, 
and England included, you will make your 
peace with the worker as quickly as pos- 
sible. 

The world will be Capital and Labor liv- 
ing side by side, if you are decent, or 

It will be Labor, living all alone! 



FIRST AID. 



Stories of how to plunge into the water 
after a drowning person look well in print 
and are thrilling. In actual operation they 
are more likely to be piteous. A drowning 
man, even a weak one, with the clammy hor- 
ror of death in his heart, will give even a 
strong man a terrific struggle, and it is much 
more the part of good sense to go after 
such a one with a boat, boat-hook, or life 
preserver. Even a novice can row a boat 
faster than a racer can swim. Almost any- 
thing is preferable to plunging overboard. 
Speed is essential, for notwithstanding news- 
paper stories to the contrary, when a per- 
son's breathing has stopped for more than 
five, and certainly when for ten minutes, he 
is dead. 

As soon as the man is taken from the 
water open his mouth, even if it is necessary 
to knock a few teeth out to pry it open ; 
block his jaws wide apart with a stick as 
thick as two fingers ; roll him on his face 
and, letting his face and feet drag on the 
ground, lift his hips two feet ofif the ground 
and bounce him in your arms or, if strong 
enough, put him across your knees and rock 
him. If he is very heavy get down on your 
hands and knees and have two others rock 
him across your back. Do not use more than 
thirty seconds getting the water out of him 
by these methods. 

After getting the water out of his lungs, 
roll him on his face, pull his arms over his 
head till you start to drag his weight, bend 
one arm at the elbow, and pillow him on his 
hand with his nose turned toward his fin- 



gers. Straddle his thighs with your knees 
about a palm's breadth below the hip joint; 
put your arms out in front of you straight 
and stiff and with the fingers and thumbs of 
each hand together, put your little fingers on 
his lowest ribs. Keep your arms straight, 
swing forward till your weight is supported 
on your hands and toes and your knees rest 
on the ground only lightly, then swing back 
so that you squat on yotir heels, and. as your 
hands do not raise off his back, have no 
weight on them. Pause an instant. Swing 
up — swing over your balance — swing back. 
Pause. Keep this up rhythmically between 
seventeen and twenty times a minute. 

A\'hile one man is making the man breathe, 
others strip him of his wet clothing and rub 
him dry. A blanket may be spread along- 
side of him and, one man taking his shoul- 
ders and another his heels, they, and the 
man making him breathe, shift him quickly 
on to the blanket. He may be shifted on to 
a stretcher in the same way. Carry both the 
drowned man and the one who is making 
him breathe off on the same stretcher. The 
doubly loaded stretcher may be put length- 
wise across the backs of the seats of an 
automobile; if no stretcher is available, put 
him on the floor of the car. It is preferable 
to have the man's head low. The swing of 
the artificial respiration is resumed instantly 
and should be continued while carrying the 
man into the hospital and for three hours 
thereafter, no matter who advises otherwise, 
or until natural breathing starts. He is then 
wrapped in the blanket and hot applications 
put against him. 

The swing of artificial respiration can be 
readily learned by onlookers and several men 
can spell each other every twenty minutes. 

If the muscles are made to move in a 
close simulation of their natural movements, 
they may have a reflex action on the nerves 
and natural breathing may start. This result 
cannot be looked for if there is any great 
jerk, pounce or bump in the swing. A dead 
man can be made to breathe by the method 
described. — Walter F. Pyne, in the Califor- 
nia Safety News. 



A USEFUL SEA SNAIL. 



Along the coast of New England there 
is a common species of sea snail that is a 
living bottle of indelible ink, very beauti- 
ful and quite as durable, when applied to 
lingerie, as any that one buys. The mol- 
lusk in question is found clinging to rocks 
just below the level of low tide, and the 
ink is contained in a whitish vein beneath 
the skin of its back. The fluid is at first 
yellow in color, but when a garment marked 
with it is exposed to the sun it turns green, 
then blue, then purple, and finally to a 
brilliant unchangeable crimson. This i.s 
one of the two species of whelks from 
which in ancient time was obtained the fa- 
mous "Tyrian purple" — a dye considered 
too splendid for the adornment of any but 
kings and nobles. Indeed, it was so costly 
that none but the very rich could afford it, 
wool dyed with it being worth $175 a 
pound. The liquor was procured by crush- 
ing the snails in a mortar. Six pounds of 
it were required to stain a pound of wool, 
the ready-woven fabric being soaked in it 
and afterward exposed to sunlight. Stuffs 
thus dyed are said to have had a remark- 
able color eflfect, presenting changing hues 
to the eye, like modern "variable" silks. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Federal Ownership Favored 

A vigorous protest by farmers against 
the return of the railroads to their private 
owners was presented to the house interstate 
commerce committee by Benjamin C. ]\Iarsh, 
representing the Farmers' National Coun- 
cil. 

j\Ir. Marsh declared the overwhelming 
majority of the farmers of America favor 
Government ownership and democratic oper- 
ation of the transportation systems. He 
pointed out that organized labor is solidly 
in favor of the same policy and said the 
sentinipnt is growing rapidly among other 
classes, "as the plan of the stockholders 
of Wall Street to get a big Government 
guarantee with the return of the railroads 
to the present owners is being understood." 

"We beHeve it is a waste of time," Mr. 
Marsh told the committee, "for Congress 
to consider any plan for the return of the 
railroads to the present owners under any 
method of safeguard whatever." 

These are the chief reasons he assigned 
for Government ownership and democratic 
operation of the roads: 

"1. To secure lower freight rates and 
equality of service. 

"2. Neither the farmers nor the city 
workers can trust Wall Street to stop its 
looting of the public if the railroads are 
returned to the present owners. Congress 
has never stopped it in the past. 

"3. The farmers and organized labor 
are disgusted with the way in which the 
stockholders and management of the rail- 
roads committed sabotage during the war to 
discredit Government ownership. 

"4. Private ownership of railroads, no 
matter how safeguarded, will continue the 
most corrupting force in political life." 



Unions Not Trusts 

The House rejected the amendment offered 
by Representative Fess of Ohio to the 
deficiency appropriation bill that provides 
funds for the prosecution of illegal com- 
binations under the Federal anti-trust law. 
His purpose in offering the amendment was 
to classify the trade unions and fanners' 
associations with trusts. This, he would 
accomplish by amending the law which says 
that no money authorized for the enforce- 
ment of the anti-trust law "shall be spent 
in the prosecution of any organization or 
individual for entering into any combina- 
tion or agreement having in view the 
increase of wages," or "shall be expended 
for the prosecution of producers of farm 
products and associations of farmers who 
co-operate and organize in an effort to 
and for the purpose to obtain and maintain 
a fair and reasonable price for their prod- 
ucts." 

These exemptions, which have been car- 
ried in the appropriation bills for a number 
of years, have excited bitter opposition, 
and those unfriendly to the trade unions 
and the farmers' associations have never 
permitted an opportunity to pass to attempt 
to eliminate them from the appropriation 
bill. 

When the House was in committee of the 
whole, Mr. Fess succeeded in securing favor- 



able action on his amendment to cut out 
the appropriation, the vote being 53 to 19. 
When the bill was reported to the House, 
the contest was over the amendment fathered 
by Representative Fess. 

Following the action of the committee of 
the whole, representatives of labor and the 
farmers' associations got busy. As a result 
of their activities the Fess amendment was 
defeated. On the demand of Representative 
Nolan of California, a member of the labor 
group, for the reconsideration, the section 
of the deficiency appropriation bill carrj'ing 
the exemptions was restored by a roll-call 
vote of 203 to 29. 



Opposed by Gompers 

"Suffer little children to come unto me,"' 
scornfully declared President Gompers before 
the Senate Interstate Commerce Committee 
in o])])Osing that portion of the Cummins 
railroad bill which would prohibit strikes of 
railroad employees. 

The bill would compel employees to accept 
any decision of five men appointed by the 
President, and in the selection of which 
the workers would have no choice. H they 
rejected the decision and suspended work 
to enforce equitable conditions they would 
be subject to fine and imprisonment. 

President Gompers used every weapon 
in his oratorical arsenal against this pro- 
posal and recounted the numerous failures 
of law makers to shackle workers to their 
jobs. While the trade unionist pleaded with 
the committee to reject this unconstitutional 
and un-American bill, he did not confine 
his efforts to this method, but warned the 
Senators that instead of stopping strikes 
they would develop lawbreakers and that "I 
would have no more hesitancy about partici- 
pating in a strike after its passage than 
I do now." 

"The labor movement," continued Presi- 
dent Gompers, "deplores strikes and only uses 
them as a last resort, for they know the 
suffering that follows strikes. But I tell 
you in all candor that the American worker 
will not surrender his right to quit his 
employment as a last resort to adjust griev- 
ances and I would hate to live one minute 
after that right was taken from him." 

• President Stone of the Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers told the committee 
the bill was the most reactionary of all 
the railroad legislation so far proposed. 

"It is dangerous," he said, "because it 
is clothed in progressive phrases. It is 
solely in the interest of capital. It not only 
denies workers the right to strike, but it 
denies them a voice in the selection of the 
final arbiters who will pass upon their 
demands." 

Glenn E. Plumb said : "Strikes are 
symptoms of social disorders, not causes. 
You propose to treat the symptoms and let 
the social fever rage." 



Food Prices Soar 

Latest reports indicate that retail prices 
for August were 1 per cent, higher than 
in July, according to the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics. In analyzing the report the 
bureau says : "That the report under con- 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Tederated Seamen's Union of Australasia, 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Internationale Transportarbeiter - Federation, 
Engelufer, 18, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE, 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev Wedels 
plads 5, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundt, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten IB., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Ccntrale Bond van Transportarbeiders, Hoofd- 
bestuur, 's Gravendykwal 111 te Rotterdam. 

Vakgroep Zeelieden, Pelikaanstraat 25, Rotter- 
dam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Geneva, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA, 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centre Maritime des Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictines 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, NataL 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Worker* 



The French teachers' congress has 
voted for the affiliation of a new 
teachers' union with the general con- 
federation of labor. 

The Scandinavian unions have de- 
cided to lend German workingmen 
$2,680,000, four-tenths from Sweden, 
three-tenths from Denmark and Nor- 
way each, to buy victuals in Scandi- 
navian countries without loss from 
the rate of German money. 

Following the example set by ac- 
tors and actresses in New York and 
other cities in the United States, 
chorus girls and boys and musicians 
of the Spanish capital have organized 
a labor union. They will at an early' 
date present demands for more fa- 
vorable contracts, according to re- 
port. 

The joint standing industrial coun- 
cil plan of representation has now 
been extended in the United King- 
dom until it includes 2,438,500 work 
people. Joint industrial councils have 
been organized in forty-one indus- 
tries, ranging from asbestos manu- 
facturing, with 3,000, to building, 
with 553,000. 

The doctors of Dundalk, Ireland, 
went on strike to enforce demands 
for a minimum salary of seven guin- 
eas (about $35) weekly for all pub- 
lic services. Their present salaries 
average 275 pounds a year. A num- 
ber of patients applying for treat- 
ment at dispensaries have been re- 
fused. 

The Socialist and Syndicalist 
Parties within what were hitherto 
the separate countries incorporated 
within the new kingdom of the 
Serbs, Croats and Slovenes have 
united into tv^o great parties pledged 
to co-operate in political and indus- 
trial action with each other. The 
Socialist Party of Jugoslavia has 
refused to be represented in the 
Belgrade Parliament, as it believes 
that the body was constituted arbi- 
trarily. Slovenia, as a result of the 
breaking down of communications 
and transport facilities, is the only 
district where the influence of the 
two new parties has been little felt. 

The alertness of the Japanese in 
attacking new world problems is 
shown in the quick formation of the 
"Capital and Labor Co-operative So- 
ciety," which is designed to fore- 
stall and arrange labor troubles 
which have sprung up in mushroom 
fashion in Japan. The leaders of 
the movement include the most 
prominent men in the country. They 
say it is the duty of wise men to 
keep the interests of the consumer 
in sight, and this can best be ac- 
complished in Japan by the creation 
of a body that will step in with its 
good offices at periods of strikes and 
lockouts. 

Representatives of all the Euro- 
pean co-operative wholesale societies 
have met at the invitation of the 
British wholesale societies for the 
purpose of establishing an Inter- 
national Wholesale Society to per- 
fect an organization whereby an 
extensive international trade is to 
he initiated. This will mean that the 
factories of the British wholesale 
societies will be many times ex- 
jianded, so that other countries may 
be supplied with British co-oper- 
atively manufactured goods, \vhile 
these will pay for goods with raw 
materials and food products. Co- 
operative organizations in Russia, 
Canada, and even certain districts in 
the United States have hitherto done 
business with the English societies. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

52914 BEACON STREET. SAN PEDRO. CAL. 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In 
the sunny south, is the ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Nav- 
igation School here and under his undivided personal supervision students 
will be thoroughly prepared to pass successfully before the United State* 
Steamboat Inspectors. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



[^ yo fTPRnnmbiii rrg»ti>^ 




Ask for this Label 
on Beer 



INT'L UNION OF 
UNITED BREWERY and 
SOFT DRINK WORKERS 

OF AMERICA 
Asks you to write and speak to your 






Umon 
naOf 
and 

toll led 

•»<i5^. or AneaicA Jti«r 



Ask for this Label 
on Soft Drinks 



STATE ASSEMBLYMEN AND STATE SENATORS 
WORK i\ND VOTE 

Against the Ratification of the National Prohibition Amendment 
to the Constitution 



&5A 
WORKERS UNIONy 



UNIOr^STAMPl 




Named Shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factoriei 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unleH it bean 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
Collis Lovely, Gen. Pres. Chaa. L. Baine, Sec.-Treaa. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Daniel Shean, last heard from at 
Cleveland, will kindly communicate 
with his brother, Richard Shean, 7014 
Ce-dar Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 

11-6-18 



For the benefit of the widow of 
John Karus, lost at sea, October 17, 
1918, at 2:15 a. m., according to the 
report in the official log of the bark- 
entine "Aurora," will all members of 
the crew of that vessel who know 
anything about the ship, the condi- 
tion of her rigging, before and after 
the accident, or anything that will 
tend to explain his disappearance, 
communicate with the undersigned 
attorney for the widow? — Silas Blake 
Axtell, No. 1 Broadway, New York 
City. 1-1-19 



A libel has been filed on behalf of 
the following officers and members 
of the crew of the steam-schooner 
"Florence Olsen" against the owners 
of the steam-schooner "Claremont" 
and the owners of the cargo, arising 
out of the salvage services performed 
by the "Florence Olsen" to the 
"Claremont" on or about the 31st 
day of October, 1918, oflf the coast 
of Nicaragua: George Muceneek, E. 
Kemfield, H. Julius, G. J. Borman, 
H. Nelson, Thomas C. Baird, S. A. 
Aim, Gaston Karlson, John Demliz, 
John Behrin, A. Von Sohendel, H. 
Hofstra, W. Christiansen, C. Ander- 
son. The members of the crew who 
have not yet filed their claims with 
the undersigned can be joined by co- 
libelants' petition. An adjustment of 
this salvage claim is expected very 
shortly and no time should be lost 
in filing claims. S. B. Axtell, Proc- 
tor for Libelants, 1 Broadway. New 
York City. 8-17-18 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



I have been informed that a num- 
ber of attorneys have requested 
members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Abangarez" to file claims for sal- 
vage services rendered to the bark 
"Ninfra." For the information of 
such seamen, it might be said that 
a settlement has been effected in the 
sum of $50,000 through an arrange- 
ment made by me as representative 
of a few of the crew, with the at- 
torneys for the owners of the 
'Abangarez." It is agreed that the 
crew shall receive one-fourth of the 
award, about $12,500. * All the crew 
need to do to get their money is to 
apply to the owners. Members of 
tlie union applying here can get 
their funds without any charge what- 
soever for services rendered by this 
office. S. B. Axtell, 1 Broadway, 
New York, N. Y. 6-18-19 



S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there is in TAIUORINQ 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTK — S. (i. Swanson Is not connerted 
with any dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes IVlade Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
20 Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th St. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Cal.' 



EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 



— or — 



A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D 8ts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAM8EN, Prop. 



Charles L. Carlsen, No. 1834, who 
disappeared from the barge "Isaac 
Reed" at Eureka, California, on De- 
cember 31, 1918, is inquired for by 
his wife, Mrs. C. L. Carlsen, 107 
Courtland Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING, SHOES. HATS. RUBBER 

AND OIL, CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eurel<a, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, Prop. 



Ingwald Johnson and Charles Mol- 
ler, members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Chehalis," on January 29, 1919, when 
Otto Peterson was injured, kindly 
report to the Secretary, Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal. 



Carl Hansen, a native of Soon, 
Norway, age 35, formerly a member 
of the Lake Seamen's Union, is in- 
quired for by his mother. Marn 
Hansen, 778 Sixth Ave.. Milwaukee 
Wis. 8-17-18 




DO YOU KNOW 

That War-Savings Stamps 
pay 4 per cent, compound in- 
terest? 

That W. S. S. cost $4.12 in 
January and one cent more 
each succeeding month of the 
year, reaching their highest 
price, $4.23, in December? 

That the 1919 W. S. S., 
known as the Franklin Issue, 
will be redeemed by the Gov- 
ernment on January 1, 1924, 
for five dollars? 

That the 1918 W. S. S. wUl 
be redeemed by the Govern- 
ment on January 1, 1923, for 
five dollars? 

That W. S. S. of either issue, 
if necessary, may be redeemed 
for value to date, as indicated 
on the W. S. S. Certificate, at 
any post office upon ten days' 
notice? 

That one thousand dollars' 
worth of W. S. S. is the maxi- 
mum amount allowed to any 
one purchaser? 

That Thrift Stamps cost 
twenty-five cents? And that 
sixteen Thrift Stamps are ex- 
changeable for an interest-bear- 
ing War-Savings Stamp? 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of L. C. S. Admiraal, a member of 
the Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Asso- 
ciation, last heard of in Rotterdam, 
Holland, 1914, will please notify his 
brother J. J. Admiraal, 51 South 
Street, New York, N. Y. 8-13-19 



Information wanted regarding John 
Johnsen, native of Bergen, age 44, 
last heard from in New Orleans, 
1917, was then on schooner "Lizzie 
M. Parson," going to France. Any 
information will be appreciated by 
liis brother, Andrew Johnsen, Sail- 
ors' Union, Seattle, Wash. 8-20-19 



Will Ingwald Johnson, Charles 
Moller, and any other member of 
the crew of the S. S. "Chehalis," on 
January 29, 1919, when Otto Peter- 
son was injured, kindly report to the 
Secretary, Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, San Francisco, Cal. 8-13-19 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Damages to the steamer "La Primera," sus- 
tained in a collision with the "Johanna Smith," 
off the Southern Oregon coast will riot amount 
to more than $5000, according to W. S. Scam- 
mell, manager of the White Flyer line. 

Williams, Dimond & Company, operators for 
the United States Shipping Board of vessels in 
a direct San Francisco to Europe run, will in- 
clude Rotterdam and Amsterdam as regular ports 
of call. The Ph. van Ommeren Company will 
act as the Dutch agents. 

Direct monthly steamship service between 
Vancouver, B. C, and Marseilles, Genoa and 
other southern European points, was provided 
for in a contract signed between Count Fayolle 
of Paris and representatives of the Norton Lilly 
Steamship Company of New York, and the 
Dingwall Cotts & Co. of Vancouver. 

Washington sawmills are filling an order for 
15,000,000 feet of merchantable fir lumber placed 
by Chinese buyers through the Douglas Fir Ex- 
ploitation Company. More than two-thirds of 
the big order has been placed with Puget Sound 
mills and a part of the material will be furnished 
from Grays Harbor. 

The 10,000-ton Norwegian motorship "Chris- 
tof?erson" is bringing a full cargo of nitrate 
from the West Coast for discharge at San 
Francisco and Tacoma. She is expected to reach 
Puget Sound the latter part of October. She 
will load either at Seattle or Tacoma for Eu- 
rope. 

Suggestion of a charter of the fifty odd 
wooden United States Shipping Board hulls, now 
laid up in Lake Union for houseboat purposes 
as a means of solving Seattle's housing prob- 
lem, is made by L. E. Davis. Davis points out 
that on each boat a large number of families or 
individuals could be accommodated near the 
heart of the city. A temporary bridge or a 
ferry, he says, would give quick and easy access 
to the shore. 

Announcement by the Shipping Board that it 
will not allocate any ships to Puget Sound to 
ply to South American ports via Los Angeles 
harbor is regarded as proof of the contention 
raised that there are already too many vessels 
operating thus. It is expected private lines will 
take care of all such business for a considerable 
time to come. 

A loan of $1,250,000 for the completion of 
the big drydock of the Los Angeles Shipbuild- 
ing and Dry Dock Company is soon to be 
floated, according to attorneys for the company. 
This was brought out at a City Council hearing 
to act on the appeal that the city cancel the 
company's lease in the harbor. Itwas explained 
the dry dock would have an initial capacity of 
12,000 tons, rather than 10,000 previously re- 
ported. 

The Los Angeles Harbor Commission is peti- 
tioned to join in a movement which seeks to 
obtain a revision of freight rates on an equita- 
ble basis. The petition comes from the joint 
transportation committees of the San Pedro, 
Wilmington and Long Beach Chambers of Com- 
merce. The matter will be presented to the San 
Francisco Freight Traffic Committee of the 
United States Railroad Administration. . 

Seven hundred thousand cases of canned sal- 
mon valued at approximately $7,000,000 has been 
brought to Seattle from Alaska by vessels of the 
Pacific Steamship Companv since the pack l)e- 
gan to move in July, according to representatives 
of the traffic department of the company. The 
amount of salmon moved by the company so 
far this year has been about the same as in 
1918, say officers. 

The T. K. K. Company announces increased 
rates for first-class and intermediate liners be- 
tween Honolulu and San Francisco and Hono- 
lulu and Japan, The rate on the "Tenvo Shinyo" 
and "Korea," first cabin, will be $100 and on 
the "Persia" and "Nippon" it will be $90. To 
Yokohama on the fast liners the rate will be 
$188. The old rate was $150, On the other 
liners the rate will be $169. The former rate 
was $155, 

Honolulu is experiencing a series of riots 
along her water front as a result of a strike of 
the stevedores. According to advices received 
the Filipinos who do the loading and discharg- 
ing of the ships have demanded an increase in 
pay from 35 cents to 40 cents an hour. The 
strikers were discharged and their places taken 
by free lances. It is announced that the workers 
are now strengthening their union and preparing 
to demand the same wage scale that exists at 
San Francisco and other Pacific Coast ports. 

Extensive harbor improvements, with the deep- 
ening and widening of the river channel from 
Portland to the mouth of the Columbia, are 
planned by the Port of Portland Commission 
and the Public Dock Commission. Resolutions 
have been adopted by the two organizations 
jointly, calling upon Colonel J. R. Slatterv. dis- 
trict engineer in charge of the local office of 
Ignited States army engineers, to recommend to 
Washington, D. C, that the channel from Port- 
land to the sea be dredged to a depth of 35 
feet and a width of 600 feet. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 



The information that Gray's Harbor now can 
accommodate 8000-ton steel steamers loaded to 
capacity is contained in an official report by the 
officers of the Government steamer "Col. Michie," 
which has been operating for three weeks on the 
bar and inner channel. The report says the 
channel at the bar has been deepened to 
twenty-four feet at low water and the inner 
channel widened from 150 feet to 200 feet. This 
bar depth and channel dimension is deemed fully 
adequate for handling the 8000-ton steel steamers 
loaded to capacity. Inner harbor work is still 
proceeding. 

While a greatly increased sum will be neces- 
sary to conduct the many activities of the Port- 
land Commission of Public Docks during the 
coming year that sum will be obtained by a tax 
levy increased only two-tenths of a mill over last 
year, according to the tentative budget approved 
by the commission. The fact that the municipal 
grain elevator and terminals at St. Johns will be 
at work and will require complete operating 
staffs, appears as the chief reason for the budget 
addition, while the commission is also faced 
with the necessity of redeeming some $50,000 
worth of outstanding bonds and paying interest 
on bonds recently issued. 

Bringing contracts for the installation and 
maintenance of wireless apparatus in the two 
score vessels of the United States Shipping 
Board at this port, T. M. Stevens, Pacific Coast 
manager for the Independent Wireless Telegraph 
Company, is in San Francisco. He is arranging 
for the establishment of Pacific Coast headquar- 
ters here, and for the opening of offices in Seat- 
tle, Portland and Los Angeles. The opening of 
stations will be held in abeyance until the official 
proclamation of peace when the company, ac- 
cording to Stevens, expects to develop its ser- 
vice both coastwise and transpacific. 

The Admiral Line is now operating the larg- 
est American fleet on the Pacific, according to 
official figures received from Washington. The 
company owns and operates twenty-three of 
its own ships and manages or operates forty 
for the United States Shipping Board, This is 
by far the most numerous fleet controlled by 
any individual concern on the Pacific, it is said. 
The company',s development of business into 
the Orient is due to the fact that more than a 
year ago a number of representatives were sent 
across the Pacific and numerous agencies es- 
tablished. This insured return cargoes and this 
made it an easy matter to have the Shipping 
Board vessels assigned. The Government has 
gone on record that in the case of the Pacific 
no ships will be assigned unless assurance is 
received that they will not return to this coun- 
try with empty holds. 

The Spreckels yacht "Venetia" has shifted 
from Mare Island to the Moore Shipbuilding 
Company to be re-conditioned and overhauled. 
The vessel had a oit of hard knocking about 
while doing duty for Uncle Sam and it will 
require the expenditure of a considerable sum 
to completely restore the craft. It was an- 
nounced here recently that the Government is 
not paying out of hand the complete bill for 
restoring all of the vessels commandeered for 
war service. In some cases only one-half of 
the estimated cost of repairs is paid and the 
balance will have to be collected throu.gh action 
brought against LTncle Sam. The Moore com- 
pany has agreed to get the "Venetia" back in 
service in seven weeks. It is believed that ex- 
tensive repairs will have to be made to the 
ship's bottom because of a severe shaking up 
received when one of the depth bombs was 
exploded. 

The San Francisco schooner "Casco," bound 
on a mysterious gold-hunting expedition to the 
Kolyma river section of Siberia, was wrecked 
on King Island, about 40 miles from Nome, 
September 8, during a southeast gale. Captain 
C. L. Oliver was badly injured, but the twenty- 
seven members of the crew and party aboard 
were landed safely on the island, according to 
a report reaching Nome. The "Casco," once 
the property of Robert Louis Stevenson, was 
forced by the gale on the rocks at the south 
end of the island. The vessel was said to be 
in a precarious position. The ship's stores were 
landed on the island and the coast guard cutter 
"Bear" is proceeding to effect a rescue of the 
crew and stores if possible. The "Casco" left 
Seattle during the summer and when last heard 
from was north of Cape Berdzekamen on the 
far northern Siberian coast, where it was ex- 
pected the vessel would pass the winter. Hcavv 
ice in the Arctic and storms, it was reported, 
during August forced the "Casco" away from 
the cape. The wrecking of the schooner now 
on King Island is taken here to mean that the 
"Casco" came southward from the point where 
it was originally intended to winter. 

F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of ail seafarers careful attention, 324 
Merchants Exchange Bldg., 3r<l Floor. California 
St., nr. Montgomery. Phone, Sutter 5807 (Adv.) 




Afrillated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 

and 

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS' FEDERATION. 



THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 
328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago, III. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS: 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON. Mass PERCY J. PRTOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 
Branches: 

BALTIMORE, Md ADOLF KILE, Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 
NEW YORK CITY....GUSTAVE H. BROWN. Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA. Pa... OSCAR CHRISTIANSEN, Agt. 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va DAN INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS. Va T. NELSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 

MOBILE. Ala w. F. CATTELL, Agent 

681/2 South Michael Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La o. MORTENSEN. Agent 

4001/2 Fulton Street 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex D. F. PERRY, Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 
PROVIDENCE, R. I H. BLANKE, Agent 

T-Tio-PT AXTT^ J^^ ^°"*^ Water Street 

PORTLAND, Me C. MARTELL, Agent 

5 Exchange Street 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, N. Y 12 South Street 

H. P. GRIFFIN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary- Treasurer 

Telephone Bowling Green 8840-8841 

New York Branch D. E. GRANGE. Agent 

514 Greenwich Street 
Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass J. A. MARTIN, Agent 

6 Long Wharf 

NEW ORLEANS, La R. T. KAIZER, Agent 

228 Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK, Va WM. QUINN. Agent 

54 Commercal Place 

NEWPORT NEWS WM. J. SIGGERS, Agent 

127 Twenty-third Street 

BALTIMORE, Md F. R. STOCKL, Agent 

802-804 South fernadwav 

PHILADELPHIA. Pa..O. CHRISTIANSEN, Sub. Agt. 

206 Moravian Street 

MOBILE, Ala C. RAVING, Sub. Agent 

104 South Commerce Strppt 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex...G. SCHROEDER, Sub. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex J. CLAUSEN, Sub. Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 70 South Street 

Telephone John 975 and 976 
New York Branches: 

NEW YORK, N. Y 164 Eleventh Avenu* 

BROOKLYN, N. Y 110 Hamilton Avenue 

Branches: 

PHILADELPHIA. Pa 138 South Second Street 

RALTTMORE, Md 802 South Brnndway 

NEWPORT NEWS, Va 123 Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR. Tex W Pronfor Strpet 

GALVESTON, Tex 321% 20th Street 

BOSTON. Mass 3 Long Wharf 

NOnFOTJ<:. Va 513 East Main Street 

NE^V ORLEANS, La 400% Fulton Ptreef 

MOBILE, Ala 60% St. Michael Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 492 South Water Street 

PORTLAND, Maine 5 Exchange Street 



FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON. Mass 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Branches: 

GLOUCESTER. Mass 163 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y .TOHN R. FOLAN. Agent 

111 South Street 

PORTLAND, Maine WM. HOLLAND, Agent 

IS Commercial Wharf 

PROVINCETOWN, Mass 

FRANK L. RHODERICK, Agent 

Commercial Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. Y 

HARRY F. MrGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 
NEW BEDFORD. Mass, CHARLES E. DOUCETT, Agt. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE QREA1 LAKES. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO. Ill THOS. A. HANSON. Treasurer 

328 W. Randolph Street. Phone Franklin 278 

BUFFALO N, Y GEORGE HANSEN, Agent 

55 Main Street, Phone Seneca 5588 

CLEVELAND, O GEO. L. MARTIN. Agent 

.SOS W. Superior Aven\ie, Phone Main 1842 

MILWAUKEE, WIS....CHAS, BRADHERING. Agent 

162 Reed Street 

DETROIT. Mich K. B. NOLAN. Agent 

44 Shelby Str»et, Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 47 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO. O S. R. DYE. Agent 

704 Summit Street 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. O JOHN MORRIS. Agent 

992 Day Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. T 

PATRICK O'BRIEN, Ajent 

122% Main Street, Phone 890 

SOUTH CHICAGO, Til 9214 Harbor Avenue 

Phone South Chicago 1599 

SUPERIOR, Wis 832 Banks Avonut 

(Contlnu*4 on Fa«e 11.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The 


Seamen's 


Journal 


Publ 


shed weekly at San Francisco | 




BY THE 






SAILORS' UNION OF 


THE 


PACIFIC 




Established in 


1887 





PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

B. A. SILVER Business Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Offloe, Maritime Hall Building, 

69 Clay Street, San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To ln.=ure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for In Section IIO.'J, Act of Octo- 
ber 3, 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided tliey are of gen- 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDXF.SD.W, OCTOBER 8. 1919. 



SAPPING THE SEAMEN'S ACT. 



A bill known as H. R. 8069 was introduced 
in the House of Representatives about two 
months ago by Representative Rowe of New 
York. 

The Rowe bill purports to be a measure 
designed to induce more Americans to go 
to sea. and to adopt seagoing as their regu- 
lar profession. \\'hat it would really effect 
if enacted into law would be to materially 
lower both the individual and the collective 
standards of efficiency of ships' crews. 

Briefly, -Mr. Rowe's bill proposes to amend 
section 13 of the Seamen's .\ct by shorten- 
ing from three years to six months the time 
to be served at sea by native Americans, 
graduated from a Shipping P>oard training 
ship, to qualify them for the rating of able 
seaman. 

A further amendment of the section in 
cjuestion provides for a reduction in the num- 
ber of able seamen in a ship's crew from the 
present percentage of 55 to 20 per cent, in 
the first year, 30 per cent, in the second year, 
and 40 per cent, in the third year, "after the 
approval of this Act," and thereafter 50 per 
cent. 

The first result of these amendments, if 
ajiproved by Congress, would undoubtedly be 
to make American seamen distinctly inferior 
in the matter of professional efficiency to the 
seamen of other maritime nations. This 
mainly because of the proposed reduction in 
the number of able seamen to be carried. 
There is such a thing as an irreducible mini- 
mum, and the percentage of able seamen in 
a ship's crew prescribed by the Seamen's Act 
comes pretty near being that when considered 
in its relation to the general safety of 
navigation. 

It is not at all certain, either, that the 
proposition to reduce from three years to six 
months the time of service at sea required to 
qualify as an able seaman will have the effect 
anticipated by its sponsors; to wit, inducing 
more native Americans to go to sea. That 
is. if the six-month A. B. is to receive the 
same rate of wages as the three-year one. 
Rather is it likely to have just -the opposite 



effect. The great majority of American ship- 
owners are of the plain, garden variety of 
homo sapiens. One rather prominent trait 
of the species is an obstinate insistence at all 
times on getting 100 cents' worth for ever>' 
dollar expended. When American shipown- 
ers find that they are required to pay the 
same wages to men who have had only six 
months' experience at .sea that they have to 
pay to men who have had three years' or 
more experience, no one understanding human 
nature need be in doubt as to which class of 
seamen they will give the preference. The 
fact that the less experienced men are na- 
tive Americans will absolutely cut no figure 
in the matter. There is notoriously no sen- 
timent in business. And. from the viewpoint 
of the shipowner, hiring .seamen is just a 
l)lain matter of business. 

The chief parties behind the Rowe bill, as 
might be expected, are the officials of the 
.Shipping Board's Recruiting and Training 
Service and the Sea Service Bureau. It is 
also said to have some backers among the 
members of the American Shipowners' Asso- 
ciation. These gentlemen are probably still 
smarting from the drubbing they got in their 
last fight with the organized seamen on the 
-Xtlantic and Gulf Coasts, and think they see 
in the Rowe bill a means of getting even 
with their vanquishers. But, for reasons al- 
ready pointed out, it is more likely to prove 
a boomerang. 

That the latter possibility has suggested 
itself to other parties in interest .seems to be 
indicated by the stand taken by the shipown- 
ers on the Pacific Coast with reference to 
the bill. Without e.xception they are all op- 
posed to the changes in the Seamen's Act 
proposed in the Rowe bill. Their contention, 
to quote from the San Francisco Chronicle. 
is that "the American merchant marine does 
not need additional able seamen bad enough 
to .sacrifice the possibilities of having com- 
petent men turned out. At present there is 
available a sufficient number of new men to 
answer the requirements, and the proposition 
of speeding up the wheels is not looked upon 
with favor." 

On top of this comes Captain John Leale, 
head of the San Francisco Sea Service Bu- 
reau, and says that there is no longer any 
difficulty encountered in securing recruits for 
the sea service. The training ship "Iris" is 
now running to nearly full capacity, and it is 
seldom that the vessel has less than 300 stu- 
dents aboard. From all of which, plus the 
reported attitude of the House Committee on 
Merchant Marine and Fisheries towards the 
measure, it appears tolerably certain that the 
Rowe bill will not have any too smooth 
sailing. 



MORE AIDS TO NAVIGATION. 



The port of New York has for upward 
of two years now had what is known as a 
compass control station, supplemented by 
four compass stations. The control station 
is at New York, and the four compass sta- 
tions are located respectively at Sandy Hook, 
Matoloking. Fire Island and Fire Rock. 

These stations were installed by the United 
States Hydrographic Office for the purpose 
of safeguarding entrance to the port of New 
York by vessels approaching the coast dur- 
ing foggy weather. The system employed 
is said to be very simple, but efficient, and 
works out somewhat as follows: 

A ship gets, according to her reckoning, to 
a point, say, 100 miles or less from the 



control station. If the navigator is uncertain 
as to the exact position of the vessel he 
orders the wireless operator to send out the 
query "Q. T. F." meaning "What is my 
po.sition?" He next proceeds to sownd his 
dots at short intervals for about a minute 
or so. This enables the operators at the four 
compass stations to detect the exact angle 
or direction from which the wireless waves 
come, and they immediately report back to 
the ship her true bearings from their re- 
spective stations. 

The rest is easy. The navigator simply 
lays the various bearings across his chart, 
and the point where they all converge will 
mark the exact location of his vessel. As 
a matter of fact, careful and exhaustive ex- 
I)eriments have proved that the position thus 
ascertained is never more than 100 feet 
from being exact, even at a distance of 
100 miles. 

The value of such a system to ships trying 
to make port in foggy weather is too ob- 
vious to need any enlarging upon. It is 
therefore of more than passing interest to 
us on the Pacific Coast to learn that Captain 
Joseph Tibbett, the well known master ma- 
riner of these parts, who recently returned 
to San Francisco from the East, has a 
.seemingly well founded hunch that the U. S. 
Hydrographic Office will soon get busy con- 
structing a number of compass control sta- 
tions on this coast. Let us hope that his 
hunch will turn out to be true, for with 
this added safeguard of navigation there is 
bound to be a tremendous slump in the 
number of .shipwrecks on the Pacific Coast, 
"a consummation devoutlv to be wished." 



OUR TREATY WITH MEXICO. 



.\rticle 21 of the treaty of peace and amity 
concluded between the I'nited States and 
Mexico on l-'ebruary 2. 1848. is as follows: 

If unhappily .tny (li.sagreement should here- 
after arise between the governments of the 
two republics, whether with respect to the in- 
terpretation of any stipulation in this treaty, or 
with respect to any other particular concerning 
the political or commercial relations of the 
two nations, the said governments, in the name 
of these nations, do promise to each other 
that they will endeavor, in the most sincere 
and earnest manner, to settle the differences so 
arising, and to preserve the state of peace and 
friendship in which the two countries are now 
placing themselves; using, for this end, mutual 
representations and pacific negotiations. And if, 
by these means, they should not be enabled to 
come to an agreement, a resort, on this ac- 
count, shall not be had to reprisals, aggression, 
or hostility of any kind, by the one republic 
against the other, until the government of that 
which deems itself aggrieved shall have mature- 
ly considered, in the spirit of peace and good 
neighborship, whether it would not be better 
that such difference should be settled by arbi- 
trations of commissioners appointed on each 
side, or by that of a friendly nation. And should 
such course be proposed bv either party, it 
SHALL BE ACCEDED TO BY THE OTHER, 
unless deemed by it altogether incompatible 
with the nature of the difference or circum- 
stances of the case. 

It does not seem possible that the United 
States, after having spent billions of dollars 
and hundreds of thousands of lives to up- 
hold the princii)le that treaties between strong 
and weak nations are not to be regarded as 
mere "scraps of paper" at the will of the 
stronger, .should intend to stultify herself to 
the extent of an armed invasion of Mexico, 
as demanded by the interventionists, without 
having e.xhausted all peaceable means of com- 
ing to an understanding. 

.At any rate, the Journal most emphatical- 
ly refuses to believe that any such course 
will be followed ! 



In union there is strength, but beware how 
you use that strength. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OBITUARY. 



The ranks of the "Old Guard" of the Sail- 
ors' Union of the Pacific are thinning fast. 
Yet another of that devoted little band of 
fighters for justice, Christ. C. Simonsen, has 
passed on to "the undiscovered country, from 
whose bourn no traveler returns." 

Comrade Simonsen departed this life on 
the 3rd inst. in San Francisco at the age of 
60. He was a native of Denmark and un- 
married. During some of the most troublous 
years on San Francisco's waterfront he 
served the Sailors' Union of the Pacific ably 
and faithfully as a patrolman. From 1910 
up to the time of his death he was a valuable 
and valued employe of the California State 
Harbor Commission. He leaves behind him 
a host of sorrowing friends and old ship- 
mates. Peace be to his ashes; rest to his soul. 



On this page, in the adjoining column, 
you will find a plain, unvarnished statement 
by Comrade "Pete" Gill of the doings of 
"Hell-fire" Pedersen and his precious sons, 
the mates, on their last voyage in the "Puako." 
Nothing much worse than those doings is to 
be found in the "Red Record," published in 
the Journal twenty-five years ago when Wal- 
ter Macarthur was editor. If you can read 
Comrade Gill's story of the "Puako" brutali- 
ties without experiencing a fierce desire to 
lynch the Pedersen brutes we miss our guess 
by a whole string of miles. The reading of 
that tale of horrors is almost enough to 
make one doubt that the world is really 
growing better. The more so when the light 
sentence given the scoundrelly trio is taken 
into account. Eighteen months ! Six months! 
And just think of it ; immediately after being 
sentenced they were all released on bail 
pending an appeal of their case to a higher 
court! If precedent counts for anything the 
court of appeal is as likely as not to set 
••j.side the verdict of the lower court. Truly, 
the man who first named them "courts of 
justice" must have been a humorist of the 
Artemus Ward type. 



Andrew Furuseth has been appointed by 
the Shipping Board on a committee made 
up chiefly of labor men and shipowners. The 
work of the committee will be to formulate 
a set of recommendations looking to needed 
revision of the navigation laws, more partic- 
ularly the inspection laws. The appointment 
of Furuseth on the committee is, of a cer- 
tainty, a clear case of putting the right man 
in the right place. 



The fishing industry which is owned by 
the State of New South Wales now oper- 
ates six modern deep-sea fishing trawlers 
equipped with cold storage plants. Cold 
storage supply depots are constructed at 
suitable places along the coast and the 
fish are marketed through State fish depots 
or shops at prices considehably less than 
those charged by independent sellers. 



The use of language to disguise thought 
has never been more clearly exemplified than 
in the temi "subsidy," meaning the appropria- 
tion of public mone3's to private purposes. 
The real idea involved could be more cor- 
rectly expressed by a word of less length 
and much wider currency. 



What's become of the old-fashioned sailor 
who used to think it unlucky to go to gea 
with any money left in his pockets? 



"PUAKO" CASE BRIEFLY REVIEWED. 



Comrade P. B. Gill Presents Resume of Prin- 
cipal Facts in the Case as Brought Out 
in Court. 



Editor's Note: In last week's Journal we 
mentioned that Captain Pedersen of the bark- 
entine "Puako," and his two sons, serving as 
mates of the vessel, had been found guilty in 
the United States District Court at New York 
of having illtreated their crew. News has since 
come to hand that Captain Pedersen has been 
sentenced to eighteen months in the Atlanta 
penitentiary, and the two mates to six months 
each in a local New York prison; also that they 
were all released on bail pending an appeal. 
The Statement. 

This vessel was manned by Capt. Adolph C. 
Pedersen, 1st Mate Leonard Roy Pedersen, 2nd 
Mate Adolph Eric Pedersen, Carpenter Wm. 
Mattson, Cook John Henry Stewart, Seamen 
Peter Jorgensen, Bjarne Olsen, Axel Hansen, 
James Campbell, Frank Greeland, Wm. Jones, 
Lester Jensen, Ed. Riley, Jack Joe, John W. 
Campbell, Cabin Boy L. A. Smithson. 

The vessel left Victoria, B. C, April 27th, 
1918. On May 3, Frank Grecian was beaten by 
the captain and mates and put in irons without 
food for twenty-four hours. 

From the beginning of the voyage to Alay 
23rd, John H. Stewart, the cook, was assaulted 
and beaten and when he could stand abuse no 
longer, lie jumped overboard and was drowned. 
On May 3rd, or thereabouts, William Jones was 
beaten at the wheel by the Captain. On June 
25th, the cabin boy, L. A. Smithson, was beaten 
by the captain and mates and put in irons. He 
was again beaten on July 4th and July 12th. 
On July 13th Lester Jensen was beaten by the 
captain and mates. On the same night Wil- 
liam Jones was knocked unconscious and P. 
Jorgensen was taken in the cabin and beaten. 
Lester Jensen was beaten three times this day 
and night. On July 25th Frank Greeland was 
beaten and put in irons for five weeks. On July 
30th Axel Hanson was taken in the cabin and 
beaten mercilessly by the captain and mates 
and placed in irons. He was let oi.'t to work 
on his watch on deck and kept prisoner on his 
watch below until August 6th when he could 
stand the agony no longer and jumped over- 
board about 6:30 a. m. The vessel was then 
going about five knots an hour and when Han- 
son struck tlie cold water, he came to his senses 
and grabbed the log line. The helm was put 
down and the captain called on deck. When 
he came on deck he asked Jack Joe, who was 
at the wheel, where he was going (the vessel 
was then coming up in the wind) and was told 
that Hanson was overboard. The captain then 
said. "To hell with the man overboard. Keep 
the vessel on her course." This was done 
and Hanson had to let go the log line and was 
drowned. Before Hanson jumped overboard, 
he was struck by the mate. Edward Riley was 
prevented by the captain from pulling in the 
log line in an attempt to save Hanson; the Cap- 
tain exclaiming, "Let the B D drown." On 

July 31st Lester Jensen was again beaten by 
the captain and mates. An August 12th Bjarne 
Olsen was beaten by the captain and mates and 
never recovered from this beating till he died in 
the hospital at Capetown, South Africa. The 
doctor's certificate stated that he died of pneu- 
monia but the fact is that the beating he re- 
ceived was the prime cause of. his death. 

On August 10th and 18th, Lester Johnson was 
again beaten and put in irons. On August 19th 
the cabin boy and seamen William Jones, Peter 
Jorgenson and Jack Joe were beaten. On Au- 
gust 20th James Campbell was beaten and put 
in irons. When these men were placed in irons 
they were always put in the pump well and 
water pumped on them. On August 23rd and 
24th, William Jones and Jack Joe were again 
beaten. These men were all beaten with belay- 
ing-pins, marlinspikcs, brass knuckles, heavers 
and guns, and between serious beatings were 
continuously knocked about by the officers. 

No regular watches below were given and the 
last two weeks no watches at all were had by 
any of the crew. 

On July 31st, the captain, realizing that he 
might get in trouble at the end of the voyage, 
concocted a scheme to save himself and made 
out statements to the efifect that the sailors were 
German spies, L W. W.'s and Bolsheviks, and 
that they were paid by German agents to wreck 
the vessel and kill the ofificers. He made all 
hands sign that these statements were true at 
the point of a gun and kept them in irons and 
beat them till they signed the statements rather 
than be tortured to death. 

The vessel arrived at Capetown, South Africa, 
on August 27th, 1918, and the crew were taken 
ashore and placed in jail. They were kept in 
jail nine davs when they were taken to the Im- 
migration Station. The crew then gave out 
statements that caused the arrest of the captain 
and mates for murder. 

On January 6th, 1919, the captain and mates 
were sent to New York to stand trial, and the 
carpenter and eight seamen were taken to New 
York as witnesses. The trial for murder re- 
sulted in acouittal of the captain and mates. 
They were then held for assault and the trial 
(Continued on Page 10.") 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 6, 1919. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping dull with plenty of members 
ashore. Nominated delegates to the 23rd An- 
nual Convention of the International Seamen's 
Union of America, to convene at San Francisco, 
January, 1920. J. Faltus tendered his resigna- 
tion as the agent of the Honolulu Branch of 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific. F. A. Peterson 
was elected agent for the unexpired term. 

JOHN H. TI':NNIS0N, 

Secretary pro tern. 
Maritime Hall BIdg . 59 Liay Street Tel. 
Kearny 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 29, 1919. 
No meeting. Shipping slow. 

J. LTCHELLS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 
Street. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 29, 1919. 
Shipping good. 

W. G. MILLARD, Agent. 
58 Powell Street E. 1'. U. Box 1365. Tel 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 29, 1919. 
Shipping medium. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 29, 1919. 
.Shipping quiet. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent pro tem. 
84 Seneca St, P. O. liox 65. )el. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 29, 1919. 
Shipping good; men scarce. 

ED KOSENBERG, Agent. 
P. O, Box 280. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 29, 1919. 
Shipping fair; prospects" medium. 

TACK ROSEN, Agent. 
SSVi Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 29, 1919. 
Shipping fair; men scarce. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128'/2 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 22, 1919. 
Shippine dull; prospects poor. 

F. A. PETERSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 2, 1919. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping slack. The report of the 
Quarterly Finance Committee, finding stubs, bills, 
cash on hand and in banks correct, was read and 
adopted. Nominations of ofificers for the ensu- 
ing term and delegates to the International 
Seamen's Union Convention were proceeded 
with. 

EUGENE STETDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 595S. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 26, 1919. 
Siiijiping medium. 

J. LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock. Room 203. P. O. Box 
214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 24, 1919. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; few members 
ashore. 

JOE MACK, Agent. 
613 Beacon Street. Phone Sunset 336. P. O 
Box 54. 



DIED. 

Christ. C. Simonsen, No. 7, a native of Den- 
mnrV age 60. Died at San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 
3, 1919. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 

(By Laurence Todd.) 



A photograph of the dead body of a 
woman, showing the bullet wounds which 
took her life, was thrown down in front of 
the chairman of the Senate Committee on 
Labor, yesterday morning, by John Fitz- 
patrick of Chicago, chairman of the Na- 
tional Committee to organize the Iron and 
Steel Workers. 

"Did the Steel Corporation make war^ 
upon us? Did they shoot?" he cried.* 
"Look at that, Senator Kenyon, and see for 
yourself. That is the way we found the 
body of one of our organizers, Mrs. Fannie 
Sellons, after these gunmen had got 
through shooting. 

"Do you want to know what happened? 
Well, this woman was standing near where 
a man sixty years of age was acting as 
picket in a coal mine strike, right in the 
steel district. She saw the company gun- 
man shoot this old man down. She saw 
some little children run out of a yard near 
by, and get into the line of fire. She ran 
out, gathered them in her arms, and pulled 
them back to the fence, out of the way of 
danger. The order was given, 'Kill the 
woman, too!' The gunman fired again, and 
shot her dead. The Mayor of that town, 
who is also the magistrate, held the mur- 
derer in $2500 bail ; but he held one of our 
men, for attempting to make a public 
speech to steel workers, in $3000 bail." 

This was one of the sections of Fitzpat- 
rick's testimony which was not widely re- 
ported by the score of newspaper men 
present. Nor did they emphasize the story 
of the murder of four strikers by the com- 
pany gunmen at the plant of the Standard 
Steel Car Co. at Hammond, Indiana. They 
were murdered in cold blood, Fitzpatrick 
testified, on the day after President Marrick 
of the Chicago Association of Commerce 
had publicly declared that the way to deal 
with labor was to adopt the slogan of the 
tank corps, and "Treat 'em rough." When 
the coroner's jury was ready to investigate 
the cause of the deaths, the witnesses from 
among the strikers were thrown into jail 
and prevented from testifying. 

It was acts of murder and of terrorism 
such as these, Fitzpatrick told the commit- 
tee, that led up to the climax when the rep- 
resentatives of the twenty-four international 
unions involved cast their unanimous vote 
against any postponement of the great steel 
strike. Ever since the beginning of the or- 
.ganizing campaign in the summer of 1918 
the steel companies had used every means 
within their power to prevent the slaves in 
the mills from lifting up their eyes and see- 
ing that they could fight their way to free- 
dom. Gradually, as the number of or- 
ganized men increased, the bitterness of 
the persecution was intensified. When or- 
ganizers went into the Pittsburgh district 
they met the flat denial of their right to 
free speech or free assemblage, even though 
they rented a vacant lot or a hall. Jail and 
fines were dealt out to those bold enough 
to challenge the local authorities who acted 
for the steel trust. And after jailings and 
fines and threats came-tlubbings and out- 
right killings. 

Samuel Gompers, testifying to-day, said 
that at the urgent request of President Wil- 
son he repeatedly advised the committee of 
spokesmen of the 24 internationals to post- 
pone the strike until after the President's 



October industrial conference. But he said 
further that he was convinced that the com- 
mittee was fully justified in its decision that 
action could not be postponed. 

"If the leaders had ordered a postpone- 
ment, under the terrible conditions of op- 
pression, of violence and of general terror- 
ism created by the steel corporation," he 
said in substance, "many would have gone 
out on strike anyhow. It was a choice be- 
tween their going out under the guidance 
of experienced and intelligent and cool- 
headed leaders, and letting them go out 
without leadership, with the result that 
they would have to find leaders from among 
their own number." 

^^'illiam H. Johnston of the Machinists, 
along with several other heads of interna- 
tionals, had sent word to the committee in 
Pittsburgh before the final meeting, advis- 
ing delay. But when they heard the re- 
ports of the organizers vipon the desperate 
frame of mind of the men, and the lengths 
to which the struggle had already gone be- 
fore the actual beginning of the walkout, 
not a man present continued to believe any 
delay possible. 

^^'hat will the Senate investigation 
amount to? 

Nothing, probably, beyond showing that 
the autocratic will of Chairman Cary of the 
United States .Steel Corporation is more 
effective in determining the destiny of the 
.\merican working class, just now, than the 
will of the President of the United States 
and all the committees, commissions, con- 
ferences and boards that can be framed up 
to talk about it. Gary has power. He has 
])Ower in Pittsburgh and Birmingham and 
Pueblo and Joliet and a hundred towns be- 
tween. He has power in Congress, power 
in the administration, power in the State 
and county governments, power in his own 
private army of gunmen. His mayors and 
State constabulary in Pennsylvania are not 
a bit more serviceable than his newspapers, 
his Congressmen and his hired propagan- 
dists in Ohio or in Illinois or Alabama. He 
speaks for organized capital, and his ma- 
chinery for getting his words obeyed is too 
solid and extensive to be disturbed by any 
public oi)inion which may be kicked up by 
an inquiry in the Senate. 

The only member of the Senate commit- 
tee except Chairman Kenyon, by the way, 
who showed any real interest in the testi- 
mony, was Phipps of Colorado. Phipps de- 
scribes himself in the Congressional Direc- 
tory as a former vice-president and treas- 
urer of the Carnegie Co., and in the Wall 
Street Journal for April 17, or thereabouts, 
1917, he is listed as one of the largest in- 
dividual stockholders of the United States 
Steel Corporation. His holdings at that 
time were listed as 2,900 shares of common 
and 500 shares preferred, or a total, at 
par, of $3,400,000. Whether he is, as cur- 
rently reported here, a vice-president of the 
Colorado Fuel and Iron Co., does not ap- 
pear in his own statement. But his steel 
stock and his former position in Pittsburgh 
prove that he is quite impartial as a member 
of the Senate Committee on Labor. 

Speaking of impartial Senators naturally 
brings up the name of Senator Elkins of 
West Virginia, one of the members of the 
Committee on Interstate Commerce that is 
trying to enact the infamous Cummins anti- 
strike law for the 2,000,000 men in railroad 
service. This Elkins is a son of the late 
Stephen R. Elkins, coal baron and feudal 



lord of the regions known chiefly to indus- 
trial America through the machine-gun and 
bayonet work of the company guards in 
Paint Creek, Cabin Creek and other mining 
districts. It is the present Elkins who had 
active charge of the Elkins properties and 
their gunmen when Mother Jones was being 
run out of the State, or was being jailed 
and threatened with death. 

There are enough trade union men and 
women in Colorado to send a labor spokes- 
man to the Senate in place of Steel Cor- 
poration Phipps, and to send another labor 
man next fall in place of Senator Thomas, 
who has been spouting denunciations of the 
steel strike and demanding that strikes be 
punished as crime. There are enough or- 
ganized workers in West Virginia to estab- 
lish a modern republic there. And if ever 
there were a time when working class 
voters must have a right to be ashamed ot 
having loaded political feudalism upon their 
own shoulders that time is now, when these 
Senate "investigations" are going on. 

Take a look into the meeting room of 
the Committee on Interstate Commerce. 
There sit eight or ten lawyers and business 
men, and among them is just one man who 
feels the slightest sympathy with the labor 
struggle. "Bob" LaFoUette is with the rail- 
road workers to-day just as he was with 
the Seamen when they were slaves of their 
ships ; but every other man around that 
committee table is trying to figure out some 
way to jam down the lid, once more, on 
"industrial unrest." 

Poindexter of Washington and Pomerenc 
of Ohio are just as eager to trap Glenn 
Plumb or Warren S. Stone into threatening 
violent revolution, as are Elkins or Under- 
wood or Kellogg of Minnesota. Townsend 
of ^Michigan scowls as harshly as does Rob- 
inson of Arkansas'. Stanley of Kentucky is 
as hopelessly blind to the swift approach of 
the imperative demands of the American 
workers as is Wolcott, the lawyer from 
darkest Delaware. A trade unionist feels 
in that room as though he were listening to 
the mutterings of old men from a past and 
musty generation — ghosts of far yesterdays. 

And Stone, head of the Railway En- 
gineers, tells them frankly that they'll 
never pass the anti-strike scheme, nor any 
of the other most reactionary features of 
the Cummins bill. He laughs in their faces, 
and tells them that men who have fought 
for liberty abroad will not hesitate to de- 
fend their own liberty at home. If Con- 
gress violates constitutional rights of labor, 
then labor will protect the Constitution. 

.'Ml of which goes to show that this Con- 
gress is composed of the wisest, most intel- 
ligent and most properly representative of 
men ! 



It is believed that there arc only three 
mats of ivory in existence. The largest 
one measures eight by four feet, and, al- 
though made in the north of India, has a 
Greek design for a border. It is used only 
on state occasions, like the signing of im- 
portant state documents. The cost of this 
precious mat was almost incalculable, for 
more than 6400 [)ounds of pure ivory was 
used in its construction. Only the finest 
and most flexible strips of material could 
be used, and the mat is like the finest 
woven fabric. 



The suicide rate of Germany was before 
the war the highest in the world — twenty- 
one in 100,000 yearly. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



HAS LABOR GONE MAD? 



I 



It would almost seem that a fratricidal 
madness afflicts the Labor Movement at 
the present time. 

Wherever we meet together it is to fall 
savagely upon one another, and rend and 
tear with a jungle-like ferocity. 

Our capacity for quarreling has some- 
thing of the insanity of genius in it. No 
matter is too small to be made the subject 
of a row. We exhibit a perverse ingenuity 
in discovering reasons for dissension. 

And this at a crisis in our history de- 
manding mutual forbearance and fraternal 
unity ! 

What's wrong with us? Are we unfit 
to be the advocates and guardians of a 

great cause? 

* * * 

The recent State Labor Conference in 
Sydney was a spectacle to make the angels 
weep, and move the devils to laughter. 

Instead of being a triumphant demon- 
stration of working-class solidarity, it was 
one long snarl, one continuous wrangle, 
with bared fangs and claws, ending in an 
open declaration of war. 

And now, as a sequel to that sorry afifair, 
we have had a conference of malcontents, 
and another party has been brought into 
being, to further advertise our wretched in- 
ability to stand together in the face of a 
common foe. 

Arc we really mad? Or are we the pup- 
pets of a malevolent fate? 

* * * 

The malcontent conference failed to jus- 
tify its existence. It said nothing and did 
nothing that made it worth while. 

It produced an objective in every way 
inferior to that of the Federal Labor Party 
as a statement of working-class aims, and 
absolutely futile as a guide to working- 
class methods. 

What, for instance, is the meaning of the 
third section of that objective : "Opposition 
to all forms of legislation likely to retard 
the abolition of Capitalism"? 

It might be contended that measures im- 
proving the conditions of the workers un- 
der the present system would be "likely to 
retard the abolition of Capitalism," by 
making the workers more satisfied with 
their lot. Indeed, there are Socialists who 
do so contend. 

Arc we to understand that the members 
of the new party will oppose "^meliorative 
legislation, such as an increase in the old 
age pension, or the provision of work as a 
right for the unemployed? 

Are they believers in the doctrine of in- 
tensifying misery as a goad to working- 
class action? 

Or is the section of their objective which 
is quoted above a piece of meaningless 
babble, as I suspect? 

Anyway, however that be, it makes one 
sad to see so much genuine militant en- 
ergy expending its force to no good purpose 
in this breakaway misadventure. 

Within the official Labor Movement it 
could have rendered useful service. It is 
needed there, to counteract the conservatis- 
ing tendency that is a feature of every es- 
tablished institution, and supply it with 
new ideals and fresh incentives. 

Outside the official Labor Movement it 
represents a pitiful waste, and a further in- 
citatioji to disunity. 

The Unions and Leagues that sent dele- 



gates to the conference would do well to 
let the matter end there. 

Having thus expressed their deep dis- 
satisfaction with A. L. P. Executive acts, 
they had better let it rest at that, and de- 
vote themselves to the task of lifting up 
the Labor Party to the level of its oppor- 
tunities. 

Never had militant ardor such a chance 
before. Combine it with the restraint of 
the "moderates," and the two together 
could win Australia for the workers. 

And yet, with Imperialism threatening 
us, with Militarism trampling on our lib- 
erties, with Capitalism looting our homes, 
we do nothing but fight one another, and 

give great joy to our enemies. 
* * * 

Have we gone mad? Are we the puppets 
of a malevolent fate? 

Or what is the matter with us? — H. E. B. 
in Australian Worker. 



THE BIG SPLASH. 



Even a small frog can make considerable 
commotion in a small puddle. But when 
he flops into a river, he never makes a rip- 
ple. In this country, we have made a good 
deal of a fetish of the word "millionaire." 
Some people speak of them with bated 
breath. Their lot is regarded with envy. 
Their power is magnified until it appears 
supernatural. 

Yet a millionaire is only a mighty small 
frog. He may raise quite a wave in his 
own particular little muddy puddle but 
when he jumps into the sea of nation-wide 
and world-wide finance, he never even 
makes a splash. For a Millionaire is only 
One Man. 

There are, in round numbers, 100,000 mil- 
lionaires in the United States. 

But there are more than 30,000,000 wage 
earners in this country. 

The war proved that the millionaire no 
longer holds a commanding place in world 
finance. Before the war there were but 
300,000 holders of Government securities. 
Now, however, there are nearly 30,000,000 
individual holders of Liberty Bonds, War 
Savings Stamps and Savings Certificates. 
Those figures make it evident in what 
hands the financial power of the United 
States lies. 

The Government has placed a limit of 
$1000 on the purchase of War Savings 
Stamps of each year's issue. If each of 
the 100,000 millionaires bought that limit 
they would raise for the Government $100,- 
000,000. But if each of the workers of 
America invested but $1 a week, they 
would pile up the tremendous sum of 
$1,.S60,000,000. They would make fifteen 
times as big a splash as all the millionaires. 

Those are the financial possibilities that 
confront the workers of this country. Tre- 
mendous financial power streams through 
their pay envelopes like a waterfall. All 
that is necessary is to direct that waterfall 
into a channel of saving and harness it to 
the motor of thrift. 

That can be done in no better way than 
by steady regular purchase of War Savings 
Stamps, Savings Certificates and Liberty 
Bonds at their present market prices. 
Those securities are safe, they earn good 
interest and with them you can turn on 
your power when and where you want to 
apply it. 

W^hen the workers jump into the sea of 



finance through those means. There Will 
Be A Big Splash. 

BUY W. S. S. 



The population of the Azores is about 
245,000, the number of inhabitants having 
changed but little in the last century, and, 
if anything, having diminished. This fact 
is ])robably due more to various political 
and social conditions than to climatic, agri- 
cultural, and other conditions of the islands. 
In the early days the Portuguese literally 
"raised cane" on the islands, and estab- 
lisJied A large sugar trade with England 
and other countries. Tobacco and fruits 
were also produced in great quantities, but, 
with the discovery and settlement of Brazil 
and other South American countries, Por- 
tugal rather discouraged production in the 
Azores in order to aid her colonies in 
South America. With the sugar and to- 
bacco trade snatched from them, the Azor- 
eans began the cultivation of the vine and 
the making of wine and other liquors be- 
came one of the chief industries of the 
islands. The population consists mainly of 
Portuguese, Moorish, and Flemish settlers, 
with a few negroes and a fair sprinkling 
of English settlers. 



In Labrador, sealskin shoes are made for 
the dogs, who, attached to sledges, travel 
at great speed over the rough ice and need 
some protection for the feet. 

Labor's Economic Platform 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more thaii eight hours 
in tlie twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or 
compartments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
;is will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



sideration makes the total cost of 21 
articles of food, upon which this com- 
parison is based, the highest on record." 

The bureau further shows that since 
August, 1918, prices have increased 12 
per cent., and that during the six-year 
period, from August, 1913, to August, 1919, 
food prices increased 91 per cent. These 
figures disprove most conclusively the 
claim that is being made in certain quar- 
ters that the cost of living is decreasing, 
and is misleading and apparently given 
out for the purpose of deceiving the pub- 
lic. Except for meats, which show slight 
decreases, price increases were in the 
articles most largely used. 

The increase in August prices took 
place during the height of the Govern- 
ment's campaign to reduce living expenses. 
At the same time, all official records 
show that wholesale prices and prices 
paid producers fell slightly. That puts 
the responsibility for the increases on 
the middlemen and retailers. 



Emigration Only Normal 

The hysteria that existed in the minds 
of many bankers and employers of cheap 
labor just after the signing of the armi- 
stice, caused by a widely circulated story 
that millions of foreigners would imme- 
diately leave their homes and take with 
them about five billions of their savings, 
is not verified by the report just issued 
by Commissioner General of Immigration 
Caminetti. His statement shows that 
only 102,513 foreigners have left the United 
States since the armistice was signed and 
a total _ of only 123,522 during the 12 
months ended June 30, 1919. 

For the five years ended June 30, 1919, 
618,225 emigrants departed, as compared 
with 1,172,679 immigrant arrivals for the 
same period, the statement points out, an 
excess of arrivals over departures of 554,456. 

"Rumors that 1,500,000 foreign residents 
were preparing to leave for their native 
countries, taking with them $5,000,000,000, 
have disturbed this country," the state- 
ment says. 

"The exodus is perfectly natural, and, 
as is usual in normal times, many will 
return." 



Increases Deferred 

Xo wage increases will be granted at 
this time to navy yard employees or work- 
men in shipyards engaged on Government 
work, representatives of the Emergency 
Fleet Corporation and the Navy Depart- 
ment decided at a conference held at the 
Navy Department. 

After the conference the following state- 
ment outlining the attitude of the conferees 
was issued : 

"In view of the decision of the President 
in the case of railroad employees that the 
general subject of readjustments in the 
existing wage scales be deferred pending the 
efforts being made af the present time to 
bring the cost of living down to normal. 
and in view of the general desire to take 
no action which would in any way interfere 
with a return to more normal conditions 
throughout the country, it has been decided 
to continue the existing scale paid in Navy 



yards and shipbuilding plants doing Govern- 
ment work in effect after October 1. 

"This scale is the last of the so-called 
Macy Board awards. This will apply to the 
cast and west coasts, Great Lakes and Gulf." 



Recall Adamson Law 

The oft-repeated yarn that the railroad 
brotherhoods forced Congress to pass the 
Adamson law under threat of strike was 
denied by President Stone of the Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Engineers while oppos- 
ing tlie Cummins railroad bill which would 
prohibit strikes of these employees. 

Tlie story was recently denied by for- 
mer President Garretson of the Order of 
Railway Conductors before a Senate com- 
mittee. 

President Stone took occasion to refute 
this yarn when a Senator repeated it. The 
brotherhood executive said : 

"I want to challenge that statement. I 
am acquainted with every move made by 
the railroad employees in that campaign, and 
I now declare that we did not want the 
Adamson law ; it was not our bill and we did 
not urge its passage. At the request of the 
President we (the four executives) and 600 
general chairmen waived our original de- 
mands. We didn't like the Adamson law 
then and we don't like it now." 



Concentration Desired 

Reducing the number of Government 
employees making statistical researches is 
sought by Chairman Good, of the Plouse 
committee on appropriations, in an amend- 
ment to first deficiency appropriation bill 
autliorizing the Bureau of Efficiency to 
investigate the scope of statistics required 
by the Government and the methods of 
compiling statistical information by the sev- 
eral executive departments. 

"About ten different agencies of the Gov- 
ernment are collecting information on the 
consumption of coal," explained Good. "Eight 
different agencies are collecting infonnation 
on the distribution of coal. Six different 
agencies are collecting information on the 
exports of coal and the same on imports. 
We had nine different agencies collecting 
information on price of coal. Now some- 
thing ought to be done to bring practical 
sense to bear upon the methods of collecting 
statistical information." 



Fatalities Increased 

According to reports received by the 
Bureau of Mines from the state mine inspect- 
ors of all States except Kentucky, 276 men 
were killed during June in and about the 
coal mines of the States reporting, as com- 
pared with 222 in the same States in June, 
1918; thus the figures show an increase of 
54 fatalities from the records of the previ- 
ous year. The increase was due to two big 
accidents during the month, one at the Dela- 
ware and Hudson Coal Company, near 
\\'ilkes-Barre, Pa., causing the death of 92 
men, and the other at the Rock Island Coal 
Mining Company, Alderson, Okla., which 
resulted in 15 men losing their lives. 



Amsterdam Conference 

The report of Samuel Gompers, Daniel 
J. Tobin and John J. Hynes, delegates to 
the Amsterdam conference of the Inter- 
national Federation of Trade Unions, will 
be published in the October issue of the 
American Federationist. 



It is a most complete resume of the 
proceedings and should be read by every 
trade unionist. 

The success of the American Federation 
of Labor delegates in advancing the cause 
of labor the world over along the lines fol- 
lowed by the trade union movement of this 
country was complete. History will desig- 
nate this conference as the truning point 
toward practical progress in the European 
trade union movement. 



Cost of Living Report 

The Bureau of Statistics of the Depart- 
ment of Labor in a report just made public 
presents an interesting discussion of the 
high cost of living problem for families 
whose incomes aggregate from $1200 to 
$1500 in the high cost of living schedule 
of 91 selected cities in all parts of the 
LTnited States. A family with the income 
indicated expended during the past twelve 
months an average of $594 for food. In 
Boston the expenditure was $579, in Balti- 
more $547, in New Orleans $539, in Pitts- 
burgh $535, in Philadelphia $533, in Chicago 
$523, in Kansas City $514, in San Francisco 
$514. in Cincinnati, $504, and in St. Louis 
$497. 

"The average annual expenditure," says 
the report, "for food by all the families in 
all the cities listed was $511. The largest 
sum, $624, was spent in Fall River, IMass., 
and the smallest sum, $427, in Savannah, 
Ga. The cities having the smaller expendi- 
tures for food are for the most part in the 
Middle West, with some in the South. 



St. Helena has belonged to Great Britain 
since 1861. In the days of sailing vessels 
it was a flourishing port of call, and there 
mariners purchased provisions to continue 
the voyage to Africa. But with the coming 
oi steam its trade has dropped off, until 
in 1907 but fifty-seven vessels called there. 
The population is about 3000, and is Eng- 
lish, Portuguese, East Indian, and African, 
with an English governor. Jamestown is 
the only town, and it is three and a half 
miles from Napoleon's home at Longwood. 



According to the latest available figures, 
the religions of the world are divided as 
follows: Christians, 564,510,000; Confu- 
cianists and Taoists, 300,830,000; Moham- 
medans, 221,825,000; Hindus, 210,540,000; 
Animists, 158,270,000; Buddhists, 138,031,- 
000; Shintoists, 25,000,000; Jews, 12,205,000; 
unclassified, 15,280,000. 



"PUAKO" CASE BRIEFLY REVIEWED. 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



set for August 2nd, 1919, but was delayed until 
August 18th and again till September 2nd, when 
a jury was selected and the case proceeded with. 
The General- and Vice-Consuls from Capetown 
and the Immigration Inspector of the same place 
were also subpoenaed and appeared in New York 
for the U. S. Government. The case closed on 
the 19th of September and went to the jury. 
After a couple of hours' deliberation the jury 
returned a verdict of "Guilty." The Pedersens 
were defended by Dudley Field Malone and the 
U. S. was represented by Assistant U. S. Attor- 
ney Lawrence Miller. 

Too much credit cannot be given Mr. Miller 
for the able manner in which he conducted the 
case and his address to the jury was brilliant. 

Great credit must also be given to the crew 
who suffered considerably by delay and loss of 
work, but they were determined to stay to the 
end and see justice done. 

Stenographic reports on the case can be had 
for about $70.00 and I recommend that same 
be purchased. 

Respectfully submitted. 

P. B. GILL. 
Fifth Vife-President I. S. U. of A. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



SABOTAGE BY PRIVATE OWNERS. 



The following letter from a railroad 
employe is not an exceptional revelation, 
but typical nf reporfs Railroad Democracy 
is receiving from other quarters. It is such 
conditions as this letter discloses which 
show that a Government investigation is 
essential. Sabotage by the agents of the 
private owners to defeat efficiency and 
economy under Government control has 
plainly been practiced with uniform suc- 
cess, and along uniform lines. A probe is 
the first duty of a Congress interested in 
the welfare of the people. The letter is 
written from a prominent railroad center, 
and says : 

"Almost daily we read and hear about 
the great and steadily growing deficit 
brought about by the railroads being under 
Government control. Various reasons for 
it are being put forth, and it is possible 
that those reasons are correct. The aver- 
age man is not well enough posted on 
such matters to contradict them. However, 
there are times when we wonder if there 
are not other causes in addition to those 
already stated which may have in a meas- 
ure helped to bring about this deficit. 

"For instance, in the yards at this point, 
prior to the time that the Government took 
charge, there were four yardmasters, and 
this at a time when business was excep- 
tionally good. Shortly after the Govern- 
ment took hold of things, this force was 
increased to ten men, and they arc still 
there, all drawing substantial salaries. We 
used to get along with two or three train- 
miasters, with an occasional extra put on 
for special duty. Now there are four or 
five, and the extras. The road foreman of 
engines had one or two assistants, and 
now there are five of them. 

"In the various shops at this point they 
had one or two foremen. Now they have 
as high as fifteen or twenty and even more 
in some of the shops, and in some cases 
the foreman has only one or two men 
working under him. In some of the offices 
the clerical force has been doubled and 
even trebled, and in one particular office 
only a short time ago they had so many 
clerks that they were continually getting 
in one another's way. Various official and 
supervisory positions have been created 
and the holders of them have been on a 
substantial salary. 

"The material sheds and yards are filled 
to overflowing with material of all kinds, 
cars loaded with it are being held out of 
the service for days at a time, because the 
men in charge do not know what to do 
with it and where to put it, and still it 
keeps coming. A foreman some time ago 
stated that they have enough on hand to 
last them for the next five years. What 
do they intend to do with it, and of what 
good will it be if it is not used up and 
allowed to lie around in the weather for 
the next three or four 3'ears? 

"And there are other matters which 
might be mentioned in connection with 
this. Some time ago a man was needed to 
fill a temporary vacancy in a clerk's posi- 
tion which paid $120 per month. To fill 
the position an employe whose salary was 
$190 per month was taken from his regular 
position and used to fill the $120 position, 
and given a couple of days in which to 
post up on the work. To fill his position 



a $160 employe was moved up and allowed 
the higher rate of pay, and to fill the 
vacancy thus created a $140 man was 
moved and allowed the higher rate, and all 
the time there was a $120 clerk available 
v.ho had worked the first named position 
and was acquainted with the work. 

"After a certain class of em])loyes had 
been given the eight-hour day they v/ere 
for a long time kept working twelve hours 
and paid for the overtime at overtime 
rates, and were told that men were not 
available to relieve them, and at the same 
time men applying for positions were being 
told that men were not needed. 

"\\'hat I have written is partly the result 
of my own observations and partly what 
I have heard from other men, not once, but 
many times. I have heard the Director- 
General talk on economy, and have read 
the various letters and circulars which 
have been issued from time to time, and 
these other things look strange indeed. 
There may be very good reasons for all 
this of which we may be ignorant. It is 
hardly to be expected that an ordinary 
employe should understand such matters, 
but it looks very much like a case of 
'saving at-thc spigot, and wasting at the 
bunghole.' 

"I have written of these matters in a 
general way only, but I feel if they were 
investigated in a proper way some inter- 
esting facts in connection with the deficit 
might be brought to light. 



BUY W. S. S. 



The International Photo-Engravers Union 
of North America in convention at St. 
Louis, has pledged its members to whole- 
hearted support of the savings campaign 
conducted by the Government and to in- 
vestment in Government savings securi- 
ties. The resolution adopted by the Na- 
tional convention declares that thrift is an 
essential for stimulating freedom of action 
and independence on the part of wage 
earners and that Thrift Stamps and War 
Savings Stamps furnish a safe, sound and 
guaranteed method of safeguarding their 
earnings. 

The resolution follows closely the form 
adopted by the American Federation of 
Labor, of which Matthew WoU, president 
of the Photo-Engravers, was one of the 
authors. The resolutions read : 

"WHEREAS, The war so happily ended, 
has required our people to develop thrift 
and saving which to some degree has stim- 
ulated freedom of action and independence 
on the part of some wage-earners; 

"AND, WHEREAS, It is essential to 
stimulate thrift and savings in time of 
peace as in time of war ; 

"AND, WHEREAS, The inauguration 
of the national system of War Savings and 
Thrift Stamps has afforded to some of 
small earnings a safe, sound and guaranteed 
method of Government investment of their 
hard earned savings ; 

"TFIEREFORE, Be it resolved that this 
convention do approve of the continuation 
and extension of the War Savings and 
Thrift Stamps Institution, or the substitu- 
tion of a National Savings Institution akin 
in character and method, which shall prove 
helpful to safeguard the earnings of the 
toiling masses of our country." 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Page 5.) 
LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone, Seneca 48. 

THOS. CONWAY, Secretarj-. 

ED HICKS, Treasurer. 

Branches: 

ASIITABC'L.A. HARBOR, Ohio 74 Bridge Street 

Phone, 428-W. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 332 Banks Avenue 

Phone Broad 131. 

CONNBAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 9214 Harbor Avenue 

Phone, S. C. 1599. 

TOLEDO, Ohio 704 Summit Street 

Phone, Main 4519. 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1012 Superior Avenue 

Phone, Main 866. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone, South 598. 

DETROIT, Michigan 44 Shelby Street 

Phone, Cadillac 543. 

CHICAGO, III 332 N. Michigan Ave. 

Phone, Central 8460. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122i^ Main Street 

Phone, 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 V^est Eagle Street 

Telephone Seneca 896. 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary. 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 406 N. Clarlt Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABUl^ HARBOR, Ohio 85 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 704 Summit Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MAR! 
LIEF STATIONS ON 
Marine 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROr 

Relief 
Ashland, Wis. 
Aslitiihula H.-.rbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
luilutli, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven Mich. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Houghton, Mich, 
l.udington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
JMenominee, Mich. 



NE HOSPITAL AND RE- 

THE GREAT LAKES. 
Hospitals: 

T, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 
Stations: 

Ogdensburg, N. T. 

Oswego. N. Y. 

Port Huron, Mich. 

Manitowoc, W's. 

Marquette, Mich. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

Saginaw, Mich. 

Sandusky, O. 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Sheboygan, Wis. 

Superior, Wis. 

Toledo. O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1365 

TACUMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 2S* 

POUTLANlJ, Ore 88% 3rd Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal • P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal 58 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 876 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal. ..613 Beacon Street, P. O. Box B7« 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 
SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 54 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 138 



Demand the union label. 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters. 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 968 

KETCHIKAN. Alaska P- O. Box 201 

PETERSBURG Alaska 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Ore P- O. Box ISI 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION. 

'^AN FRANCISCO Cal 9 Mission Street 

Phnne Sutter 2205 



MARINE FIREMEN'S AND OILERS' UNION OF 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

VANCOTTVER. B. C :«9 Columbia Avenue 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

B. C. COAST STEWARDS. 
VANCOUVER. B. C 6»» Rlchard» itr^rt 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Three of San Francisco's leading 
hotels have signed with Cooks' 
Union No. 44, fixing the wage scale 
at rates ranging from $22.50 to $55 
per week, according to the class 
of work. 

No representation of the United 
States in the International Labor 
Conference to be held at Washington 
on October 29, as provided in the 
Peace Treaty, could be arranged for, 
said Secretary Wilson in a recent 
statement, until the treaty had been 
ratified. 

One of the last acts of the annual 
convention of the United Mine Work- 
ers, just closed, was to endorse the 
formation of a National Labor Party. 
This action was taken in order to 
help "change the political complexion 
of the American Congress and as- 
sure the workingman of the United 
States a voice in the power of gov- 
ernment." 

The Pennsylvania capitalist news- 
papers are helping to keep junkerism 
enthroned. To render their patriot- 
ism beyond suspicion, they print the 
American flag on the top of their 
sheets, and then gloatingly relate 
how hundreds of "loyal" citizens are 
being sworn in as special deputies 
to "keep order" during the steel 
strike. These citizens, "mostly busi- 
ness men," will, according to these 
papers, be "armed to quell disturb- 
ances" and in some cases will "be 
given firearms." 

San Francisco chauffeurs went back 
to work last Wednesday afternoon, 
ending their one-day strike, after an 
agreement had been signed by the 
employers' association at 4:30 p. m., 
agreeing to the wage demands of 
the drivers. The scale was advanced 
from $4 a day to $5. A reduction in 
hours from nine to eight, which was 
supposed to be a part of the orig- 
inal demand, was not pressed at the 
conference between the two sides 
and no changes were, made in this 
respect. 

The Prussian methods of the Mc- 
Keesport, Pa., city officials are ably 
seconded by the Chamber of Com- 
merce, which is trying to intimidate 
the workers by leaflets calling atten- 
tion to the loss of wages in other 
industrial centers due to strikes. As 
an example is given the case of 
Jamestown, N. Y., where it is claimed 
that the workers "lost through out- 
side agitators total wages to July 
19th, $567,000." The handbill admon- 
ishes the workers to "let your better 
judgment and influence reject the 
work of agitators who are trying to 
use the same tactics and methods in 
McKeesport that caused Jamestown, 
N. Y., to lose nearly a million dollars 
in wages." 

A union of newspaper writers, af- 
filiated with the International Typo- 
graphical Union, has been organized 
in Rochester, N. Y., and demands 
have been presented to the publish- 
ers of the four Rochester daily pa- 
pers for a minimum salary of $50 a 
week for experienced reporters. 
More than three-fourths of the re- 
porters in the city have already 
joined, and many others, including 
desk men, have made application for 
membership. The first test of the 
loyalty of the men to their new or- 
ganization came when one of the 
dailies made overtures to the scribes, 
offering them the increased wages 
demanded, provided they withdraw 
from the union. This the reporters 
flatly turned down. 



Offica Phone Elliott 1196 



EJsUbllshed 189* 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Date Methods In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

COMPASSES AUJUSTED 

712-13-14 SEABOARD BLDG. FOURTH and PIKE STREETS 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Sjul (~\l( Xr J> C See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
"* V-* Iv Hi XV O box in which you are served. 

^feaS^SS^^^g^Ss^^X^^'stPT. I88CX -?XS ^ 

Issued by AulhO'il/oi the Cigai Makers Interna' jnal liniotTofAmerica 

Union-made Cigars 

U^hiS (£Pl1rflf$ '1*1 th« C>qi(k cori4,tit<i 'r>ih>% be* ru*« M(« rn«(It t^i 'llStlUSS mKWft 
aHEMflTROr 1H[ bCWMWtlQ'iNIIElNATiOPUl UNIChoi Amtr>C4. jn orufUitXM drvoted ^tht id 

vdncfinrmof the tK)f^K nUTtRiAiindinrudnuAi <vUfAR{ OF TKFCRah Tto/«v«m>K«nwwH 

^ tiVM 0*^'\ (O 111 VKtAsn UtrOi«h(»/t tM NO'ld I 

AO Mf«9«aMUi«9oii this lite mii at pumtfwd tccofdin^ ta iMC 



f' }Y. (/hl4ti:ti4. PtradeKt. 
V CUIUnf 



Seattle, Wash , Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofllce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agenoy at Seattle can 
not de held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mail tonvarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mail until arrived. 

Aase, Olaf Anderson, Sextes 

Abrahamson, HelftanAndersson, Gustav 
Abolin, K. Andersen Alf. -1G3S 

Abrahamson, John Anderson, Albert 
Anderson John (6) Andersen, Olaf -209S 
Adams, A. D. ^ndersen, Herman 

Anderson Adolf (4) Anderson, John N. 
Anderson Harry (2) Anderson, Julius 
Anderson, Chris Andewig, H. 
Anderson, John -ISOOAntonsen, Martin(3) 
Andresen, Jorgon Akerstrom, O. R. 
.Anderson, Albert Antonsen, Anton G. 

H. (2) Alquist, Cris 

Anderson, Charles Alexis, H. 
Andersson W. (2) Aspengreen, E. 
Anderson Rasmus 



Bang, Oskar 
Backlund, K. 
Backman, Axel 
Backstrom. F. 
Belmont. Joe 
Berg, Wm. 
Beversdorf, E. 
Bertleson, Bertie J, 
Bergkvest, Axel 
Berentsen, A. M. 
Berkland, Hans J. 
Bibbs, Golden S. 
Bjorseth, K. 

Campbell, John 
Camino, C. C. 
Carlson, Herbert 
Carlsen, Gust. 
Carlin, Carl A. 
Cartveit, C. C. 
Carlson, Gus. 



Bjorkstrom, A. 
Bloomgren, Adolf 
Bodie, Wm. 
Boyle, James E. 
Bolstad, Alf. 
Borgan, Arne 
Brown, Calvin H. 
Bratson, Jos. 
Bruce, Albert 
Brun, Dick 
Burgiss, J. W. 
Bund, Nils 
Burggraf, Albert 

Carlson, C. A. 
Carlson, Chas. H. 
Carlson, Gunner 
Carstensen, Carsten 
Casperson, Carl 
Carruthers, M. 
Clausen, Christ. 



Carlson, Oscar -454 Corron, George R. 
Carlson, John -1586 Cochrane, Robt. 
Carlson. Ingwald Cortes, P. 
Dahl, Ole Ditmanson, D. 

Davies, Chester O. Dreyer, J. 



Davies, E. R. 

Delaney, John 

Dehler, J. 

Dekker, D. 

Enoksen, A. 

Eliassen, H. O. 

Elstad, John 

Klzo, CmfI 

Ellis, J. 

Elling, Alfred 

Forevaag, C. 

Fair, Plialtl 

Feedge J. A. 

Ferguson, Robt. 

Felsch, C. 

Flatten. James ' 

Flemming, M. 

Gabrielsen, P. 

Onmber, J. J. 

Gerson, Chas. 

Gibler, Karl 

Hanson, Olaf 

Hanson, Andrew 

Hansen, John P. 

Hanson, Josef 

Hanson, Peter 

Hanson, G. E. 

Hanson, John 

Halley. Wm. 

TTaraldson. Johan 

Halseth, Ed. 

Inglebretsen, Olaf Isakson, Karl 

Iverson, Andrew Iverson, Ole 



ruinwnody. George 
Douglas, W. 
Dunn, W. G. 
Dutton, H. 
Elisen, Sam 
Evsner, Ingvar 
Erikson, Erik 
Erikson, Otto 
Erickson, K. 
Erickson, J. R. 
Fox, Andrew 
Folks, H. 
Fuve, A. M. 
Fuidge, E. W. 
Franson, O. 
Fredrecksen, F. 

Groth, Karl 
Grunbock, John 
Gusjons. O. 
Gustafsson, O. 
Hasselborg. Gus. 
Henrekson, E. 
Hendreckson, H. 
Hoik, Geo. 
Holmquist, Einor 
Holland, J. 
Hill, F. 

Hilliard, C. R. 
Hunter, G. H. 



Jacobson, Johan 

Janson, E. A. 

Jansen, Emll 

Jensen, Nils 

Jensen, Henry 

Jensen, Hans 

Johnson, A. W. 

Johansen, Ed. 

Johnsen, Jacob 

Johansen, J. 

Johnson, Peter M. Johnson, P. 

Johansen, Karl -2127 



Johnson, E. 
.lohnson, Peter -2313 
.Tohnsen, A. 
Johanson, Jakob 
Johnson, G. 
Johnstone, Walter 
.Johansen, Karl 
Johnsen, John 
.Tohnsen, Adier -2565 
Johanssen. Erik 



Karlstrand, G. 
Kasti, H. 
Karlson, K. 
Karlsen, O. 
Korsama, N. J. 
Kallio, F. 
Karlsen, E. 
Kempson, M. 
Larsen, Hjalmer 
I^arsen, Segurd 
Larsen, G. 
Lampl, F. 
Larsen, Alex 
Larsen, C. A. 
Larson, E. G. 
T-arson. Fred 
Lee, C. 
Leskenen, F, 



Kines, J. H. 
Knudson, A. J. 
Koppen, O. 
Kother, H. 
Koppen, B. 
Kristiansen, .1. 
Karhanan. E. 
Kutin, John 
Leeuwen, A. V. 
Lul, T. 

Leeravacg. H. J 
Lldston, C. 
Lorgeman, F. 
Lund, Wm. 
Luetter, T. 
Lundberg, K. 
Lundgren, C 
Ludersson. W. 



1240 



Mortensen, K. A. 
Malhesen, Segurd 
Mortensen, H. 
Martindale, John 
Mardinsen, C. 
Malmqvist, C. 
Manus, Johanus 
Mordison, A. 
Malone, B. 
Mercer, H. 
Meckelson, J. 
Melby, V. 
Meloen, Harry 
Melder, Albert 
Meskelsson, Erik 
Mikkelsen, K. -16: 



Emil 
Carl 
A. C. 
A. W. 
John 
Robert 



Chris 
Nlc 
Albert 
Adolph 
Ferdinand 
Laurits 
Arne 
Robert 



1379 



Nelson, 
Nelson, 
Nelson, 
Nelson, 
Nelson, 
Nelson, 
Olsen, 
Olsen, 
Olsen, 
Olson, 
Olsen, 
Olnes, 
Olsen, 
Olsen, 
Pakki. Einil 
Paaso, A. 
Paterson, P. 
Paklesen, K. 
Permin, Jens C. 
Pederson, E. P. 
Petterson, Adolf 
Pederson, Carl 
Pestoff, S. 
Peterson, Karl E. 
Rasmussen, Christ 
Rantenen, H. 
Reenhold, Gustov 
Robenson, W. N. 
Rosenberg, Adolf 
Sandberg, Otto 
Sandel, F. S. 
Sather, H. 
Sassi, W. 
Schmidt, W. 
Schuur, H. 
Seppala, Emll 
Seyfried, M. 
Shoberg, J. 
Simmons, John 
Smith, Emil 
Sodwick, Ben 
Sorenson, H. 
Solberg, Olaf 
Taice, John J. 
Tapper, A. E. 
Tessabia, B. 
Thorsen, Herman 
Thammeson, Ole 
Thorsen, Hans 
Thorsen, Victor 
tlhlnes, F. 
Vesgood, Jens 
Ward, D. 
Waggoner, Sam 
Walters, Al 
Walters, Ted 
Watt, John B. 
Weld, L. A. 
West. J. N. 
Winter, Theodore 



Miller, Frank 
Miller, A. M. 
Morrison, J. D. 
Morken, M. L. 
Moore, J. 
Morrison, Wm. 
Morgan. Wm. 
Moor, Thos. 
Moen, Robt. 
MacKay, James 
McGuire, T. 
McKenzie, D. J. 
McGuire, J. 
MacKay, Thos. 
McGregor, J. 
OMcCoy, James 

Neilsen, Axel 
Noren, B. 
Nord, C. W. 
Nilsen, Andreas 
Nilsen, Hans L. 
August 

Hans 
C. 

Carl 

John 
Otterspear, Wm. 
Overland, Oskar 
O'Keefe, T. F. 



Nimen, 

Olsen, 

Olsson, 

Olsen, 

Olson, 



Pearson, Gustov 
Pederson, John 
Pettersen, Bjorne 
Pedersen, Karl 
Pelta, Henry 
Peterson, Ole 
Plantiko, W. 
Powell, H. 
Porter, A. 
Punis, A. 
Rosenthal, W. 
Rohman, G. 
Rosenblad, Albin 
Rund, Nils 

Sorenson, Tom 
Sorger, E. 
Strand, Alfred 
Stentz, P. 
Steffensen, S. 
St. Clair, Thomas 
Stratton, M. 
Suominen, F. 
Sundby, Alfred 
Sverdrup, Thorwald 
Svendson, John A. 
Swanson, Wm. 
Syverscn, Oskar 

Thorn, Arvid 
Tonneson, Anton 
Tomquist, Henry 
Troverson, Louis 
Tyrrell, J. 
Tuorilla, J. 



Voldby, P. 
Wil.son, Gus 
Wilson, C. 
Witbberg, Alf 
Williams, Lloyd 
Wilhelmsen. Martin 
Wirta, Geo. 
Wullum, J. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List* 



Vnderson. Andrew 
,\ndersen, Olaf 
Rarrot, G. 
Brandt, Arv. 
Burmeister, T. 
Brun, Mattia 
Brant, Max 
Brandt, H. 
Parlson. Osc. 
Cormack, W. C. 
Dischler, P. 
Gomes. M. G. 
Hedrick, .Tack 
Jansson, John 
lansson, .T. A. 
Jensen, Joe 
Johanssen. John F. 
Johannessen, Alf. 
.Tohannessen. Jonas 
Johnson, Hllmar 
Khamp. 8. 
Kinnunen. AnttI 
Kpnnedv J R. 
Lutke, F. C. A. 
Malkoff. Peter 
Malmberg, E. 
Martinson. Adolph 



Melners. Herman 
Miller, F. 'U'. 
Miller, Walter 
Murk, Chas. 
N'pvvnian, 1. 
Nystrom. R. 
Olesen, W. 
Olson. A. 
Olson, W. 
Olsen, Alf 
Patterson. E. G. 
Pedersen, N. B. 
Petersen, Axel 
Rahlf, J. 
RIsenlus. Sven 
Rosenblad, Otto 
Rubins, C. A. 
Smvth, J. B. 
Soderlund, TJno 
Stalt, Axel 
Stanbeck, A. 
Sven son. B. 
Rundqulst. Walter W 
Torln. Gustaf A. 
Valfors, Arvld 
Wllltams. T. C. 



HONOLULU LETTER LIST. 



Childs, Clinton S. 
Dryer, O. 
Esrenes. Nils 
Etherton, Ward 
.Tohnston, John G 
Ingebertsen. Olaf E 
Jones. E. J. 
Josephson. Wm. 
Sewied, Ericht 



Larsen, .Tohn 
Krcger. Lloyd F. 
Klint, Herman 
MItchel. H. A. 
Cseven letters) 
. MakI, Kaune 
Geer. Van Harry 
Nielsen. Christian V- 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER A. HATTER 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

Store No. 1 — Cor. Main and Tlrst 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pine 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Creamatory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Jroadway at Olive St. East 1S 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. 8. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats. Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 
Room 4140 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

S15-817 First Ave. Opp. Totem Po)« 
SEATTLE. WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



WESTENHAVER BROS. 



CUT-RATE STORE 

$5.00 Less on a Suit or Overcoat, 
Shirts. Shoes, Oil Skins, Rubber Boots, 
Overalls, Underwear, Sox, Pants. 

We make a special effort to carry 
In stock everything for 

SAILORS and MILL MEN 

UNION STORE 

208 East Heron St., - Aberdeen 

Between Re.x and Wear Theaters 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

8TOCX OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATB, 

SHOES. COLLARS. SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, 8HIRTII 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street • AbardMIl 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors" Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measurc 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F. Sts., Aberdeen, Wash, 
lat and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 263 



"Ole and Charley" 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors' Rest" 

Cigars. Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
219 EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 




Poverty 
is A Crime! 

IT isn't a crime to be poor, any more 
than it is to be murdered. The poverty- 
stricken man is not a criminal. He 
ia a victim of a crime for which others 
as well as himself are responsible. Henry 
George 33 years ago gave a lecture be- 
fore the Knights of Labor the title of 
ivhich wag 

"The Crime of Poverty'' 

It has since become a classic and haa 
touched the spark of ambition in the 
hearts of thousands of men and inspired 
them to better things. 
You can get a copy of this gripping lec- 
ture, well printed in a neat, cloth-bound 
book, and THE PUBLIC, A Journal of 
Democracy, for 13 weeks for only 65 
cents. Let THE PUBLIC be your in- 
terpreter, aa it is for many of the great 
liberal thinkers of the day : Brand Whit- 
lock, U. S. Minister to Belgium ; Wm. 
C Colvcr, Federal Trade Commissioner; 
Ray Standard Baker, and hundreds o£ 
others. 

Frank P. Walsh, Joinf-Chalr- 
nan of the National War Labor 
Board says; 

Every worker in America should 
be a subscriber to THE PUBLIC. 
All lovers of justice are striving 
toward the same end. THE PUB- 
LIC points the way. 
Write your name and address clearly on 
the margin, attach 65 cents, stamps or 
money order, and with the first number 
of THE PUBLIC we will send you a 
cloth-bound and handsomely printed 
copy of "Th» Crime of Poverty." 

THE PUBLIC 

122 E. 37th St., New York City 



Portland, Or., Letter List 



Amundsen, Ben 
Anderson, Albert 
Anderson, C. 
Ahren, Wm. J. 
Barkman. Peter W. 
Bieler. B. 
Bohm, Kranz 
Boyle, H. 

Christensen, E. H. 
Chrlstensen, H. P. 
CunninRham, G. F. 
Dalil, Louis 
De IX)nK, K. 
Duret, J. E. 
Ellegaard, M. 
Elliot, Austin A. 
Erickson, John E. 
Gulldersen. W. E. 
Geiger, Joe 
Graaf, John D. 
Hanson, August 

-1134 
Harding. Ellis 
Hartman. FHtz 
Hauschlld, B. 
Heino, Gust. 
Hellman, H. W. 
Henrlksen. Geo. 
Herman. David 
Hickey. E. J. 
Hogstrom. Karl I. 
Holmes, George 
Huber, C. L. 
Johansson, Charles 

-2407 
Jorgenson. Earl 
Jensen, H. T. 
Johnson, C. A. 
Jordan, H. S. 
Kase. A. 
Knofskv. B. W. 
Kristiansen, Wm. A. 
Lafltzen, Hugo 
Larsen, C. J. 



Larsen, Hann 

Larson, C. -1632 
Learch. Paul 
Leskinen. F. 
Matson, Hemming A 
Matson. H. -1808 
Melgant, F. 
Mii-I]aels. R. 
Miller. Victor 
Miller, Harry 
MIkkelsen. Harry 
Murphv. Frannls Leo 
Newkirk, Clifford 
Nordman, Alek 
Nielsen. Jens 
Nlisen, Chas. 
Nelson, Harry 
OellvlB. Wm. A. 
Ohlson, J. A. 
Olson, John 
Olson, Chas. 
Paulsson, Herman 
Petersen. Anton 

-IfiTS 
Petesen, Knut 
Better, G. 
Rensmand. Robert 
Ross, Geo. 
Rutseaard, Roren 
Ruud, Ole H. 
Rytko. Otto 
Samuelsen S 
Schmeltning, Max M. 
Sehroder, August 
Schultz, P. B. 
Sibley, Milton 
Slebert Gust 
Rteen.<Jon. Edward 
Swenaon. C R 
Thoresen, Ingwald 
Tiihkanon Tohan J 
WToia. Fmnk 
Wood, E. E. 



San Pedro Letter List 

Amesen, Frank Leisener, A. 

Anderson, P. A. Linden, M. 

-1695 Llndholm, Chas. 

Anderson. Sven Llndstrom, J. A. 

Andree, E. A. IJunggren, Albin 

BilUngton, T. A. Lonngren, Carl 

Bergh. B. Magnusen, Karl 

Brandes, W. M. Malmberg. Ellis 

Breien. Hans Martin, George 
Corregsona. Vincent Mathis, Hartley 

Davis, Orville Matsen, Hemming 

Deneen, Frank A. Meyer, Claus 

Edmonds, Jack Monterro. John 

Bllingsen, Wm. Nelson, Chas. R. 

Emmerz, A., Nielsen, ,S. 

Evensen, Ed. Ole, Olesen 

Exiesan, Herman Olin, Emil 

Falvig, .John Olsen, Martin 

Fisher, W. -707 Osterhaff, Henry 

Folke, Harry Pedersen, Halver 

Frank, Paul Petersen, Hugo 

Franzell, A. H. Rnnnm. Henry 

Ganser, Joe Rasmus.sen, S. A. 

Grassen, Van Reith, C. 

Gregory, Joe Repson, Ed. 

Gunderson, B. C. Roed, H. 

Gunnerud Torvald Roed, L. A. 

Hansen, Olaf Rosenbl.nd, Billy 

Hansen, Bernard Ross, Wm. 

Hansen, John Samson, Louis 

Hansen, Johan Sanders, Chas. 

Artur Srhmitd. Louis 

Hansen, Chas. L. ShefUl. Oscar 

Heeshe, Henry Sindblom, Ernest W. 

Hill, Fred A. Skogherg. J. 

Holmes, Frank Smehorg. Olaf B. 

Hubner. Carl F. Snarberg, Charles 

Johansen, Carl Sternberg, Alf. 
Johansen, Anton A. Stenroos, A. W. 

Johnson, Matt Stone, Victor 
Johnson, L. T. -4S3Strom. C. L. 

Johannson, N. A. Sturankesken, M. 

.Tohanson, John Suomlnen, Oscar 

Johanfon, Fritz Swanson, Ben 




SHARE /ir^/THE VICTORY 

/save FOR YOVRCOVNTRY ' |wss| SAVE FOR YOVRSELF 

iwi WAR^SAVINGS STAMPS 

If,' I ia--v, \l 



H«%''CU CoHtn. 



CARRY ON! 

Uncle Sam is releasing from his service the men who went "over 
there" to free the world from autocracy. Thousands of soldiers are 
daily receiving their honorable discharges; they pocket their pay, 
bid farewell to their comrades, and sally forth — civilians. 

There is one army, however, which must not be demobilized. 
That is the army of War-Savings Stamp buyers. More recruits are 
needed to carry on the campaign of readjustment which follows 
the signing of the armistice. 

The army of fighters has achieved its purpose. 

The army of savers must remain in "action." 

"Carry on" to a lasting peace under the banner of W. S. S.! 



Johanson, J. A. 
Johnson, J. E. 
Jonasen, J. 
Jones, Erest L. 
Kallio, Frank 
Kind, Herman 
Kolodzieg, George 
Kristoffersen, A. 
Larsen, J. -1542 
Lechemus, Bill 



Thompson, Alex. 

Thompson, Maurice 

Toivonen. F. 

Vizcarra, Oscar 

Wrigg, F. 

V.'^ilhalmson, Karl 
J.Wahi. J. 
B.Yarvinen, V. H. 

Teaman, W. E. 

Zunderer, Heo 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Alfredsen, Adolf Marks, Walter 
Anderson, Harold F.Martenson, Adolp 
Carlstrand Gustaf Martinsson, E. 
Houge. Anton Meyer, Karl 

Kennedy, James ReaNielsen, Alf. W. 
Kennedy, Jas. Rea Nelson, C. W. 

(Package) Olsen, Robert 

Lapauble, Jean Reilley, Ralph 

Pierre Leyfried, M. -2962 

Magail, Michael 



You Want the Truth 

This year there will be stlrrlngr times 
In the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship It Is Increasingly dltflcult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

will be specially represented at Wash- 
ington and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La FoUette Is making a 
real fight to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from the common people and place 
them where they belong — on excess 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and Incomes. Because of this he Is be- 
ing attacked more bitterly than aay 
other m^n in puhllc Hf» 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year— Agents Wanted 

La Follette'a Magazine, Madison, Wit. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

I am representing the Union men 
who are entitled to salvage and 
members of the crew of the fol- 
lowing vessels. In most cases ac- 
tion has commenced. In some cases 
I he funds have been recovered. In 
others they are readily recoverable 
upon filing power of attorney form 
with me. Address this office by letter. 
"Princeton" vs. "Ardmore,"' $7500 re- 
ceived. "Gulf of Mexico" vs. Bark 
"Portugal," $5000. "Gulf Coast" vs. 
"Boxleaf," settled. "Argonaut" vs. 
"Jason," funds received. "Iroquois" 
vs. "Skinner," settled, crews share 
$12,250. "Erases" vs. "Iroquois," set- 
tled. "Maine" vs. "Theresa Ac- 
comme.'" "Oskawa" vs. "Westgrove." 
"Buda 2" vs. "Western Star." "St. 
Charles" vs. "Monte Cenis." "Flor- 
ence Olsen" vs. "Marina." Flor- 
ence Olsen" vs. "Claremont." "Alli- 
ance" vs. "Belvcrnon." "Donnelly" 
vs. "Irish." "Anacortes" vs. "S. O. 
Barge No. 95." "Fred W. Wellor" 
vs. "Overbrook." "Neptunas" vs. 
"Panama." "Quincy" vs. "Transpor- 
tation." "Herman Frash" vs. "Bril- 
liant." "O'Neil" vs. "Oregon." Bark 
"Superior." "Pan American" vs 
"Santa Rita." "St. Charles" vs 
"Tea." Tug "Navigator" vs. "Edgar 
IT. Vance." "Tunica" vs. "Neppon- 
ier." "Lake Charles" vs. "Cantiwo." 
Silas B. Axtell, 1 Broadway. New 
York City. 8-20-18 



Home Newt 



In the last twelve months Canada 
bought approximately $700,000,000 
worth of goods from the United 
States and sold approximately $400,- 
000,000 worth in the American mar- 
ket. 

The Government's report on im- 
migration into the United States 
shows that 141,132 arrived during 
the twelve months ended with last 
June as compared with 110,618 of 
the fiscal year 1918. 

Anthony Caminetti, Commissioner 
General of Immigration, recently 
issued a statement, showing that 
102,513 foreigners have left the 
United States since the armistice 
and a total of 123,522 during the 
twelve months ending June 30, 1919. 
I'or the five years ended June 30, 
1919, 618,223 emigrants departed, as 
compared with 1,172,679 arrivals for 
the same period, an excess of arriv- 
als over departures of 554.456. 

The State of Kansas has oper- 
ated its own printing plant since 
July 1, 1905. The Legislature of 1913 
ai>propriated $150,000 to purchase 
additional ground, and enlarge the 
plant. The State now has a modern 
book-making plant valued at approxi- 
mately $235,000, with a floor space 
of 53,460 square feet. The Kansas 
State printing plant is saving $90,000 
each year on the State's printing 
alone. The school patrons saved 
$74,781.61 on textbooks, which they 
buy at cost of production. 

Demanding even-handed justice 
for the negro in the United States 
the National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People has 
issued a statement that the only 
four regiments of the American 
I'^xpeditionary Forces to be cited 
for bravery and to receive the 
French Croix de Guerre were col- 
ored—the 369th, the 370th, 371st and 
372nd. The statement is made on 
the authority of J. Howard Durkee, 
president of Howard University, and 
is corroborated by Emmett J. Scott, 
former special assistant to the Sec- 
retary of War. 

That the United States Govern- 
ment is determined to safeguard its 
interests on the Mexican border is 
evidenced by the construction of a 
military wire fence along the bounda- 
ries between Mexicali and Calexico, 
California, work on which started 
July 1. The fence now in the course 
of construction will cover an area of 
two miles in length. It will be of 
eight-strand barbed wire with con- 
crete posts about six inches square 
every 10 feet and eight feet high. 
The work is being done by civilians 
under the supervision of the War 
Department, through whom the ap- 
propriation for the construction work 
was secured. 

The House Immigration Committee 
has reported a bill to stop all immi- 
gration into this country for two 
years, with only minor exceptions, 
and to deport all aliens who with- 
drew first papers in order not to 
undergo military service. When the 
two-year period has expired, if the 
bill is enacted, only those aliens who 
submit written declarations of their 
intention to become American citi- 
zens will be admitted unless they 
have passports. Once here, aliens 
would be required to register each 
year until they became citizens, and 
fraudulent entry would be punishable 
by five years in jail and a fine of 
$1000. After serving sentence, the 
alien would be deported. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Domestic and Naval 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 



526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

. HI MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

bix hits out of a possible eight pARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

on a small floating target is the hAIGHT STREET BRANCH. Haight and Belvedere Streets 

record of a rilipino gun crew aboard 

the American destroyer "Rizal." 
Owing to tlie increased cost of 

coal and other necessities, the lines 

composing the North Atlantic Pas- 
senger Conference have made eflfect- 

ive increases of $15 for first-class 

accommodations, $10 for second 

class, and $5 for third class passage. 

This action is in addition to the 10 

per cent, increase recently noted. 
Two new services are to be estab- 



JUNE 30, 1919. 

Assets $60,509,192.14 

JDeposits 57,122,180.22 

'.apiial Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,387,011.92 

Employees" Pension Fund 306,852.44 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

QKO. 'lOURNY, Vice-Pres. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vlce-Pres. and Ca«hl«r 

E. T. KKUSE, Vice-President 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary 

WM. D. NBWHUUSE, Assistant Secretary 

GOODFELLOVV, EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, 

General Attorneys 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

E. N. VAN BERGEN 



,•1,1 ,1 , , T I I c- 1- , GEO. TOURNY I. N. WALTER 

lished shortly by the Lloyd Sabaudo, e t kruse hU(}H goodfellow Robert dollar 

one of which will cater for Northern I ^- A. CHRistenson L. s. sherman 



European trade and the other for rj c* • I I * i. 

the Australian. The company is ban T ranClSCO LcttCr LlSt 

closely allied with Messrs. Furness, I Letters at tlie San Francisco Sailors* 

Withy & Co., Ltd., and are being Union Oirice are advertised for tliree 

. , . ^. . ^ . , ^1 months only and will be relumed to tlie 

supported in their enterprise by the p^^^ ofn^-e ^t the expiration of four 

Italian Government. The two serv- months from tlie date of delivery. 

ices will be bi-monthly, the vessels | Members whose man Is advertised In 

engaged in the trade being about these columns should at once notify 

8,000 tons, with a speed of about U f ^- .^'^'',^'- ^""i'r'^i=,t'''!!ff.Tt' V-!n 
' Seamen s Journal, 59 Clay Street, San 

knots when fully loaded. The boats Francisco, Cal., to forward same to the 
will start from Genoa and run to ! port of their destiaitlon. 
Antwerp, where they will take up'Aguilar Alf. Andersson, A. O. 

cargo destined for Australia. I^iir'n''"'"' Andlrlon?' John A 

The U. S. Shipping Board has ' Alto W Karl _^^^^ a'eMs°o"n, 'S' V" 

decided to take prompt steps for the Andersen,' F. -1473 Andersson, C. -2185 
. ii' 1 1 r • ; Andprsen N -197iAntonsen, A. I. 

establishment of passenger service ^;;;j^,^|^'^; a -2031 Ann. A^ton 
between the United States and South Anderson,' James Aristudas, C. 
A.,., • Ti c . 1 .. 1 Anderson, Niels F. Armstrong, Bill 

America. The first vessel to be Andersson. C. -2001 Ask. E. A. 
put in the passenger service will be Andersson,' Gottried Aueusllne. Anth. 
, ,,,, . „ , , , ^ Andersson, Ingmar Auker, v\ . S. 

the Moccasin, formerly the Ger- Andreson, Jorgen Austed, Barney 
man steamer "Prinz Joachim," a 13 Andreasen, O. -1344 



knot boat of 4,760 tons gross, built Ralco, Juan 

in 1903 for the New York- West India UaiioW.^R. 

trade. She is now being refitted ]^^Z: ^-my 

and it is expected to have her run- Baptiste, D. 

ning next December. She is an oil u^;"^^": "'"^!a86 

burner. As soon as the former Ger- dentin, Paul 

. . , ,1 Bfiiluso Muni, 

man boats now in the hands of the Bergman, Gust 

U. S. Navy become available, the g-f^\^°i;; ^fi|^ 



establish and develop Ujorka, Hans K. 
,,..■ , ,. , "^ , Bjorklund, G. 

additional passenger lines between Bleasing, W. 



board will 

additional i 

the United States and the Orient. | ^'"'"S""' ^- ^• 

The Maine Sea and Shore Fisheries Capallo, Joseph 
,-~ . . , , , 1 . , , Carlsen, Julius 

Commission has lately received from Carlson, Joe 

the Government a patrol boat known ^a,'^|'|°n' Andrew 
as the "ICnterprise," capable of 20- Carlson! E. R. 

Carroll, James 



knot speed. 
Newport, R 



Boll, Hans 
Borjesen, H. 
Borjeseii, L. 
Bornhofen, P. P. 
Bos.shard, Henry 
Bowuiian, Billie 
Boyes, A. 
Brain, Louis 
Brander, William 
Brandt, B. 
Bratl, A. V. 
Browne, Chas. B. 
Bruuin, E. -2583 
Bryant, J. S. 
Bugel, J. 
Byars. Terry 
Bye. K. 

Clausen, Louis 
Cockrane, R. 
Colman, John 
Conigan, R. B. 
Conrad, P. W. 
Cordey, Allan 
Correro. T. R. 



It was brought from christensen, K. D. Cox. R. H. 



Didriksen. Martin 
Diehl, Geo. A. 
Drisuoll, John 
Douglas, W. F. 
rebrt Drysdale, H. 

Dumas, Clifford 



coast by the commission. 



I., by Chairman H. D. ' "1042 Craig Tho 

_ . „ ,, x.^ ,,, Chiisiensen, H. C. Crawford, T. A. 

Crie, Capt. H. H. Webber, Chief christensen. R. H. Crowley, Fred 

Engineer Thomas McKinney and Chrlstenson, Einar 

Stephen Littlefield, the steward, and t)ahler. H. N. 
^ ■., . 1 • -T-, Damberg, A. A. 

IS now at Morse s yard in Thomaston Daskeland, N. N. 

for a few repairs. The "Enterprise" |ii^^^^^„^^'^e'^" 

measures 66 feet over all, has two Deiahanty, J. J. 
o 1- J c. 1- , ,_. , De Vroom, C. J. 

6-cylinder Sterling engines of 175 h.' 

p. each, and is a substantial sea- ]^d^'i'r!'"FHt^'''"' 
worthy craft, with excellent acconi- Edward, Ole 
„ , .. rni t . • . , ■ Fillers, Heinle 

modations. The boat is to be used i.;ide J -962 
exclusively by the Sea and Shore g™' j|i„^, 
I'isheries Commission, on work which Elliot, Pletro 

cannot be handled by the 10 smaller Fallon, W. 

Felsch! C. 
Fernstrom, F. 
j Fitshenry, Gordon 

The normal supply of coal on Fo'rsfun^'^Fred 
hand at the Panama Canal during Foss, L. 
.1 .. I . T -,n ,,^,^ Francke, Reynolds 

the quarter ended June 30, 1919, 1 

taking the average for three months, Ga"ck,^Willy 

was 206,622 tons. The amount con- Gerba'ulet, J. W^ 

, ,, . . Gibson, Geo. A. 

sumed per month, averaging the Gibson, William 

three months, was 47.594 tons. Coal Gir^*Pedro' ^' 
on hand on July 1, 1919, amounted Graham, W. F. 
to 183,964 tons. The main coaling Haak, R. 
plant at Cristobal has discharging ca- , [J^«|f^y'«\',^C^^, 
pacity of 1,000 tons per hour, reclaim- Hakala, Paul 
ing capacity of 2,000 tons per hour, |^vS,olErIing 
and delivering or reloading capacity Hammerquist, a. 
c T-nn • 1 . ~, . iHannelius, R. F. 

ot dMV tons per hour.. The main | Hansohman, W. 

coaling plant at Balboa has dis- ^^^J^^JJ; f^ Jy 

charging capacity of 500 tons per Hansen', Scott 

_„_i • ■ •. r f ' Hansen, Hans P. 

reclaiming capacity of four Hansen R. C 



Ellis, Frank L. 
Einard, J. 
Engblom, John R. 
Erickson, Gust W. 
Erickson. John 
Ernst, E. 
Esterberg, G. 
Evensen, Martin 

Frazler, H. B. 
Freitag, W. F. 
Fredriksen, Herman 
Frizzell, R. L. 
Frizzellc, Jack 
Froline, R. 
Fuller, Geo. 



Gronroos, Iver 
Gronroos, John 
GuUaksen, Hans 
Gundersen, Andreas 
Gustafsson, Valter 
Gulmann, Paul C. 
M. -1123 



hour; 



beam cranes, 500 tons per hour: Heijarl, Aug. 
reclaiming capacity of two unloaders. | Helden, Harry 
500 tons per hour, and delivering | ^;!;',,''J;'g'^lpf 
or reloading capacity, 1,000 tons per 
hour. 



Henrlksson, W. 
Henzengo, Cornelin 
Hermansson, Frits 
Herrmann, Math. 
Hewell. 
Heyen, Thor 
Higgins, P. 
yi»> Albert 
Hobbs, F. A. 
Hoglander, Martin 
Holmbcrg, Ch.as. 
Holmgren. G. J. 
Holland. D. 
A. Hollingsworth, W. C. 
Horner, A. 
Hreljan, Giuseppo 
Hiiirn. O. -1934 
Huhertz, Emil 
Hunter, Earnest 



Henrikson, J. L. M.Hvid, Hans 
Ingebretsen, Alf. Iversen, Iver 



Jacimto, Manuel 
.Jav. uosun, jacLfO 
Jaderholm, Hans 
Janson, C. J. W. 
JanR!*on. ''" H. 
.Jensen, Olaf 
Jtnsen, LorentB 
Jensen, J. P. 
Jensen, S. P. 
.H-ll^trn, E. A. 
Jessen, Carl 
Johansen, Ola 
Johansen, Walter 

Kallberg, Arwid 
Kalning, H. 
ii-.uiiu. V'eua 
Kailgien, Gust 
Kasik, Aug. 
Keeney, F. W. 
Keith, John R. 
Kirby, G. D. 
iMiiciseii, l^rl 
Kjeld, K. 
Kjell, Karl 
Klug, Fred 
Knitzer, A. 

l.agerberg. Chas. 
Ijiihke, Nick 
Lamberg, H. 
Lambert, E. J. 
i^aiiiuBig, Herman 
Lambert, S. I. _ . 

LanUburg, Herman Liihikiuss, I). H. 
l-aiigworthy. E. C. Lindquist, Harry 
Larson, Albin Loaretei, Jacob 

Larsen, Eekild l.i.ii;r.-ii K. 

Larsen, Kornelius Lohne, E. 
LiUisen, Flngl. Lonnqvist, Jolin 

Larsen, Kaare Lundquist, Axel 

MacGregor, Donald Mettson, Carl 
Madsen, Ludvig Mikkelsen. Olaf 



Johnsen, A. B. 
Joiinsen, Albert 
Joiianseu, A. -218* 
Johnsen, Waltlier 
Johnson, C. -2094 
Johnson, C. O. 
Johnson, John 
Jonson, Karl 
Jorgensen, Johann«s 
Joigeiisen, Ole E. 
Joruens'n. .Inreen 
Ju»ll, Ragnwald 

Knox, David 
Knud.sen. Uangvald 
Kolustow, A. 
I- .-II ,-• 
Komo, Martin 
Koppen, Bernt 
Koster, E. 
Knudsen, Martin 
Kristiansen, Henry 
Kiiiiiii. iitrry 
Kuckens, Bernard 
Kulluoin, Oscar 



Larsen, J. H. -2280 
l,Mio.-ti. K -1660 
Larson, Henry 
Lehmann, Richard 
Lieseii, V\ ni. 
Ligoski, Joe 



Mnlmin, T. 
.viaisiiall, 1. S. 
.Martins, Jose 
viathls. H. 
Mathisen, A. 
Maxin, A. 
M«Callum, Chas. 
.viciuanus, P. 
\lpek. O. J. 
Merkley, M. M. 
Aagel, A. 
v iirlp. Chris. 
Nelson, J. 
Nelson, C. J. 
Nelson, Fred 
Nelson, Waldemar 



Miller, W'erner 
Miilemeyer, 1. F. 
Mr.p K. 
Moller, H. W. 
Monson, M. O. 
Moore, Thos. 
Morrison. Phillip 
Mosmanss, C. C. 
Myers, Gaylard E. 

Nielsen, C. -1303 
Nielsen, P. L. 
Xilson, Edon 
Niissuii, ». H. H. 
Noonan, J. 
Nordenberg. Alfred 



.Nelson, John, -1013 Nordstrom. Bror 



ss, Ak.se 1 
Nielsen, Steffen 
Nilsen, Harry 
-Meisen, V illy 
.Vielsen. Carl C. 
Ode, John 

.a. sou, O. B. 

OI«en, Andres 
Olsen, P. J. -1005 
Olsen, J. -324 
olsen, Mariiius 
Olsen, Oskar 
I'arson. Herman 
Pedersen, Eugene 
Pedersen, Eysten 

iiei"irv. Tom 

Perks, Fred 
. el sson, o. W. 
Perselli. Geo. 
Peters, Edw. 



Norgard, Sigurd 
Nuiies. C. C. 
Nyland. A. M. J. 
Nystrom, Arthur 

Olson, Albert 
Olsson, James 
Ord, W. v/d 
Ormond, David 
Osterholm, J. W. 
Oslh, T. 

Pettersen, Franr 
Peterson, Jennings 
Peterson, M. 
PPtt^rHen. Uigbert 
Pfantsh, C. 
Pithcaithly, H. W. 
P.iiler. K. 
Post, Albert 



Peters, J. M. 
Petersen, H. A. 
Peterson, Viktor 

Raaum, Johannes 
Ramstad, A. 
Ranta, Hj. 
Rasmussea, Jacob 
Rasmussen, E. V. 
Rasmussen, Emil 
Rehnstrom, Axel 
Reiersgaard, H. 
Rian, H. 

.'Saalma. .Toseoh 
Sahlin, Nils 
Sandell, F. S. 
Sandquist, E. G. 
Siiiiiliilom, K. 
Santo, C. 
Sawdon, J. W. V. 
Scliaab, Anton 
Schlieman, -2878 
.^ililai-lite, Alf. 
Scholtes, Berhard 
Shannon, J. 
Sjogren. E. -2960 
Skold. C. 
Sonnenberg, J. C. 
Sowick, B. 

Taft, Hans 
'lellefsen, Emil 

I'ergersen, Tom 
Terry, J. E. 

I honias. Frank 

Thompson. C. 
Thorsen, Karl 

Van Fleet, F. B. Vander, Klift J. J. 
Van Keen, T. R. A. Victor, J. 

Wally, M. Wiljanen Otto 

Wamser, A. P. Wilks, J. 

Watkin, E. H. Wilkinson, Geo. 

Weelen, Theodorus Winter, Gothard 
Wohtie. W^ H. 
W'heller, Geo. 
Wikstrom, W. 

Zlehr, C. 



Postel, Herbert 
Preen, P. A. van 

Richardson, J. W. 
Richardson, E. A. 
Riddell, Allan 
Rivera, John 
Roach, ». E. 
Ronning, H. 
Rosa, John 
Ross, Geo. 
Rosen, V. 

Smedsvig, O. B. 
Smith, T. J. 
Sparling, James 
Stenssloff, R. 
fjterberg, Alf. 
Stimpson, V. B. 
Stolzerman, E. 
Strand, A. E. 
St rand berg, Elof 
Ptrntton. Harrv 
Sundwall. W. E. 
Suominen, Frans 
Suominen, O. -1755 
Swanson, J. S. -2907 
Swanson, Oscar 

Thorstensen, Thorn 
Timmers, H. P. 
TofTrl. A 
Trygg, Gust 
Tyler, Frank 
Tyskman, H. 



Woods. E. J. -714 
Wollman, Emil 

Zunk, Bruno 



PACKAGES. 



Benson. Fred 
Rgan, John 
Flood. Alex. 
Goodmans. O. 
Oiinderson. Ole 
Highland. D. 
Irmey, Fred 
Teweft. Chns. 
Johansen, S. R. 



Johaneson, K. 
I/ong. C. 

MacDonnell. W. A. 
Mavea. J. B 
Monroe. A. J. 
OUen. H. 
Olsen, Ole 
Olaon, Knut 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Coamo" who were on board when 
she salved the S. S. "Corona" on or 
about March 25th, 1919, and towed 
her to Porto Rico, will kindly call 
or communicate with the undersigned 
as soon as possible. S. B. Axtell, 
No. 1 Broadway, New York. 

10-1-19 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of John Earnest Oberg, a member 
of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
last heard of in Seattle, Wash., April 
10, 1918, kindly notify his brother, 
Emil Oberg, 1160A York Street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 10-1-19 



L. H. Lindross, formerly on 
schooner "Coinmcrce," is requested 
to call at the office of the U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 9-10-19 

phone Kearny 5361 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 

Opposite Southern Pacific BldQ. 

60 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Walt, by the Latest Machinery 

Work Called For and Delivered 
WE USE ONLY THF BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 



CHRIST NSEN'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Established 1906 

CAPT. C. EHLERS, Superint«ndent 
257 Hansford Bldg 
268 Market Street 

The pupils of this well known school 
are taught all up-to-date requirements 
for passing a successful examination 
before the United States Steamboat 
Inspection Service. 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



Phone Kearny 5132 

East Street Tailors 

GENERAL OUTFITTER 

Altering done at moderate prices 

209 East Street, nr. Washington 

San Francisco 

H. LEVERIDGE 



Phon« Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms. 35 to 50 cents per day. 
or 12 to $3.00 per week, with all mod- 
ern conveniences. Free Hot and Cold 
Shower Baths on every floor. Elevator 
Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 

HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
TH08. 8. CHRISTENSEN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 775« 

Res., Randolph 27 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays S a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco. Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING. FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most ReasonabU 

Prices •• ■: Union Made Goods Only 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phone Douglas 1415 San Francisco 



LOOK 

For the Name and the Number 

GEO. A. PRICE 

19 East Street, San Francisco 

U S. Navy Tower's 

Sea Boots Flannels Oil Skint 

SEAMEN— OUTFITTER— FISHERMEN 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Kearny 3888 

JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent^s Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 
Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Missior 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room 

— at — 

212 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Reliable Tailor 

Up-to-date Cloths at Popular 
Prices. All work guaranteed. 

TOM WILLIAMS 

28 SACRAMENTO STREET 

Near Market 

Special Inducements to Seafaring Trade 

SUITS STEAM PRESSED, 50 Cts. 

The only way; no burning of 
Karments. 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 



NAUTICAL BOOKS AND INSTRUMENTS 

MACARTHUR'S NAVIGATION LAWS 

CUGLE'S NAVIGATION BOOKS 



UNIFORMS and SUITS 

MADE TO ORDER, also READY TO WEAR 

CAPS, HATS, SHOES, ETC. 

OILSKINS, RUBBER BOOTS, BEDDING and BLANKETS 

SLOP-CHESTS AT WHOLESALE 



36-40 STEUART STREET 

D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 



Newt from Abroad 



\ 



KELLEHER & BROWNE 

THE IRISH TAILORS 



716 MARKET STREET 



at Third and Kearny 



UNION MADE 
IN OUR OWN SHOP 

Represented by 

E. PEGUILLAN 




SUITS AND 
OVERCOATS 

to Order at Popular 
Prices 




ARE YOUR LIBERTY BONDS SAFE 

Bring or send them for safekeeping to this Savings 
and Commercial Bank and open a 

LIBERTY BONDS SAVINGS ACCOUNT 
We will take care of your Liberty Bonds for you 
free of charge. Our folder 

"What Shall I Do With Them" '^S£'s^'i::T^J^ ^. 

Anglo-California Trust Company Bank 

"THE PERSONAL SERVICE BANK" 
Market and Sansome Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

Sixteentii and Mission Streets Third and Twentieth Streets 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO SEAFARING MEN 



UTTMARK'S NAUTICAL ACADEMY 

(Established 1882) 
CAPTAIN F. E. UTTMARK, Principal 



8 State Street 
New York, N. Y. 



30 India Street, 
Boston, iVIass. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR MASTERS', MATES' AND 
PILOTS' EXAMINATION 

Our ACADEIVIY is recognized as the oldest and best equipped NAVIGATION 

SCHOOL in the United States and is up to date in every respect. For 

full information call at school or write. Catalog sent free on request. 

"UTTMARK'S FOR NAVIGATION" 




liriijii 




JACOB PETERSEN ft SON 
Proprietor* 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Cof¥ee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
.SAN T?T?ANCTtrO 



The British Government has de- 
cided to release at once a great 
quantity of package mail held up in 
England during the war. 

Japanese newspapers report that 
recently in a Japanese barracks near 
Tokyo, forty reservist soldiers flogged 
their corporal as a reproof for his 
harsh treatment of them. 

The headquarters of the American 
army of occupation has rescinded 
the order preventing American sol- 
diers from fraternizing with German 
civilians. 

Martin Lopez, second in command 
in the rebel army of Francisco Villa, 
died of wounds received when Amer- 
icans drove the Villistas from Juarez 
recently, according to a Mexican 
government statement. 

The Rumanian Government is con- 
sidering the nationalization of all 
petroleum companies, according to a 
Geneva dispatch to the Petit Parisian, 
which says the step inay be taken 
"in order to avoid pressure from 
American financiers, who are seek- 
ing a monopoly in petroleum there." 
In an encounter at Saarbrucken be- 
tween bourgeois and French soldiers 
many persons on both sides were 
wounded, according to a dispatch to 
the "Lokal Anzeiger." One hundred 
Frenchmen participated in the con- 
flict. Numerous Germans have been 
arrested for having attacked the 
Frenchmen. 

Mexican diplomatic officials in Lon- 
don are watching the development of 
a scheme of Brigadier - General 
Critchley, late of the Canadian army, 
to settle a large number of demobil- 
ized British officers on a large ranch 
in Mexico, which is said to be under 
the patronage of the Carranza Gov- 
ernment. 

The Argentine minister in Vienna 
has advised the foreign ministry that 
a commission of foreign bankers in 
Vienna is seeking lands in Argentina 
suitable for colonization by Austrian 
families. Honorio Pueyrredon, for- 
eign minister, has replied that the fis- 
cal lands in the northern and south- 
ern section of Argentina are suitable 
for such colonization. 

According to the Kreuz Zeitung, 
Dr. Hertz, former Prussian Minister 
of Finance, addressing a Nationalist 
meeting at Breslau, declared that the 
monarchy would be revived by con- 
stitutional means. "A two-thirds ma- 
jority in Parliament is sufficient and 
when the entire nation demands it, 
we shall have a Hohenzollern mon- 
archy," Hertz is quoted as having 
said. 

The Supreme Council of the Peace 
Conference approved the report of 
the commission on Spitzbergen grant- 
ing to Norway political suzerainty 
over the Spitzbergen archipelago. 
Norway is closer to Spitzbergen than 
any other country and virtually all 
of the several nations which had put 
in claims to the territory had waived 
them before the commission's report 
was presented. The territory is 
chiefly valuable for its coal mines, 
owned by Norwegians. 

The only way Germany can hope 
to recover her economic position is 
through a large loan arranged by an 
international conference and sup- 
ported by the United States, the 
Tageblatt reports Mathias Erzberger, 
the minister of finance, as declaring 
in the national assembly during a 
discussion of taxation revision. The 
independent Socialists, it is added, 
strongly supported the proposition. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the WiU 



Traveler — Dili you find a roll con- 
taining fifty dollars under my pillow? 
Pullman Porter — Yas, suh; thank 
vou, suh. — Cartoons Magazine. 



Wife (with newspaper) — Another 
strike. Isn't it awful? Hub— Can't 
say until you give me particulars — 
it might be a strike of tax collectors. 
— Cleveland Press. 



Repartee. — "We need brains in this 
business, sir." 

"I know you do. The business 
shows it." — Baltimore American. 



Reilly— You'll be sorry to hear 
that Pat Donovan was drowned yes- 
terday. Dooley — But I thought he 
was a good swimmer? Reilly — Yes, 
but he was a staunch union man. 
He swam for eight hours then gave 
it up — on principle. — New York 
Globe. 



The young lady had purchased a 
book in a department store and ten- 
dered a ten-dollar note for it. Then 
she began to read. Finally the 
change came, but the girl demurred. 
■'I want another book," she said. 
"But you asked for that one," in- 
sisted the clerk. "I know it," she 
answered sweetly, "but I've read it 
while I was waiting for my change." 



Being very conceited about his fine 
figure, the sportsman wore corsets 
to show it off. One day he was 
thrown from his horse and lay prone 
on the ground. A farm laborer ran 
to render his assistance. The first- 
aid man began to feel the fallen 
one all over to see if any bones 
were broken, when suddenly he 
yelled out to another laborer: "Run 
Jack, for heaven's sake, for a doctor! 
Here's a man's ribs running north 
and south instead of east and west." 



A group of housewives were hav- 
ing tea together at a restaurant and 
talking over the events of the 
day. The question under discussion 
was as to who had done most to 
win the war. Some said Haig, others 
Beatty, others Foch. At last one 
woman chipped in: "I don't know 
who's done most to win the war," 
she said, "but I know who's been 
most talked about." "Who's that?" 
came a chorus. "Why, this 'ere 
Alice Lorraine that the French and 
Germans came to blows over." 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 



1122-1124 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Children's Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them tor example 
that you believe in a savings account. 

They cannot start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

7U MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
•AN FRANCISCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1S88 

Consular Building^, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to Illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and la now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education requirt-d of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




HORACE R. TAYLOR 



HENRY TAYLOR 



TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

510 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

IMPORTERS OF NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 
LORD KELVIN'S and WHYTE THOMSON'S 
Compasses, Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sound- 
ing Machines, Sextants, Parallel Rulers, Pelorus Di- 
viders and Nautical Books of Every description. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 
1866 — over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 



J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET Opposite Ferry Post Office 

Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When Yau Buy 
from Ua, Liberty 
Bonds ara Ao- 
cepted for Cash. 



Diamonds 
Watches 



Phona Doualas t7U 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Slae 




SOLID GOLD t1.50 
OOLO FILLED .50 



64 MARKET STREET 



High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

SEAMEN-- When in Port- BE SURE 

You see the most complete Hne of 

UNION LABEL SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS IN THE U. S. A. 

Sold Direct to You at Manufacturer's Prices 



EAGLESON 8 CO, 



1118 Market St. 
San Francisco 
717 K St., near Postoffice 

Sacramento 
112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 



Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Silverware 




715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



QamesJi. 3orenseit 



Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

Big Stock — Everything Marked in Plain Figures 

THF. OXE-PRICK TF-WELRY STORE 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 

At the Big Red Clock and the Chimes. 




Market ai FUth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hat*, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend, San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN! 
You Know Ma 




I am 

"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats too. 

If you want your Panama blocked 

right, I'll do that. 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 



KD SEAL CKAI CO^ MANUrAaUKCBS 

133 FIRST STREET, 8. F. 
Phone Douglas 1M0 



CJBfiBosr'En 

OVERALLS 8.PAKT5 

UNION MADE ^ 

ARGONAUT sn 



I 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Ofi&cial Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization 



VOL. XXXIII, No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1919. 



Whole No. 2560. 



THE STEEL STRIKE 

A Strike for Freedom from the Fetters of Industrial Autocracy 



Nothing is ever settled till it's settled 
right. Whatever may be the outcome of 
the present steel strike, no lasting peace 
in that industry will be possible until the 
issues over which the strike is being 
fought have been decided in favor of the 
workers. This is the general tenor of an 
article by Mr. John A. Fitch, herewith re- 
printed from a recent issue of "The Sur- 
vey." As Mr. Fitch truly says, "in the 
steel industrj' for more tiian twenty 
years men have not been free." Their 
battle now is for freedom. Garyism must 
go. 



When, a few weeks ago, Judge Gary, chair- 
man of the board of directors of the United 
States Steel Corporation refused to confer with 
a committee of men representing unions of steel 
workers employed in corporation mills, he was 
acting in accordance with the traditions of his 
company and the practice of its officials. For 
years Judge Gary has received news of the 
feelings of his employes through the presidents 
of the subsidiary companies. For years these 
presidents have refused a hearing to men who 
desired to present their views collectively and 
have discharged those who joined labor organi- 
zations. Once when Judge Gary wanted to 
thank the employes of the Carnegie Steel Com- 
pany for their loyalty to the corporation the 
nearest representative of the workers to whom 
he felt he could address himself was the chair- 
man of the board of directors of the Carnegie 
Company. 

It was in a new sort of world, however, that 
Judge Gary the other day tried to summon the 
old formulae. Kings and autocrats have fallen 
since the last wholesale discharge of Steel 
Corporation employees who tried to organize. 
Labor organizations as much as any group made 
it possible to win the war. The Government 
itself had laid down the dictum that men should 
he free to organize and to bargain collectively. 
Under that new concepton of rights thousands 
of steel workers had joined the organizations of 
their trades. 

The strike that began last Monday was called 
to try the issue of whether the old era or the 
new is to prevail. The question on which a 
verdict must be rendered is whether conditions 
which industry as a whole has left behind, con- 
ditions that were typical of fifty years ago but 
which are now utterly rejected by the moral 
sense of the times, are to continue in the great 
basic industry of steel. 

When the whole trend of the times is toward 
an eight-hour day or less, are the steel workers 
of the country to work twelve hours every day, 
thousands of them seven days a week with a 
long shift of twenty-four hours' continuous duty 
every second week? With the right of collective 
bargaining now accepted as a fundamental right. 



are the steel workers to continue a"y longer 
to be subject to a regime of absolute dictator- 
ship, with no opportunity to express themselves 
as to tile conditions under which they are to 
work, with discharge the penalty if they join a 
union? Regardless of whatever other incidental 
questions may be injected into the situation, 
these two are the primary issues over which the 
strike will be fought; and there will never be 
hope of lasting peace in the steel industry until 
they are settled in accordance with twentieth 
century convictions. 

The twelve-hour day has always existed in 
the steel mills to a greater or less extent. It 
became universal outside of the sheet and tin 
mills after the power of the union was broken 
in the Homestead strike of 1892. The seven- 
day week was long regarded as inevitable in 
the essentially continuous processes, like blast 
furnaces, and until 1912 was universal in those 
departments. 

Tile twelve-hour day and the seven-day week 
are under universal condemnation. Not even the 
steel mill officials defend them. In addition to 
that, they have been officially condemned by the 
stockholders of the United States Steel Cor- 
poration. In 1911, stung by the criticisms of 
their employment policies made by the Pitts- 
burgh Survey, the stockholders of the corpora- 
tion at their annual meeting directed Judge 
Gar.v to appoint a committee to investigate and 
report on employment conditions in the indus- 
try. The committee consisted of Stuyvesant 
Fish, chairman, Thomas De Witt Cuyler, Darius 
Miller, then president of the Burlington Rail- 
road, Charles L. Taylor of the Carnegie Steel 
Company and Charles A. Painter, a Pittsburgh 
stockbroker. In their report, which was pre- 
sented at the annual meeting in 1912, the com- 
mittee stAted that SO or 60 per cent of the 
employes in rolling mills, open hearth and blast 
furnaces were working the twelve-hour day. In 
commenting on this fact they said: 

"We are of the opinion that a twelve-hour 
day of labor, followed continuously by any 
group of men for any considerable number of 
years, means a decreasing of the efficiency and 
lessening of the vigor and virility of such men, 
. . . VVhen it is remembered that the twelve- 
hour day to the man in the mills means ap- 
proximately thirteen hours away from his home 
and family — not for one day but for all work- 
ing days — it leaves but scant time for self im- 
provement, for companionship with his family, 
for recreation and leisure. . . . We do believe 
that . . . there will eventually come a shorten- 
ing of the hours of labor and the eventual 
abolishment of the twelve-hour day which will 
tend toward increasing the efficiency and re- 
sourcefulness of the working population and 
for that reason bring benefit to both employer 
and employed." 

The committee recommended to the officers 
of the corporation that "steps be taken now" 
in the direction of "reducing the long hours of 
labor." That was in 1912. In 1913, tlie Finance 
Committee rei)orted' to the stockholders that 
nothing could be done unless the competitors 
of the Steel Corporation also adopted a shorter 



work day. Nothing was done therefore toward 
mitigating this evil by the Steel Corporation or 
Its principal competitors until September, just a 
year ago, when the Steel Corporation announced 
the adoption of the "basic" eight-hour day. This 
move, which was followed largely by the inde- 
pendents, did not mean a shortening of the 
working day. It meant the payment of overtime 
after eght hours and amounted to a 10 per cent, 
increase in wages, with the men working twelve 
hours as before. The Colorado Fuel & Iron 
Company, with a plant at Pueblo, Colo., is the 
only steel company that is known to have 
adopted the actual eight-hour day with three 
shifts of workers in the twenty-four hours. 

The stockholders' committee of 1912 also re- 
ported on the seven-day week. They found it 
general in departments where continuous opera- 
tion was essential and to a certain extent in 
other departments. On this subject the com- 
mittee said, "Whether viewed from a physical, 
social, or moral point of view we believe the 
seven-day week is detrimental to those en- 
gaged in it. . . . We are strongly of the 
opinion that no matter what alleged difficulties 
in operation may seem to hinder the abandon- 
ment of the seven-day week, they must be met." 
This was followed l>y the appointment of a com- 
mittee by the American Iron and Steel Institute 
to work out a plan for providing one day 
of rest in seven for every worker. Such a plan 
was adopted by the United States Steel Cor- 
poration and some of the independent com- 
panies, and by 1914 seven-day labor had been 
greatly reduced in tiie corporation mills and 
many others. 

Then came the war. with its excessive demand 
on the steel industry. The six-day week went 
by the board nearly everywhere. The Lacka- 
wanna Steel Company at Buffalo was prevented 
by the New York law from requiring its inen to 
work seven days a week, but elsewliere seven- 
day labor became general. In Pittsi)urgh even 
the rolling mills, for a time at least, were oper- 
ated seven days a week. 

The latest official figures of hours of labor in 
tiie various industries are for 1914 and were 
published in 1917 in the Abstract of the Census 
of Manufactures. In these figures it appears 
that over 34,000 workers in steel works and 
rolling mills— 17 per cent, of all— were working 
72 liours or more per week, and of the 20,000 
men in blast furnaces, 69 per cent, of all were 
working 72 hours or over. Since then, the 
tendency has been to increase the length of the 
working week. 

So the strike is to reduce the hours of labor 
and to win back the right of workers in the 
mass to speak to their employers through rep- 
resentatives of their own choice. Hy a series of 
disastrous strikes, the most important being the 
Homestead strike of 1892. the attempted general 
strike of 1901 and tlie fight of the Amalgamated 
Association in 1909, the right of or.ganization 
and of^ collective bargaining had been utterly 
lost. For ten years there has been no or- 
ganization and no collective bargaining in the 
steel industry. Repeatedly efforts have been 
made to re-establish the right of organized 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



expression. Repeatedly it has been crushed by 
discharging the men who were responsible for 
the movement. During the recent campaign of 
organization every effort has been made to in- 
timidate the workers and thus to frustrate the 
campaign. In the Pittsburgh district, halls have 
been denied to the organizers and meetings on 
street corners and vacant lots have been broken 
up by the police. Where it was possible to 
hold meetings mill officials have taken the 
names of men attending. 

The first five of the demands announced by 
the organizing committee which is conducting 
the strike, deal with hours of labor and the right 
to organize. The others include wages, pro- 
motions, companj' unions and physical examina- 
tions. The wages of steel workers were ad- 
vanced greatly during the war. Wm. F. Ogburn 
of the National War Labor Board estimated, in 
December, 1918, that "real" wages of iron and 
steel workers, that is, wages in terms of pur- 
chasing power, had increased 45 per cent, since 
1914. At the present time the common labor 
rate for United States Steel Corporation em- 
ployes is 42 cents an hour. According to the 
report of the United States Steel Corporation 
for 1918, the average pay for all employes of 
all grades, high and low, amounted to $5.38 per 
day. 

The demand for the abolition of company 
unions is based on the fear that the repre- 
sentation plans recently adopted by a number 
of companies are not genuine and that they will 
be used to combat unionism. All organized labor 
objects to physical examinations when they 
have no control over the physician. They con- 
tend that such examinations are humiliating and 
that they can be used in a subtle way to black- 
list men who have been active in organization 
work. 

It has long been supposed that condtions in 
the Steel Corporation mills were ideal because 
of the large sums of money expended for safety 
and welfare work. Many have believed also 
that the plan of the corporation for selling stock 
to its employes would so link their interest 
with those of the corporation that they would 
not strike. The corporation has, it is true, an 
excellent record with respect to accidents. In its 
safety work it has been the leader of the in- 
dustries. Employes have subscribed eagerly for 
stock when offered. W^ith a system of deferred 
payments, and the extra dividends offered it has 
been an excellent investment. One of the great 
fallacies of modern industry, however, has been 
the thought that men would ever accept, in the 
long run, any substitute for freedom or any 
bonus in payment for giving it up. In the steel 
industry for more than twenty years men have 
not been free. It remains to be seen whether 
this is to be their year of emancipation. — John 
A. Fitch, in "The Survey." 



A POSTHUMOUS MEMOIR. 



The sudden and untimely death of 
Attorney Francis R. Wall in the collision 
last week between a Key Route electric 
train and an automobile on which Mr. 
Wall was a passenger, makes the reading 
of his autobiography, which follows, a 
sorrowful task to his many surviving 
friends. It was found among his personal 
effects after his death. We do not know 
what purpose Mr. Wall had in view in 
writing it. It may be that he had a pre- 
sentiment of the fate that overtook him, 
and wanted to leave a short biographical 
sketch of his life for the information of 
those whom he counted among his friends. 

And Mr. Wall had many friends. His 
sterling qualities of heart and head en- 
deared him to all who came in personal 
contact with him, whether on formal or 
informal occasions. His standing as a 
member of the legal profession was of the 
highest. To his numerous seafaring clients 
he was more of a personal friend than an 
attorney. Often he dug down into his 
own pocket to help one of "the boys" to 
carry a case through court. Now that he 
is gone he will be missed by none more 
than the seamen whom he "helped over 
the stile" in the hour of their need. 

Biography of'F. R. Wall. 

(Written by himself.) 
I was born in Clinton. East Feliciana Parish, 
Louisiana, July 10, 1859. During school age, 
went to school there and in Woodville, Miss. 
In each place worked in the local newspaper 
office as carrier and typesetter. Appointed, after 
competitive examination, a cadet midshipman 
in the U. S. Navy in 1876, and was graduated 



from ^ the U. S. Naval Academy in 1880; two 
years' sea service thereafter with the North 
Atlantic Squadron as cadet midshipman and 
then received a warrant as midshipman; was a 
midshipman for a few months, and then was 
commissioned an ensign (junior grade); com- 
missioned a full ensign a few months later, and 
continued to be an ensign until I resigned in 
1888. During nearly all of the time between 
1880 and 1886, I was on sea duty on some 
vessel of the North Atlantic .Squadron. On duty 
at the Hydrographic Office in Washington, D. 
C, for a few months during the summer of 
1886. and was then ordered to take charge of 
the Branch Hydrographic Office at New Or- 
leans, Louisiana, and there I remained until 
April (I think) 1888. During the time I was 
in New Orleans, I took the regular law course 
in the evenings at Tulane Universtiy, and was 
graduated therefrom in 1888. I was ordered to 
the War College, at Newport, Rhode Island, in 
April or May, 1888, and on the way there from 
New Orleans became engaged, at Bayonne, N. 
T, to Miss Louise Herrick. On duty at the 
War College until June 30, 1888, when I re- 
signed. 

After resigning, I went to Tacoma, Washing- 
ton Territory, remained there about two months, 
during which time I was admitted to practice 
law in all of the courts of the Territory. I was 
also admited by the Supreme Court after the 
Territory became a State. 

After a few months in Tacoma, I went to 
Aberdeen, on Grays Harbor, in Southwestern 
Washington, bought the Aberdeen Herald, and 
ran it as an independent Democratic newspaper 
until July or August 1893, when I sold it. 
Married Miss I-ouise Herrick, at Bayonne, N. 
J., Oct. 24, 1889. After selling the Herald, I 
went to Tacoma for a few months, and then 
went to work on the "Oregonian," at Portland, 
Oregon. Worked on the "Oregonian" first as 
assistant telegraph editor and later as exchange 
editor until the outbreak of the War with 
Spain, when I volunteered and was commis- 
sioned a lieutenant (junior grade) in the Navy 
and was ordered to the "Brutus." We pro- 
ceeded to Manila, and I remained on duty in 
Manila until December, 1898, when I was 
ordered to the "Nero," came back to San Fran- 
cisco on that vessel, and was honorably dis- 
charged from the naval service in February, 
1899. 

I was admitted by the Supreme Court of 
California to practice in all of the courts of 
California, in April, 1899; a few months there- 
after, I was admitted to practice in the United 
States District Court for the Northern District 
of California, the United States Circuit Court 
for the same district, and the L^nited States 
Circuit Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. 

The greater part of my practice during the 
last fourteen years has been in admiralty in 
this United States District Court; and while I 
have a general admiralty practice, still a large 
part of it consists, and has always consisted, of 
claims of seamen for wages, for shortage of 
provisions, bad treatment, and for damages for 
personal injuries. 



THE COLONEL PLEADED GUILTY. 



Colonel Blank, he who had been such a 
tartar at ail inspections that his name was 
a byword in his regiment, was in the thick 
of the Argonne fighting and for six days 
he was unable to shave. For six days he 
was unable to pry the mud from his cloth- 
ing or rake it from his hair. And in this 
unfamiliar state he was hailed at the end 
of the sixth day by a doughboy who was 
seizing a moment of leisure to sh^ve by a 
mirror hung on a knife stuck in a tree. 
"Hey, there, buddie," the doughboy shout- 
ed. "Do you know you look like hell? 
Better come up and get a shave or Colonel 
Blank will land on you like a ton of 
bricks." Colonel Blank accepted the invi- 
tation. 



The three Pacific Coast States of Wash- 
ington, Oregon and California will have 
contributed 3,721,524 deadweight tons of 
ships at the close of the 1919 shipbuilding 
programme, according to the approximate 
figures given out' by the United States 
Shipping Board. In all 472 ships will 
have been added to the American mer- 
chant marine since the intensive war-time 
shipbuilding began to "bridge the Atlan- 
tic" in the battle waged against the Ger- 
man submarines. 



TRICKS OF TROPIC PLANTS. 



That plants eat and drink in their own 
way through the soil is a well known fact. 
But in South America is a species of 
orchid which takes a drink whenever it 
feels thirsty simply by letting down a 
tube into the water. When not in use, 
the tube is coiled up on the top of the 
plant. 

In Mexico there is a plant that likes to 
change its attire three times a day just 
like any fastidious person — it is white in 
the morning, red at noon, and blue in the 
evening. At times it gives out a very 
strong perfume and at other times it is 
absolutely odorless. There is another odd 
Mexican plant the odor of which causes 
people to lose their way and makes their 
sense of direction nil until the smell 
ceases. 

Central India owns a tree whose leaves 
are heavily charged with electricity and 
merely to touch them gives a person a dis- 
tinct shock. In Brazil similar electric 
power is put to lighting purposes. Within 
the immediate vicinity of such a plant a 
person can see well enough to read the 
finest print and another is so luminous 
that it can be plainly distinguished in the 
darkest nights for a distance of more 
than a mile. 

But the most wonderfully constituted 
plant of Brazil is the ball-throwing one. 
It is a small fungus about the size of a 
pea which projects a ball to a distance of 
several inches with a distinctly audible re- 
port. 



The Turkish crescent, although now re- 
garded as essentially Mohammedan in sig- 
nificance, is, it appears, of Christian origin. 
A crescent moon was the emblem of the 
Byzantine Empire and of the Eastern 
Church. The Turks adopted it as a badge 
of triumph after the capture of Constanti- 
nople in 1453. With reference to the cres- 
cent, the story of the origin of the crescent- 
shaped Vienna roll is of curious interest. 
It arose in the sixteenth century, when the 
Turks were besieging Vienna. Failing to 
carry the city by assault, they began to 
mine the walls. At that period the city's 
bakehouses were in the walls under the 
fortifications, and when the mines were 
almost through the sound of the work 
was heard in the underground bakehouses, 
and an alarm was given. To celebrate this 
event the bakers of Vienna adopted the 
Turkish emblem as the form in which to 
mold and bake their bread. 



An Eastern aeroplane and motor corpo- 
ration received recently from an Illinois 
farmer a bill for $100 for use of his wheat 
field as a landing place for an airplane. In 
a flight recently from Millington Field, 
Tennessee, to Chicago, a pilot found it 
necessary to alight for gasoline. There 
being no landing field in sight he dropped 
into what looked to him from the air like 
a meadow. It proved to be a wheat field. 
.'\ttracted by the machine, the residents 
of the vicinity flocked to the field despite 
the protests of the owner, and the grain 
was trampled under foot. As the pilot, 
his gasoline supply replenished, arose from 
the field the indignant farmer called after 
him : "I got your number, young feller !" 
The bill to the corporation was the result. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Get National Pact. 

While the Steel Trust and other anti-union 
employers are attempting to hold back the 
tides of time the United States Railroad Ad- 
ministration has signed a national agreement 
with the railway employes' department of the 
American Federation of Labor, in which 
hours of labor, working conditions and rates 
of pay are provided for the 500,000 railroad 
shop men on all roads under Government 
operation. 

The interested unions are the international 
organizations of Machinists, Boiler Makers, 
Sheet Metal Workers, Blacksmiths, Electrical 
Workers and Railway Carmen. 

The agreement recognizes the right of the 
American Federation of Labor affiliates to 
represent and negotiate for their respective 
groups. The following are some of the im- 
portant principles established : 

Eight-hour day, with extra pay for over- 
time. 

Abolition of piece work, bonus and pre- 
mium systems. 

Personal injury cases may be handled 
by committees or representatives in the 
same manner as grievances are handled. 

Rules for the handling of grievances 
through committees with railroad officials. 

Craft point seniority established and defi- 
nite avenues of promotion outlined. 

Rates of pay retroactive to May 1, 1919, 
and a thirty days' clause for amending the 
agreement. 

Where a shop man is engaged outside 
the shop, he shall receive his standard 
pay. Formerly, if a machinist, for instance, 
was employed in signal maintenance he re- 
ceived a lesser rate, but the agreement pro- 
vides that a machinist is a machinist regard- 
less of where he does machinist work. 

Acting President Jewell of the railway 
shop employes' department states that this 
is the first national agreement ever secured 
by any labor organization or group of labor 
organizations in this country. He shows that 
all other agreements secured by trade unions 
have applied to divisions or sections of the 
country and that the present agreement is 
the result of a development of national 
federation, starting with craft unions in the 
various shops, then shop federations and 
then railroad system federations. These fed- 
erations are now formed into four geographi- 
cal divisions and are represented by the rail- 
road employes' department of the American 
Federation of Labor. 



Steel Mills Tied Up. 

While steel interests are claiming they 
are satisfied with the strike situation the 
following excerpts from a report by A. 
F. of L. Organizer Streifler to Frank Mor- 
rison, Secretary of the American Federation 
of Labor, gives an idea of the Buffalo situ- 
ation : 

"We had the large Lackawanna steel 
plant, with an enrollment of 60 per cent, 
before the strike, closed up tight by noon 
of Tuesday, September 23. The response 
from the Donner Steel Company located in 
this city was by far more than could be 
expected because we only had an enroll- 
ment of less than 100 of nearly 5000 em- 



ployed. All these workers have responded 
to the call and the plant was closed in its 
entirety. On the second day of the strike 
there was some disorder which was en- 
gineered and provoked by the Lackawanna 
Steel Company, which resulted in the death 
of two of our members, one of whom had 
just returned from doing valiant and heroic 
duty in the American army. About a 
dozen others were injured from the gun 
shots, all of which were fired from the 
side where the special police of the plant 
were located. No shot or weapon of any 
kind was used on our side. This fact is 
conceded by the chief of police and tiie 
representatives of the public who were 
near at hand. Our local committee has en- 
gaged attorneys to defend our members who 
have been charged with assault and rioting 
and we will insist that the proper authorities 
proceed with a thorough investigation of 
this matter and bring all those who are 
guilty to the bar of justice." 



Policemen Explain. 

The human side of the Washington police- 
man, his despairing struggle to support a 
family and educate his children, is graphic- 
ally and forcibly portrayed in the evidence 
given the House committee now holding 
an investigation to determine whether they 
are entitled to an advance in wages. The 
evidence presented reveals the fact that they 
were forced to seek some means of remedy- 
ing the outstanding injustices they were be- 
ing subjected to. Realizing that the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor had in many in- 
stances assisted in having complaints of 
other Government employes greatly im- 
proved, they naturally turned to it in their 
dire distress for s)"mpathy and help. Being 
cordially welcomed and a charter granted 
they hoped to secure the improved condi- 
tions they sought. 

One policeman who appeared before the 
House committee now making the investi- 
gation stated that he had been on the police 
force for fifteen years. He explained that 
he had six children and received a salary 
of $130 a month, on duty every day. When 
relieved of duty at 4 :30 p. m. he was com- 
pelled to accept work at an industrial plant 
and was detained there until 9 and 10 p. 
m. to meet his expenses. By accepting the 
extra work he was able to add $19 a week 
to his income : Even that added sum hardly 
met his $200 a month expenditure to provide 
the bare necessaries for his family. When 
asked by the committee if he would like 
to give up his outside work, he said he 
would gladly do so in order to get ac- 
quainted with his children. He further in- 
formed the committee that the man who re- 
moved his garbage was really getting more 
salary than he was. 

A second policeman informed the com- 
mittee that he had kept a careful record of 
his expenditures for eight months, and that 
they averaged $174.47, and did not permit 
him to indulge in the luxury of either to- 
bacco or cigars, refuting the accusation that 
had been made that poHcemen were living 
extravagantly. Following is a detailed state- 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA, 

I-'edcrated Seamen's Union of Australasia, 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Au»< 

tralia. 
26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 
Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 

New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
r.ondon E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 

vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Internationale Transportarbeiter - Federation, 
F-ngelufer, 18, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 



scripts, Maritimes des 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale 
General a Bord, 3 Rue 



France, 33 Rue 



Grange 

Service 



des Agents du 
Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev Wedels 
plads 5, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundt, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten IB., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Centrale Bond van Transportarbeiders, Hoofd- 
bestuur, 's Gravendykwal 111 te Rotterdam. 

Vakgroep Zeelieden, Pelikaanstraat 25, Rotter- 
dam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratort del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina IS, Austria. 
SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo des Empregados em Camara, 
Rua des Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Workers 



Evidence accumulates tending to 
show that, at the behest of the En-' 
tente at Paris, Germany is being 
made a recruiting ground against the 
Soviet government of Russia. 

Some 20,000 workmen in the min-^ 
iature duchy of Luxembourg recently ^ 
made a demonstration against the 
cost of living and attacked the Par- 
liament building and the palace of 
the duchess. The demonstration, 
while ostensibly against the H. C. of 
L., was also political in character, 
and was designed to call public at- 
tention to the fact that the workers 
of Luxembourg are through with 
royalty and all its trappings, and in- 
sist upon a republic. "Law and or- 
der" was established by French sol- 1 
diers who came to the aid of the 
Luxembourg troops. 

There is lying to-day at the pits 
on the Asturian (Spain) coal fields 
a stock of some 800,000 tons of coal.j 
The smaller mines have closed down 
and out of some 30,000 miners em- 
ployed about 7,000 are out of work, 
and this number is likely to increase. 
To make matters worse, mine own- 
ers have notified the workmen that 
a general reduction of one peseta. 
(20 cents) a day will be made in all 
wages. This announcement has 
caused great disconcert among the 
miners, who complain of the enor- 
mous rise in the cost of necessities.^ 

The Communist Party of Mexico 
has been organized following a split | 
in the National Socialist Party at, 
the close of the first national con- 
gress of the latter in this city. I 
Adolfe Santibanez, former interna- 1 
tional secretary of the National 
Socialist party, and the organizer of, 
the Socialist Party in Mexico, has 
lieen named international secretary 
of the Communist Party, provision- 
ally, and Enrique H. Arce as provis- 
ional national secretary. A provis- 
ional executive committee has been 
named for the Communist Party, 
consisting of Comrades Santibanez, 
Arce, Geo. Barreda, Linn A. E. Gale, 
Fulgencio C. Luna, H. William Het- 
rick, Magdalena E. Gale and J. C. 
Parker. Arrangements are being 
rushed for the national congress of 
the Communist Party which will be 
held in Mexico City in November. 
The address of the Communist Party 
for the present will be P. O. Box 
518, Mexico City. 

How, year after year, the power 
of resistance of the people of In- 
dia to British militarism is reduced, 
is indicated by the number of li- 
censes issued for arms to natives 
during the period of five years: 

No. of Licenses for 
Year Arms in Force 

1913 182,412 

1914 176,779 

1915 167,242 

1916 137,183 

1917 136,707 

The area of British India is 1,093,- 
074 square miles, its population 244,- 
267,542, and the number of its towns 
and villages 538,809. There is then 
one license in every 9 or. 10 square 
miles, one man out of every 1800 
possesses a license, and there is one 
license for every 4 towns and vil- 
lages taken together. The emancipa- 
tion of the people of India is ob- 
viously not likely to come via the 
gun and the cannon, but through the 
organized economic power of the 
Hindu workers. 



M. BROWN & SONS 

SAN PEDRO 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Exclusive Agents Florsheim and Douglas Shoes 

And the Best in Oil Clothing and Boots 

See them at M. BROWN & SONS 

109 SIXTH STREET Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 



FRERICHS NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

529i/j BEACON STREET. SAN PEDRO. CAL. 
Seafaring people who desire to take up navigation, San Pedro, situated In 
the sunny south, is the ideal place. Captain Frerlchs has established a Nav- 
igation School here and under his undivided personal supervision students 
will be thoroughly prepared to pass successfully before the United States 
Steamboat InEpectorc. 

TERMS ARE REASONABLE 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Daniel Shean, last heard from at 
Cleveland, will kindly communicate 
with his brother, Richard Shean, 7014 
Cedar Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 

11-6-18 



For the benefit of the widow of 
John Karus, lost at sea, October 17, 
1918, at 2:15 a. m., according to the 
report in the official log of the bark- 
entine "Aurora," will all members of 
the crew of that vessel who know 
anything about the ship, the condi- 
tion of her rigging, before and after 
the accident, or anything that will 
tend to explain his disappearance, 
communicate with the undersigned 
attorney for the widow? — Silas Blake 
Axtell, No. 1 Broadway, New York 
City. 1-1-19 



I have been informed that a num- 
ber of attorneys have requested 
members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Abangarez" to file claims for sal- 
vage services rendered to the bark 
"Xinfra." For the information of 
such seamen, it might be said that 
a settlement has been effected in the 
sum of $50,000 through an arrange- 
ment made by me as representative 
of a few of the crew, with the at- 
torneys for the owners of the 
'Ahangarez." It is agreed that the 
crew shall receive one-fourth of the 
award, about $12,500. All the crew 
need to do to get their money is to 
apply to the owners. Members of 
the union applying here can get 
their funds without any charge what- 
soever for services rendered by this 
office. S. B. Axtell, 1 Broadway, 
New York, N. Y. 6-18-19 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



I am representing most of the 
crew of the S. S. "J. E. O'Neil," in 
the matter of their claim for salvage 
services rendered to the steamship 
"Oregon" on or about January 19, 
1918, about 300 miles od Honolulu. 
The following awards were made to 
the vessels which assisted in the 
salvage operations: Steamship "Lur- 
linc," her master, officers and crew, 
$18,000; steamship "President," her 
master, officers and crew, $1750; 
steamship "J. E. O'Neil," her mas- 
ter, officers and crew, $6872. One- 
quarter of the $6872 was allowed to 
the master, officers and crew of the 
"J. E. O'Neil." All those members 
of the crew who have not yet filed 
Iheir claims should do so at once 
in order that the claims of the en- 
tire crew will be presented at the 
same time. Silas B. .'\xtell. One 
Broadway, New York. 7-9-19 



S. G. SWANSON 

Established 1904 
For the BEST there Is In TAILORING 

Less the Fancy Prices 
NOTE — S. G. Swanson Is not connected 
with any dye works and has no solicitors. 
Clothes Made Also From Your Own Cloth 

Repairing, Cleaning and Pressing 
2a Floor, Bank of San Pedro, 110 W. 6th 8t. 
San Pedro, Los Angeles Waterfront, Gal. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

- Try - 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMBEN, Prop. 



Sailors' Outfitter 
BENJAMIN'S 

The Old Reliable 

CLOTHING. SHOES. HATS. RUBBER 

AND OIL. CLOTHING 

207 Second Street Eurska, Cal. 

E. BENJAMIN, ProD. 



Charles L. Carlsen, No. 1834, who 
disappeared from the barge "Isaac 
Reed" at Eureka, California, on De- 
cember 31, 1918, is inquired for by 
his wife, Mrs. C. L. Carlsen, 107 
Courtland Ave., San Francisco, Cal 



Reier Gundersen, alias Fred Wil- 
son, last heard of in New York in 
the year 1904, when he shipped on the 
S. S. "Pennsylvania." Anyone know- 
ing his whereabouts will please no- 
tify his brother, Borre Christian 
Gundersen, Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific. 59 Clav street, San Francisco, 
Calif. ' 10-15-19 

W'Vipn maWinp r>nrrViq<:*»c frr»m out 
nH vprtispr";, always mpntinn Tbf. 9pa 



HONOLULU LETTER LIST. 



I'rhikls. riinton S. 
, Dryer. O. 
I KE-fnPR. Nils 
JEtherton. ■\\'^ard 
Johnston, .Tohn O. 



I.arsen, .Tohn 
Krf>KPr. Lloyd F. 
Kllnt, Herman 
MItPhel. H. A. 
(seven letters) 



TnKebertser. Olaf E. Maki, Kaune 
-Tones. E. J. Geer, Van Harry 

Josephson, Wm. Nielsen, Christian F. 

Sewied, Ericht 



The following men: August Rosso, 
oiler; Robert Anser, oiler, and V. 
Florio, wiper, who were employed 
on the S. S. "Comet," on or about 
November 22nd, 1917, when John 
Olsen was injured through the leak- 
ing of a gland which caused his 
hand to .get tangled up in the motor, 
whereby he sustained severe and 
permanent injuries, will please com- 
municate with me without delay. 
They may furnish valuable evi- 
dence to assist Olsen in his suit 
against the Standard Transporta- 
tion Company. His injuries are very 
serious. S. B. Axtell, 1 Broadway, 
New York City. 



Members of the crew of the "John 
A. Kirby," who have not already 
filed their claims, should communi- 
cate with the undersigned. I have 
made arrangements to lile claims for 
families of seamen and ofiicers who 
were lost by submarine activities 
during the war; also for seamen 
who were injured by torpedoes, etc., 
or who were taken into Germany 
as prisoners. Such persons should 
communicate with me at earliest 
conve'iience in order to have their 
claims filed with the State Depart- 
ment. Silas B. Axtell, One Broad- 
way, New York. 7-23-19 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of VVoodley Ransome and Charles 
Bland, who were members of the tug 
"Virginian" when she was damaged 
by the "Navy Tug No. 4," will kindly 
communicate with Arthur Jones. 
\gcnt. Marine Firemen's, Oilers' and 
Watertenders' Union, 513 Main St., 
Norfolk, Va. 11-6-18 



Anyone knowing the wliereabouts 
of Calvin Pickett, last heard of in 
Port Arthur, Texas, February, 1918, 
wil! please notify G. Schroeder, 
Agent, Eastern and Gulf Sailors' 
Association, Port Arthur, Texas. 

7-9-19 




DO YOU KNOW 

That War-SavingB Stamps 
pay 4 per cent, compound in- 
terest? 

That W. S. S. cost $4.12 in 
January and one cent more 
each succeeding month of the 
year, reaching their highest 
price, $4.23, in December? 

That the 1919 W. S. S., 
known as the Franklin Issue, 
will be redeemed by the Gov- 
ernment on January 1, 1924, 
for five dollars? 

That the 1918 W. S. S. will 
be redeemed by the Govern- 
ment on January 1, 1923, for 
five dollars? 

That W. S. S. of either issue, 
if necessary, may be redeemed 
for value to date, as indicated 
on the W. S. S. Certificate, at 
any post office upon ten days' 
notice? 

That one thousand dollars' 
worth of W. S. S. is the maxi- 
mum amount allowed to any 
one purchaser? 

That Thrift Stamps cost 
twenty-five cents? And that 
sixteen Thrift Stamps are ex- 
changeable for an interest-bear- 
ing War-Savings Stamp? 



LET US SEND YOU 
THESE BOOKLETS: 

"The Great Iniquity." Iiy [.co Tolstoy. 

"Time versus Famine." Iiy K. F. Ingram. 

"The Single Tax: What it is." by Henr)' Ocoree. 

You will B''t tti'm ttith a trial siihscripllon for 14 
»cc-ks 10 The Public, a consirurtivp liberal weekly 
journal, high Kraile wltliout ln-ing lllchbrow. 

Kecommended by man)' of the best known educston 
in the country. 

I'rof. Wm, K. Dodd (the Historian). Rocer W. Bab- 
son (the Statlstirian). Kcrbert Quick (rhalrman Fed- 
eral Farm Loan Board), l-ouls F. Post (Assistant 
Secretary of Labor). John F. Moors (Mh^ral Membei 
Ilaruard Corporation I . write for The Public. 

U't us send you a Irla; su;isiTlpllon to The Piblle. 
U weeks, with the three booklets at our special price. 
$1.00. Write your name and address on the mamin 
and attach $1.00. We will refund If you don't like 
the paper. 
The Putlic, Educational Bld|., 70 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Information wanted regarding John 
Johnsen, native of Bergen, age 44, 
last heard from in New Orleans, 
1917, was then on schooner "Lizzie 
M. Parson," going to France. Any 
information will be appreciated by 
his brother, Andrew Johnsen, Sail- 
ors' Union, Seattle. Wash. 8-20-19 



\i 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The Shipping- Board steamer "West Ira" has 
been assigned to the shipping firm of Struthers 
& Dixon. 

Two thousand tons of freight is in sight for 
the "Mont Cenis" of the French line known 
as the Societe Generate de Transports Maritinies 
a Vapeur when she pays her first visit to 
Portland about October 29. The cargo, which 
is being assembled at the St. Johns terminals, 
consists chiefly of canned goods and lumber. 

Construction ot huge demountable lumber 
ships will be begun in Seattle within a few 
weeks, each vessel's hull and cargo consisting 
of five million to six million feet of lumber, 
worth approximately $250,000 here and $500,000 
in England. The ships will be built on either 
a salt-water site or a fresh-water site in Seattle 
under the supervision of J. H. Price, president 
of the J. H. Price Shipbuilding Company of 
Seattle. 

According to Washington advices received here 
Senator Jones is in favor of turning twelve big 
passenger and freight ships over to the Pacific 
trade on July 1, 1920. There is a question of 
what support this proposition will receive, as 
there is a big fight on between the various ports, 
each being anxious to secure as many of the big 
passenger and fi-eight vessels as possible. It is 
rumored that New Orleans has prepared to battle 
for a goodly share of these vessels and is so 
well entrenched that it is more than likely that 
the Dixie port will have a big fleet of the mod- 
ern carriers before the first is shifted to the 
waters of the Pacific. 

Lumber shipments from the Columbia River 
by water amounted to nearly 50,000,000 feet dur- 
ing_ September, which was one of the most 
active months of the present year in the 
lumber industry. According to statistics com- 
piled thirty-five vessels loaded at the mills in 
the lower river district, and their combined 
cargoes totaled 26,695,330 feet of lumber, twen- 
ty-seven of these vessels carrying 22,494,000, 
going to California: seven_ vessels laden with 
3,716,296 feet, went to foreign ports, while one 
vessel carrying 485,034 feet is en route to the 
Atlantic seaboard. In the same period 21,140,802 
feet of lumber were loaded on vessels at the 
mills in the upper river district, making a grand 
total of 47,836,132 feet of lumber, which left 
the Columbia River in cargoes during the month 
just closed. 

The old whaler "Belvedere," which was op- 
erated to the Arctic from San Francisco for 
many years, has been wrecked in the ice of? 
Cape Serge, Alaska, according to Seattle advices 
received at San Francisco. The crew was saved 
and the United States cutter "Bear" has been or- 
dered to steam for the scene of the wreck. 
The "Belvedere" was built at Bath, Me., in 1880, 
was 339 tons register, 140 feet in length, 31 
feet in width and 17 feet deep. The vessel was 
one of the early steam whalers, and was re- 
cently sold by the local owners to Hibberd. 
Seward & Co. of New Bedford. The "Belvedere" 
sailed from Seattle for the Arctic on a whaling 
and trading expedition five months ago. 

Information has reached San Francisco ship- 
ping circles of the intention of the International 
Merchant Marine to immediately restore the 
steamships "Kroonland" and "Finland" to the 
San Francisco-European runs they filled before 
the_ war. The steamers have been released to 
their owners and the necessary reconditioning 
is now under way. When this is finished the 
old runs will be resumed. Incidentally, the com- 
pany is expected to increase the fleet of Pacific 
Mail steamers operating between San Francisco 
and the^^Far East. This will incluJe four liners 
of the "Martha Washington" type at once, and 
later, when they are available, several new 
17.500 ton ships. 

The Matson liner "Matsonia," recently re- 
leased from the transnort service on the Atlan- 
tic, will leave New York for this port Decem- 
ber 1 with ISO passengers, it was announced 
recently by Matthew Lindsay, traffic manager 
of the Matson Line. General Passenger Agent 
William Sellender Has left for New York and 
will have charge of the passenger bookings. 
According to Lindsay there is a brisk demand 
for transportation from prominent Americans 
who desire to make the voyage between the 
Atlantic and Pacific bv the way of the Panama 
Canal. The "Matsonia" is being reconditioned at 
Norfolk and will resume the former service be- 
tween this port and Honolulu immediately after 
arrival here. 

The ancient old barge "William H. Smith," 
launched at Bath, Me., more than thirty years 
ago and in recent years used as a lumber barge 
by the Charles Nelson Company, is being re- 
built and changed into a five-m'asted schooner 
at the Tibbetts yards at Alameda. Although the 
vessel is one of the oldest on the coast, the 
timbers of the hull are strong and well pre- 
served and are in condition to withstand many a 
hard trip on the Pacific. A goodly portion' of 
the vessel above the water line is being rebuilt, 
and when the craft is rigged and ready for duty 
she will, to all intents and purposes, be as good 



as new. Nelson & Co. expect to place the vessel 
in the ofif-shore lumber trade. 

A new direct steamship line between Pacific 
Coast ports and the Mediterranean will be 
opened October 29, according to Count de Fay- 
olle, managing director of Societe Generale de 
Transports Maritimes a Vapeur, a French ship- 
ping concern. Count Favolle arrived in Seattle 
recently to confer with local shipping men with 
reference to the new service. He was accom- 
panied by S. H. Norton of Norton, Lilly & 
Company, New York shipping agents, and W. 
J. Edwards, Pacific Coast representative of the 
Norton, Lilly Company. The first ship to arrive 
in Seattle under the new service will be the 
"Mont Cenis," a 6700-ton steel steamship. Other 
ports of call will be Vancouver, B. C, and San 
Francisco. The November steamship is en route. 
Direct connection with the West Indies will be 
made and the service will open the markets of 
Southern Europe to the Pacific Coast and vice 
versa. Only general cargo will be handled at 
first. 

Petitions are being circulated requesting the 
port of Coos Bay to issue bonds for $200,000 
with which to construct a dredge for the inlets 
and to purchase water front for public docks. 

The strike of machinists at Honolulu will af- 
fect the repairs on the numerous "lame wooden 
ducks" that are now at the island port, unable to 
proceed to sea until considerable work has been 
done. The freighters "West Cactus," "Benoni" 
and "Eastern Queen" are in trouble. The latter 
vessel has condenser trouble and the "Benoni" 
needs a new propeller. According to officials of 
the Shipping Board considerable sums have been 
expended constantly at Honolulu for repairing 
the various units of the Government fleet. The 
work of repairing ships has increased by several 
hundred per cent, at Flonolulu since the Shipping 
Board got into the shipping game, and the con- 
sequent increase in the number of men em- 
ployed in the islands has resulted in a huge in- 
crease in wages and the cost of having the re- 
pair work done. 

A ruling which will work disaster to Seattle 
and other of the principal ports of the Pacific 
Coast, according to J. F. Douse, president of 
the Seattle Importers and Exporters' Association, 
has been made by the United States Railroad 
Administration in taxing imported goods $1.20 
per ton unless such goods are reshipped from 
the dock and in the original package within ten 
days. Douse declared that such a ruling works 
to the great disadvantage of all Pacific ports, 
and that it will ultimately result in the oil im- 
porting traffic from Asia being driven to a rout- 
ing through the Panama Canal with delivery at 
New York. He points out that the only way 
Pacific Coast ports can comply with the regula- 
tion and hold the import business — especially 
that of vegetable oils — would be to move their 
great storage tanks and terminals in which more 
than $25,000,000 has been invested by the vari- 
ous larger ports to points ten or fifteen miles in 
the interior. This, of course, he holds could not 
be done. The ruling. Douse claims, works to 
the great advantage of terminals on the Atlan- 
tic, with at the same time a trade-killing effect 
to ports on the Pacific Coast. 

The United States Shipping Board has signed 
a contract with the Marconi Wireless Company 
which provides that the wireless concern is to 
take over the maintenance of the radio sets on 
40O of the Shipping Board vessels, Arthur A. 
Isabell, Pacific Coast manager of the company 
recently announced. It is expected that later 
the contract will be extended to cover all of 
the 1200 ships of the Government's mercantile 
fleet. When the war broke out and the Govern- 
ment began the operation of the ships, the Navy 
took over the wireless and the ship sets were 
manufactured from specifications made up by 
the Marconi concern. Later the ship owners 
were given the choice of either purchasing the 
sets on board their various craft or else re- 
move them and purchase other sets. Many pre- 
ferred the latter and in t)irn private sets from 
the Marconi company were purchased. Isbell 
said that his company had no intention of op- 
erating any of the small shore stations in the 
future, as they preferred to devote their entire 
attention to developing the big stations to be 
used for off-shore commercial purposes. The 
company nians to have a full corps of efficient 
oneratcrs on hand to supply the ships and for 
this purpose the school for students will turn 
out numerous graduates right along The ship 
owners prefer to lease the ship sets in most 
instances, because this has been found the most 
satisfactory wav. Frequent changes and im- 
provements made in the wireless make the old 
sets obsolete in a few years and those leasing 
thus have the advantage of receiving the benefit 
of the new iir,])royements without extra cost. 

F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the TTnited States Navy, is now prac- 
ticincr mnrine law in .San Fnncisro. He gives 
claims of nil seafarers carf-fnl attention 324 
ATcrchants F.xchanee Bide.. 3rd Floor. California 
St., nr. Montgomery. Phone. Sutter 5807 (Adv ) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 




Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 

and 

INTERNATIONAL SEAFARERS' FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary. 

328-332 West Randolph St., Chicago. 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS- 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mass PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary 

1%A Lewis Street 
Branches: 

BALTIMORE. Md aPOLF KILE. Agent 

802-804 South Broadway Street 
NEW YORK CITY....GUSTAVE H. BROWN, Agent 

51 South Street 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa... OSCAR CHRISTIANSEN, Agt. 

206 Moravian Street 

NORFOLK, Va dan INGRAHAM, Agent 

54 Commercial Place 

NEWPORT NEWS. Va T. NELSON, Agent 

123 Twenty-third Street 
MOBILE, Ala w p pattt^tt a 

NEW ORTFa't^^^ .^°"*^ Michae.'^St^e^er'''^'^' ^^^"' 

NEW ORLEANS La o. MORTENSEN Agent 

400% Fulton Street ^ 



PORT ARTHUR, Tex,... 



•■•D. F. PERRY, Agent 



132 Proctor Street 

GALVESTON, Tex JOHN CLAUSEN, Agent 

321 Twentieth Street 
PROVIDENCE, R. I H. BLANKE, Agent 

PORTLAND, M^:^^°".*^.— .c^-|,1kTELL. Agent 
5 Ex chan ge Street 

iir T • ^- 'jRlrl'IN, President 

W. L. CARTLEDGE, Secretary-Treasurer 
New yn,J nr^J'^T Bowling Green 8840-8m "^" 
New Yo.K B--VGVeenw,ch°-St^ee?«^^«^' ^-"* 
BOSTON. ^^--•-••.'^^'"*:';".. A. MARTIN. Agent 
NEW ORLEANS. L^a.":""^ ^^T KAIZER A . 

99S Taf.;;.!.'*;;,'^; j- kaizer. Agent 

KCmvm IT v„ Lafayette Street 

NORFOLK. Va.. WM. QUINN. Agent 

54 Commercal Place 

NEWPORT NEWS WM. .). SIGGERS A^ent 

127 Twenty-third Street ' *^ "* 

BALTIMORE. Md F R STOPT^T a 

o„TT,r. S02-R04 South •ftroa?wav^^^^' "^^^"^ 

PHILADELPHIA Pa O. CHRISTIANSEN. Sub. Agt. 

206 Moravian Streel 
MOBILE, Ala ...... C. RAVING, Sub. Agent 

„^„ 1"'' South Commerce Street ■ 

PORT ARTHUR, Tex...G. SCHROEDER, Sub. Agent 

132 Proctor Street 
GALVESTON. Tex J. CLAUSEN. Sub. Agent 

220 Twentieth Street 

'^^SL'^^ FIREIV1EN. OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF 

Headquarters: 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 



.70 South Street 



Telephone John 975 and 976 
^,„„ New York Branches: 

RROOKT^YM- M- I l*"* Eleventh Avenue 

BROOKLYN, N. Y .no Hamilton Avenue 

rYIV^moI^p"';^;, Pa.°!'^".''.'!l3R South Second Street 

PO^r"^ APTmm^^''?r ^^ ^'-^ Twenty-third Street 

PORT ARTHUR. Tex LS") Proctnr .'^tr^ef 

GALVESTON. Tex 321% 20th Street 

SS?X9>'TV^-^?r^-^ 3 Long Wharf 

NORFOLK, Va 5]3 East Main Street 

NEW ORLEANS, La 40"% Fnlton Streel 

MOBILE, Ala fiOVa St. Michael Street 

PROVIDENCE, R. 1 492 South Water Street 

PORTLAND, Maine 5 Exchange Street 

FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE ATLANTIC. 
Headquarters: 

BOSTON, Mas.s 202 Atlantic Avenue 

Branches: 

GLOUCESTER. Mass 163 Main Street 

NEW YORK, N. Y JOHN R. FOLAN, Agent 

111 South Street 

PORTLAND, Maine WM. HOLLAND, Agent 

IS Commercial Wharf 

PROVINCETOWN, Mass 

FRANK L. RHODERICK, Agent 

Commercial Street 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. Y 

HARRY F. McGARRIGEL, Agent 

700 North Rhode Island Avenue 
NEW BEDFORD, Mass. CnART,KS E. DOUCETT, Agt. 

LAKE DISTRICT. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE GREAI LAKES. 
Headquarters: 

CHICAGO, III THOS. A. HANSON, Treasurer 

328 W. Randolph Street, Phone Franklin 278 

BUFFALO, N. Y GEORGE HANSEN, Agent 

55 Main Street, Phone Seneca 5F;ss 

CLEVELAND, O GEO. L. MARTIN, Agent 

308 W. Superior Avenue, Phone Main 1842 

MILWAUKEE, Wis..,.CHAS. BRADHBRING, Agent 

162 Reed Street 

DETROIT, Mich K. B. NOLAN, Agent 

44 Shelby Street, Phone Cherry 342 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 47 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO. O S R, DYE. Agent 

618 Front Street, Phone Bell Navarre 1823 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. O ;OHN MORRIS, Agent 

992 Dny Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. T 

PATRICK O'BRIEN, Ajrent 

122% Main Street. Phone 890 

SOUTH CHICAGO, III 9214 Hsrbor Avenue 

Phone South Chicago ]B9<> 

SUPERIOR. Wis SS2 Binks Avouue 

(Continual on Pace 11.) 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



The Seamen's Journal 

Published weekly at San Francisco 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

8. A. SILVER Business Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $3.00 | Six months - - - $1.50 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Business and Editorial Office, Maritime Hall Building, 

59 Clay Street, San Francisco. Telephone Kearny 2228. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of Octo- 
ber 3, 1917, authorized September 7, 1918. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published In the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WFDXESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1919. 



A NEW STEAMSHIP LINE. 



San Francisco will soon be the western 
terminus of a new line of steamers, Philadel- 
l)hia to be the eastern terminus. Word was 
received here a week or so ago that four 
new 9000-ton cargo steamers will be placed 
in operation between the Quaker City and 
this port by a concern recently organized 
and financed by Pennsylvania steel interests. 

The vessels have been built by the Pensa- 
cola Shipbuilding Company, and the first of 
the number will be delivered at Philadelphia 
on October 15. This pioneer of the fleet is 
scheduled to sail for San Francisco on her 
maiden voyage November 1. 

The name of the new concern has not yet 
been announced, but will probably be made 
known in a few days more. In the meantime 
a special representative of the concern is in 
San Francisco making the necessary arrange- 
ments for the installation of the line, includ- 
ing suitable berthing facilities. An applica- 
tion has been filed with the Board of Harbor 
Commissioners for the assignment to the 
new company of one of the piers on the 
south side of Market street. Mr. McCallum, 
president of the Board, has replied that he 
expects the assignment to be made in ample 
time to make it possible to handle the first 
arrival at the regular pier decided upon. 

The service, as now contemplated, will 
begin with a sailing from each terminus 
every two weeks. Later, when the fleet is 
increased, it is planned to have a weekly 
service, equal in volume and tonnage to that 
maintained by the American Hawaiian S. S. 
Company before the war. 
■ As stated before the projectors of the new 
line are interested in steel. Their investment 
of money in ships has been made chiefly with 
the end in view of cutting the cost of trans- 
portation of their steel products to San Fran- 
cisco and other Pacific Coast ports. The 
present freight rate on steel products shipped 
to this coast by rail from points on the At- 
lantic seaboard is about $1.37j^ cents per 
hundred pounds. This rate, it is figured, will 
be cut nearly in two by the all-water route 
about to be inaugurated by the new company. 



The parties who will benefit the most from 
this contemplated cut in freight rates are the 
shipbuilders of the Pacific Coast. These gen- 
tlemen have long maintained that the exces- 
sive freight rates on the raw materials they 
used constituted a great handicap when bid- 
ding on contracts against eastern competitors. 

Not long ago they showed figures proving 
that freight charges on the steel used in the 
construction of the average 9000-ton vessel 
amounts to more than $80,000. And they 
have invariably made these figures the basis 
for all refusals of wage increases demanded 
by the shipyard workers. 

It will thus be seen that the shipyard 
workers on the Pacific Coast have a direct 
personal interest in the projected steamship 
service between Philadelphia and San Fran- 
cisco. So also have the producers of Cali- 
fornia, for it goes without saying that the 
ships bringing steel cargoes here will not go 
hack to the Atlantic Coast empty if they can 
get return cargoes. And with the' tempting 
freight rates oflfered, as compared with those 
exacted by the railroads, there should be no 
difficulty whatever in having the ships loaded 
to capacity with California produce every 
time they leave this port. The more so as 
the lower cost of transportation will enable 
California producers to reduce their prices 
in the East, thus increasing the demand for 
their products in that section. 



JAPAN'S LABOR TROUBLES. 



The industrial and political conditions in 
Japan are not nearly so tranquil as the 
usual pictures painted of the land of geishas 
and chrysanthemums would have us be- 
lieve. Late cable advices make that tolerably 
plain. Apart from their troubles in Korea, 
Shantung and elsewhere, the Mikado's "elder 
statesmen" are having their hands full at 
home with keeping the sulTering, ill-paid 
masses from kicking over the traces. The 
economic situation is described as the worst 
ever. Outrageously high prices of neces- 
saries, and the scarcity of houses, are causing 
widespread discontent. The police every- 
where are being kept busy with little else 
than breaking up and dispersing mass meet- 
ings of workers. And they are not all as- 
semblages of manual workers by any means. 
Teachers, clerks, writers and the like middle 
class wage-earners arc just as restless and 
dissatisfied with their condition. In Tokio 
recently they formed a "Salaried Men's 
Union." It is rather significant that their 
only demand was for more pay. Shorter 
hours or other ameliorative conditions were 
not insisted upon, the all overshadowing 
issue being more money with which to buy 
food. 

The general unrest ferment is even said 
to have permeated the ranks of government 
employees and the army. The newspapers, 
when they are allowed to function, solemnly 
warn the Government that Socialism will 
engulf the nation if the enormous increase 
in the cost of rice and cotton cloth is not 
immediately reduced. When it is considered 
that rice is the national staff of life in 
Japan, and cotton the main staple in dress, 
the ominous import of the warning will be 
understood. In short, the general situation 
over there seems to have reached a point 
where a revolution looms up as a by no 
means remote possibility. 

A good line on the trend of the times in 
Japan is given in a recent Associated Press 
item. A few weeks ago a meeting was 



called in Tokio to elect delegates to the Inter- 
national Labor Congress which will convene 
at Washington in the near future. The 
Minister of Agriculture and Commerce de- 
livered the opening address. Our old friend, 
B. Suzuki, well known to organized labor 
both in Europe and America, then took the 
floor and attacked the Government's methods 
of choosing the delegates. An uproar was 
caused when he boldly charged that two- 
thirds of the delegates present represented 
capital and not labor, and that they had 
secured their nominations by questionable 
means. To prove his accusations he read a 
number of letters from workingmen alleging 
that they had been coerced into nominating 
the labor delegates from their respective dis- 
tricts. Later Mr. Suzuki and many others 
walked out of the meeting as a protest 
against the Government's treacherous meth- 
ods of dealing with the workers. 

From the foregoing it is quite evident that 
the Japanese are enjoying to the full all the 
blessings of occidental civilization — if the 
sorry mess that the white races have made 
of life on this planet can be called civiliza- 
tion. 



NEW USE FOR AIRPLANES. 



Airplanes, like automobiles, are being put 
to many uses these days that their inventors 
in all probability never thought of. One of 
the latest is to have them chase after and 
overhaul steamers at sea for the purpose of 
placing delayed mail on board. It is calcu- 
lated that their speed is ever so much greater 
than that of even the fastest "ocean grey- 
hound," that they should have no difficulty 
in overhauling the ordinary type of steamer 
as many as three or four hours after she 
has left port. 

Supplementing this initial plan it is also 
proposed that steamers shall carry small air- 
planes of their own. Then when a steamer 
neared port she could despatch one of her 
airplanes loaded with mailbags to make port 
several hours ahead of her own scheduled 
arrival. In this manner it is saitl that in 
the transatlantic mail service, what with over- 
hauling outbound steamers and relieving in- 
bound ones of their mail as outlined, from 
eight to twelve hours could be saved from 
the time now consumed in making the run. 

The method employed for placing mail 
on board of a steamer at sea is to be about 
as follows : 

The mailbags will be made of waterproof 
material, and tightly closed. Attached to 
each bag will be a buoy of suitable size. 
When the airplane has overhauled the ship 
it will fly ahead of her and drop the bags 
in the water. The ship in the meantime 
will slow down a bit and lower a small 
power launch over the side. The launch will 
pick up the mail bags and forthwith be 
hoisted on board again. And away speeds 
the ship on her course. 



The Emergency Fleet Corporation an- 
nounces that, from the beginning of the war 
up to date, American shipyards have built 
and launched a total of 1468 vessels of a 
combined deadweight tonnage of 8,109,059. 

That will probably stand as a record 
achievement of its kind during the life of 
the present generation, and maybe forever. 
To a world grown sadder but wiser — like 
ours has, let us hope — one experience like 
that which called forth our unprecedented 
shipbuilding spurt should be a-plenty. 



n 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Another of San Francisco's old landmarks, 
the Sailors' Home in Harrison street between 
Main and Spear, is slated for the scrapheap. 
The site, it is said, is needed for a more 
utilitarian and up-to-date purpose. Demoli- 
tion of the building will probably be under 
way by the time this appears in print. 

The old Home has withstood well the wear 
and tear of time since its erection in 1848, 
even coming through the earthquake and fire 
in 1906 without a scratch. It is related by 
the oldtimers that every brick in the building 
was brought here via Cape Horn in the hold 
of a windjammer. In its day the Home has 
sheltered tens of thousands of sailormen. 
Among them have been some of the hardest 
cases that ever trod a ship's deck or laid out 
on a yard, many of them celebrated in fore- 
castle songs and stories of the clipper ship 
era. And yarn spinners ! If it be true that 
walls have ears, what wonderful tales of the 
seven seas the walls of that old Sailors' Home 
must have heard in their day! 



The Shipping Board, through its chair- 
man, recently issued the following statement : 

There is no change in the price at which ves- 
sels of the United States Shipping- Board are 
being held, and none is contemplated. The 
wooden ships are being held at $90 per dead- 
weight ton, the new steel freighters at a price 
that ranges from $210 per deadweight ton for 
the smaller type to $225 per deadweight ton 
for the larger vessels. No immediate sale oi 
passenger steamships is being contemplated. 

As reason for issuing the statement the 
chairman explains that the Board "is receiv- 
ing numerous inquiries in regard to the sale 
of ships. The many who are evincing in- 
terest in this matter are apparently moved 
by the thought that as the Board has so 
many vessels at its disposal, the price may 
recede." 

They are trying to introduce the Whitley 
plan of shop management in the Government 
workshops of New South Wales, but the 
workers are said to be bitterly opposed to 
the scheme. They are probably right at that, 
too ; for boss-made working rules are seldom 
for the good of the workers. 



THE SIMS BILL. 



The efficacy of the labor aphorism de- 
pends not so much upon its literal truth- 
fulness as upon the fact that the unbeliever 
must think to the extent of half a column 
or so in order to disprove it. 



Labor cannot make an improvement in its 
own conditions without breaking the friend- 
ship (?) of the employer who has assumed 
the whole right to attend to that sort of 
thing — in his own good time. 



The employer who is most strenuous in 
claiming the right to "run his own business" 
is frequently most insistent in the claim that 
it is the duty of his employes to attend to the 
advertising end thereof. 



The "crime of dying rich" is the crime 
of living to accumulate riches. It can not 
be atoned for by giving in alms to one, 
that which has been taken in greed from 
another. 



The unassimilativeness of the Chinese 
is generally cited as a point against the 
race, whereas, logically regarded, it is a 
point in its favor. We prefer to remain 
unassimilated. 



Unless backed by organization. Labor's de- 
mands for justice are about as effective as 
a poultice on a wooden leg. 



Support of It Earnestly Urged by Its 
Advocates. 



The "invisible government" which has swayed 
Congress since the Civil War was never so 
active in behalf of its projects as now. It is 
desperately at work at Washington trying to 
force the hand of Congress and consummate a 
steal of ten billions of dollars that have been 
ploughed into the fake property investment ac- 
count which the people are asked to legalize and 
ever afterward reward with a tax that directly 
adds to the cost of living. 

The only measure before Congress that stands 
between the people and the railroad-financial 
highwayman is the Sims bill, which was formu- 
lated and has the endorsement of the organized 
workers of this country. Every other bill pro- 
poses to permit this gigantic steal — the most 
colossal bit of freebooting in the annals of 
crime. 

The brotherhood bill is the only one that 
adequately meets the question of watered stock 
and the labor problem, and organized labor is 
the only force here in Washington, or in the 
nation, fighting on the people's side of this 
issue, that wields any power that the politicians 
fear. 

Seventeen separate and distinct plans of rail- 
way reorganization have been submitted to Con- 
gress. But it is noteworthy that neither the 
railway managers nor the Warfield committee 
of alleged shareholders has had the temerity to 
give publicity to their demands in the form of 
proposed legislation. 

True, the Warfield crowd has presented to a 
Congressional committee the proposed draft of 
legislation which it demands, but this bill was 
given under a pledge of confidence and the 
public has not heard a word from it. That is 
evidence that the railway-financial group are in a 
state of wholesome apprehension. They don't 
want the public to scrutinize too closely what 
they are trying to do. They want Congress to 
get into a wrangle, and then they will slip 
through their outrageous steal and the people, 
they hope, will be none the wiser until too 
late. 

The Cummins bill, with its un-American pro- 
vision against the only effective weapon that re- 
mains with the workers, is damned both by the 
workers and the managers. It does not give the 
latter all they want, but it gives them a great 
deal more than they are entitled to receive, or 
that they will receive if the people are aroused 
to the iniquity of their course. The Esch- 
Pomerene bill is an insipid bid for financial 
favor. It gives the managers somewhat more 
than Cummins is prepared to yield. But it is 
not enough for the managers. They want the 
whole of their outrageous demands. They want 
the people to legalize their fake ten billions of 
dollars of watered stock, and four billions addi- 
tional for depreciation during so-called Govern- 
ment control, and then they demand that for- 
ever after the people shall be taxed to pay_ a 
return upon this top-heavy inverted pyramid, 
built up of crime, manipulation and exploitation. 

And the managers will succeed, too, unless the 
organized railroad workers and other vigilant 
citizens prevent it. The Plumb Plan League is 
carrying the message of their venality to all 
sections of the country. Already there is a 
noteworthy veering of public opinion. The issue 
is not yet determined. The railroads may go 
back — but they will not go back to stay. That is 
the one certain thing in this controversy. The 
railroads may seize their booty, but they will 
never be able to get away with it. 

To contend otherwise would be to abandon 
faith in the intelligence and the patriotism of 
our citizenry. It would imply that we are fitted 
only to be slaves, to be the miserable, con- 
temptible creatures that Wall Street says the 
masses of Americans are. 



In various parts of Turkey the watch 
and the clock are extremely rare, but the 
natives have an exceedingly mgenious way 
of approximating the time, and some of 
them hit it with considerable accuracy. 
They locate two cardinal points of the 
compass and then folding their hands to- 
gether in such a manner that the fore- 
fingers point upward and in opposite direc- 
tions they observe the shadow cast. In 
the morning or evening at certain known 
hours one finger or the other will point 
directly at the sun. A comparison of the 
two shadows will determine the hours be- 
tween. Another system followed in Tur- 
key and some other countries of the Orient 
is to observe the eyes of a cat. Early in 
the morning and evening the pupils are 
round. At 9 and 3 o'clock they are oval 
and at noon they consist of a narrow slit. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 14, 1919. 

A synopsis of the minutes of the regular meet- 
ing held on the above date will be published in 
the next issue of the Journal. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, 

Secretary pro tem. 
Maritimp Hall Bldg., 59 Clay Street Tel. 
Kearny 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Oct. 6, 1919. 
No meeting. Shipping slow. 

J. ETCHELLS, Agent. 
Room 11, de Cosmos Block. 1424 Government 

Street. 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 6, 1919. 
Shipping good. 

W. G. MILLARD, Agent. 
58 Powell Street E. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. 
Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 6, 1919. 
Shipping medium. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2016 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 6, 1919. 
.Shipping quiet. 

W. S. BURNS. Agent pro tem. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 6, 1919. 
Shipping good; men scarce. 

ED ROSENBERG, Agent. 
P. O. Box 280. Tel. Main 5.57. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 6. 1919. 
Shipping fair; prospects medium. 

TACK ROSEN, Agent. 
mV? Third Street. Tel. Main 6013. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 6, 1919. 
Shipping fair; men scarce. 

HARRY OHLSEN. Aeent. 
128^4 Senulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 29, 1919. 
Shipping dull; prospects noor. 

F. A. PETERSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 9, 1919. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., D. E. Jones in the chair. Secretary 
reoorted shipping fair. Plenty of members 
ashore. 

EUGENE STETDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market Street. Phone Kearny 5955, 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 2, 1919. 
Shipping slow. Nominated officers for the en- 
suing term and delegates to the International 
Seamen's Union Convention. 

J. LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock. Room 203. P. O. Box 
214. Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 1, 1919. 
Shipping fair. Few members ashore; scarcity 
of cabin and galley men. Nominated officers 
for the en.suing term. 

TOE MACK. Agent. 
613 Beacon Street. Phone Sunset 336. P. O 
Box 54. 



DIED. 



Olof Hedlund, No. 2263, a native of Sweden, 
age 30. Died at Seaside. Ore., Oct. 1, 1919. 

John Kazapis. No. 14.52, a native of Greece, 
affc 22. Died at Palo Alto, Cal., Oct. 6, 1919. 



Two vessels originally designed as steamships 
niul contracted for bv Norwegian interests will 
he launched toward the close of the month from 
the Anderson shipyards at Houghton, Lake 
Washington. The oneration of these yards has 
been taken over by J. H. Price. The yards have 
bee:i idle for several months. 



8 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OUR WASHINGTON LETTER. 
(By Laurence Todd.) 



Senator Sterling of South Dakota took 
first prize, this week, among the members 
of the Senate Committee on Labor, which 
is investigating why the steel workers went 
on strike. He is a lawyer, of course, and 
his infinite ignorance of the human desire 
and demand for industrial justice can be 
taken for granted ; but not even Kaiser 
Gary of the U. S. Steel Corporation could 
outdo him in blindness when any evidence 
pointed to crimes committed by Gary and 
his associate slave-drivers. 

Take two of Sterling's questions as ex- 
amples. M. F. Tighe. international presi- 
dent of the Iron, Steel and Tin Workers' 
Union, had told how a local at ]\Iingo 
some ten years ago had asked him to with- 
draw their charter, as the Steel Corporation 
had closed down the plant until they should 
get rid of their union. Tighe refused, say- 
ing they ought to fight or surrender their 
charter. They abandoned it. 

"Don't you think that it was arbitrary on 
your part, and calculated to cause widespread 
suffering among these helpless people," de- 
manded Sterling, glaring at the witness, 
"for you to refuse to withdraw that char- 
ter?" 

"It was not arbitrary of me to decline to 
take away their constitutional right to main- 
tain a union," replied Tighe. 

That the Steel Corporation was criminal 
in this case never occurred to what Sterling 
uses as a mind. 

.\gain, when Tighe presented to the com- 
mittee a copy of an editorial from the Pitts- 
burgh Leader, published during the strike of 
1909, in which was reproduced an unsigned 
advertisement asking for "Men to W'ork in 
Open Shops," and describing work done 
onlv in the steel plants where scabs were 
then working, with the proviso in the ad- 
vertisement "Syrians, Poles and Roumanians 
preferred," Sterling immediately joined with 
Senator Phipps of Carnegie Steel in trying 
to discredit the theory that the Steel Cor- 
poration was responsible. 

"The only place these Syrians, Poles and 
Roumanians could be directed for these 
jobs was the plants of the Steel Corpora- 
tion," Tighe replied. "Every employment 
agency in .Mlegheny county was sending 
men, when they could, to the struck shops." 

Finally, Sterling crowned his efforts by 
heatedly objecting to the way that Tighe de- 
nounced an attempt by an armed band of 
thugs hired by the Steel Corporation crowd 
to drive four union organizers from a hotel 
in the next county to the scene of a steel 
strike at \'andergrift. The statesman main- 
tained that these "so-called" organizers 
"might have violated their instructions and 
incited strikers to interfere with the right of 
other men to break the strike," and that the 
public peace might thereby have been vio- 
lated, if the gunmen had not acted as they 
did. 

To review the tesimony of Gary or any 
other witness w'ould be futile, so bitter a 
farce has been tlie whole performance. Not 
one modern note has,, up to the time of 
writing this letter, been struck by any Sena- 
tor present. Kenyon, presiding, has an- 
nounced: "I agree with you. Judge Gary, 
as being for the open shop as against the 
closed shop." Walsh of Massachusetts has 
praised Gary's "industrial policy in the past. 



and the humanitarian work you have accom- 
plished." Nobody has said one word for the 
union shop as the sole safeguard of labor 
against the Kaiser Gary type of employer in 
modern industry. Not one of these Senators 
has seen the danger in their remaining 
stupidly indifferent to the wishes and the 
program of the organized wage workers of 
.America. Not all of these men arc hard- 
hearted ; some of them may be awakened 
when they visit the war zone in Pittsburgh 
and ]5ethlehem. If they don't, it will be a 
long day before the American Federation of 
Labor makes another big attempt to assist 
its struggle through an appeal to the intelli- 
gence and conscience of a Senate committee. 

r>ut the steel strike hearings don't de- 
serve the notice the\^ are getting, com- 
pared with the battle that goes forward 
here over the Plumb plan for natienaliza- 
tion and democratic control of the rail- 
roads. Little is being said openly, but 
big men in the world of labor are running 
in and out of W^ashington, holding con- 
ferences, counting up the strength of the 
alliance centered about the 1,. ^00,000 or- 
ganized railroaders and the ,^00,000 coal 
miners, and getting ready to see the Presi- 
dent's Industrial Conference avoid the 
whole problem. 

Because the scheme of the outsiders who 
framed up thisL October conference did not 
admit enough trade union representatives, 
the fourteen railroad organizations and the 
miners will take no part in it. There was 
at one time a hint that President Wilson 
would postpone the conference until this 
difficulty could be adjusted. Now that he 
is very ill, the men in charge of the con- 
ference say that it is going forward on 
schedule time. How it can take a stand 
for nationalization without hearing from 
the railroaders and miners is a puzzle; 
and any stand which it may take against 
their program will, under the circumstances, 
be worse than a joke. 

Predictions are generally unsafe, but in 
view of the manner in which the anti- 
labor press has tried to make it appear 
that President Gompers ahd the Executive 
Council of the A. F. of L. are opposed to 
nationalization of railroads on the Plumb 
plan, your correspondent predicts that Mr. 
Gompers himself will presently deny that 
position and wall come out for the Plumb 
plan. 

P>ehind the railroad problem is the coal 
problem. In their recent convention at 
Cleveland the United Mine ^^''orkers made 
short work of ahy delegate who tried to 
discredit nationalization of coal and all 
minerals. The resolution carried unani- 
mously. Within a few days their com- 
mittee will be in W^ashington to map out 
with the railroad employees their joint 
])lan of campaign. Already they have re- 
ceived a great many assurances of support 
from other crafts, in other basic industries. 
\\'hcther this is the road that the American 
Federation of Labor as a body will take, 
to get out of the w'ilderness of Gary-ism, 
of Cossack clubbings and of advertisements 
for "Syrians. Poles and Roumanians, to 
work in open shops," remains to be de- 
termined. No decision can be quickly 
made. The pressure for early considera- 
tion of the proposal, however, is bound to 
increase with every passing day of the 
hell-on-earth in the steel districts. 

Meantime, the labor delegates chosen by 
President Gomper.s for the industrial con- 



ference with delegates of organized capital, 
are coming together here to compare 
notes. Since they have a decided minority 
in the total member.ship of the conference, 
they don't expect to accomplish much. 
Possibly the conference will endorse the 
])rinci]:)le of profit-sharing, without any 
definite system for making it effective or 
important. Possibly some fine phrases 
about good citizenship will be passed. But 
it seems out of all reason to assume that 
any agreement on the right to the union 
shop, the right to democratic control, much 
less the right to nationalization of basic 
industries, will be possible at any stage. 

Gary is to take part in this conference 
as a spokesman of the public, just after 
he has sent out the message to all big 
em])loyers in America, by means of his 
testimony here, that "You cannot compro- 
mise with union labor, even to the extent 
of answering a letter from any union offi- 
cial, without danger that your plants will 
be unionized." 

J. T. Gaynor, president of the National 
-Association of Letter Carriers, after listen- 
ing to Gary, remarked that "It .sounds like 
our lUirlcson, all right!"' President Hyatt 
of the Federation of Postal Employees 
argued that Gary was more liberal than 
Burleson. 

^\'hcthcr the Federation of Postal Em- 
ployees will be able to present its grievance 
against the Postmaster-General before this 
October conference is not yet decided. 
Their officers will attempt it, but they are 
in much the same position as the Irish 
delegates who wanted to lay the cause of 
Irish freedom before the Paris peace coun- 
cil : they are considered to be noisy, im- 
pertinent trouble-makers, who ought to be 
kept out of the way while "industrial re- 
lations" in the extreme abstract are being 
debated. Indeed, the reputation of Thos. 
F. Flaherty, general secretary-treasurer of 
the Federation of Postal Employees, in 
administration circles is almost exactly 
like that of Frank P. Walsh in Paris 
peace council circles. 

Just when things are running smoothly, 
on paper, Flaherty shoves his head in at 
the door and says : "Well, now% when arc 
you going to give us public owmership 
and the right to organize in the postoffice 
industry? Cut out the rhetoric and deliver 
the goods on democracy!" 

They yell for a non-union policeman. 



.\ League of Order has been started in 
the Punjab, India. The young students 
are compelled to take an oath in the fol- 
lowing manner : 

"I, the undersigned, hereby pledge my 
honor as a gentleman and declare that I 
shall be loyal to the King Emperor (George 
V of England) and shall not associate my- 
self with any seditious propaganda or revo- 
lutionary movement and shall try my best 
to keep order wherever I am and promote 
loyalty by precept and example, and also 
contradict false and baseless rumors spread 
through ignorance or malice." 

The hearts of the students cannot be 
won by compulsion. It will simply fan 
the flame of revolutionary spirit which is 
manifested in every school and college in 
the country. 



A factory in Norway is said to obtain 
aluminum from Labrador stone, heretofore 
regarded as valueless. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



SYMPATHY FOR LABOR. 

(By W. B. Rubin.) 



Time and again, one hears the expression 
from good men and women : "I sympathize 
with Labor." It denotes a friendly interest. 
but what an odd expression, and, in its 
analysis, what a strange thought ! "Sympa- 
thize with Labor!" 

Sympathy should be directed to the weak. 
the unfortunate, the erring, but those who 
do things and do them well, need no sym- 
pathy. 

Compensation measures best any recogni- 
tion for services rendered. 

Sympathy savors of charity — extending 
by way of donation or gift. Charity is a 
mark of tolerance, and results in ' the satis- 
faction of one's personal sentiment, or the 
gratification and display of one's own de- 
sire for ostentation. Alms are given for 
personal satisfaction as much as for the 
alleviation of sufifering. 

If one works for another, why should the 
employer give his employes sympathy? The 
employe does not expect it, nor does he 
want it. Less of sympathy and more of 
compensation is what is desired and needed. 

Sympathy denotes a lack of proper adjust- 
ment. We may sympathize with a man who 
is getting only $5.00 when he is earning 
$6.00, but the man who is earning $6.00 
and getting $6.00 needs no sympathy. His 
is recognition. 

wSo let these philanthropists and the good 
men and women of Church and State, wel- 
fare workers and good citizens, who are 
trying to help the man who toils, and at the 
same time find their names and pictures in 
the press, get down to fundamentals and 
secure for Labor, not alms, not sympathv, 
but full wages, which is full recognition. 

Sympathy, get thee gone ! In sympathy, 
there is philanthropy; in recognition, there 
is justice. 

In philanthropy, there is palliation : in 
justice, there is truth. 

Why veil sympathy between the naked 
fact and the understanding? Look straight 
at the thing, and do justice. 

Justice is man's work — God's deed. 

It is time that we dealt with Labor in 
manly and Godlike fashion. 



TURTLE BESTS A BEAR. 



While bears are certainly dreaded antag- 
onists, they have been known to get the 
worst of it when out of their element. 
Curious and unequal combats occur when 
beasts of prey attack creatures under un- 
usual circumstances. The pursuer in such 
a case is likely to incur more risk than 
the pursued, a fact that was illustrated in 
a novel encounter in a harbor of Florida 
between a bear and a turtle. 

The crew of a schooner while ashore 
heard a strange rumpus and, pushing 
around a turn in the beach, saw a huge 
loggerhead turtle in deadly combat with a 
big black bear. 

From the men's position it seemed that 
the bear had sprung upon the turtle as it 
was retreating toward the water and had 
tried to overturn it. In some way the bear 
had stepped in front of the turtle, which, 
thrusting its head out, had quickly seized 
one of bruin's hind legs and held it. 

At this the bear roar«d loudly, pawed 
furiou.sly at the turtle's back and tried to 
force it over. The turtle resisted with all 
its strength and weight. He settled down 



close to the ground whenever the bear 
made an extra effort. Then, as the bear 
would relax its efforts, the turtle would 
suddenly start up and endeavor to get 
nearer to the water, keeping his firm hold 
on the bear's leg all the while. 

Finally, by a sudden push and a power- 
ful muscular effort of his head and paws, 
bruin managed to get the turtle half set, 
one side being raised a foot or two. Pur- 
suing his advantage, he seized one of the 
turtle's big flippers in his jaws, and the 
snap that followed showed that the bear 
felt that things were coming his way. 

He continued to chew the flipper and en- 
deavor to overthrow , the turtle. But his 
antagonist worked around and finally got 
in a stroke with its sharp claw that badly 
ripped the bear's underside. This infuri- 
ated the bear to such an extent that he let 
go his grip on the flipper and, reaching his 
head down, tried to reach and free his hind 
leg. Herein he committed a terrible tact- 
ical error and the enraged loggerhead 
quickly improved the opportunity thus af- 
forded him. 

As the bear's nose came within reach 
the turtle let go the hind leg and, quick 
as a flash, fastened his iron grip upon the 
bear's jaw. The bear was taken by sur- 
prise and roared lustily with pain and rage. 
The turtle pushed on and dragged his un- 
willing captive along. The bear saw his 
danger and felt it, too, for they were so 
near the water's edge that the waves were 
splashing on them. 

The bear continued to struggle fero- 
ciously, but his strength soon began to 
fail, for the turtle dragged him deeper and 
deeper. Fighting with his head half the 
time under water so exhausted the bear 
that presently he began to gurgle. That 
moment was fatal. The loggerhead marched 
off into the sea with his enemy and the 
last seen of the bear was the feeble kicking 
of his hind legs. Next day his body was 
washed ashore, cut into a dozen pieces. — 
New York Herald. 



The city of Alexandria, Egypt, has al- 
lowed the celebrated engineer, Mr. Mack- 
lin, to go to Jerusalem at the request of 
the authorities there to inaugurate certain 
important sanitary reforms. Not only is 
Ihe Holy City to have the improvements, 
but others which will be bestowed upon 
the whole of Palestine. A railway now 
extends from the Valley of the Nile to 
Palestine, over which daily are brought 
fresh A^egetables and fruit to the Egyptian 
cities. M'hich find a ready market and are 
a sure source of Income to the people, who 
have been living under the shadow of death 
since the war began. The sea route is also 
open to trade, causing an exchange of com- 
modities between the two countries via the 
Suez Canal. But this is not all the English 
army of occupation is doing. It is setting 
out forests in the wastes, planting trees in 
the towns of Palestine, in her streets, on 
her hills and high places, in her valleys 
<ind highways, that the moisture may be 
conserved and the land become again a 
garden, not of the gods, but God's garden. 
It is proposed to plant eucalyptus trees in 
the streets of Jerusalem to purify the air, 
and other shade trees like those in England 
and America. Another blessing Engli.sh 
thought is giving that parched land is the 
building of reservoirs on the heights about 
the Holy City, from which the surrounding 
country may be watered during the dry 
season. . 



Of all the cities of Central Asia, Mara- 
kanda, as the Greeks called Samarkand, 
in Turkestan, has been the most important 
at practically all times. Upon this city and 
Bokhara for ages the covetous eyes of the 
various khans, khanans, or amirs, have 
been focused, and as the waves of inva- 
sion came from east or west, north or 
south, these two cities suffered partial or 
total destruction. Lender Timour, Samar- 
kand became the capital of his vast em- 
p\re, and was the center of Asia and the 
Mohammedan world. This ruler was re- 
sponsible for most of its monuments, which 
have survived to the present day, and 
which may be justly acclaimed as the mas- 
terpieces of Islam. To Samarkand he sent 
architects, scientists, and artisans from con- 
quered cities, and his army, when not en- 
gaged in war, he used for building. Con- 
ditions in Bokhara and Samarkand, once 
the greatest slave markets of Asia, where 
at times a slave could be bought for about 
2S cents, the same price as that of a meas- 
ure of grain, so improved under Russian 
control that these cities are as safe to visit 
and inhabit as were Moscow or Petrograd 
before the war. 



An effort is being made in Italy to pro- 
duce a great atlas of the world, which will 
make Italians independent of the German 
atlases of Sticler, Anfrce, Dcbes, and 
others. 

Labor's Economic Platform 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor dis- 
putes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight 
hours per day on all Federal, State or municipal 
work, and not less than the prevailing per diem 
wage rate of the class of employment in the 
vicinity where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man-suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or 
compartments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Gov- 
ernment, with such regulations and restrictions 
as will protect it from manipulation by the 
banking interests for their own private gain. 



10 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 
(Continued from Pag* 3.) 



ment of his expenditures, furnished the 
committee for its inspection : 

Rent, $20; groceries, $60; gas, $5; coal 
and wood, $6; insurance, $5; laundry, $8; 
milk, $5 ; uniform, $8 ; shoes for family, $8 ; 
papers, $2; church and charity, $2; clothing 
for family, $10; dentist and doctors, $3; 
theaters, $4; carfare, $3; lunches, $6. He 
explained that his average for luncheon was 
20 cents, and when asked by members of 
the committee where he could get a lunch for 
20 cents, he said he bought it in a deli- 
catessen store, carried it out in a bag and 
ate it on the sidewalk. 



Wage Disparity Shown. 

I\Ien working in hotels and restaurants 
far outnumber women in occupations usually 
regarded as woman's work. This is shown 
in the preliminary report on wages paid 
hotel and restaurant employes issued by the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics in September 
labor review. 

Men predominate in the industry, 24,000 
out of the 40,000 employes included being 
men and only 16,000 women. Of the 3800 
cookS; only 350, or 9 per cent., are women ; 
of the 4200 dishwashers, 1700, or 40 per 
cent., are women ; of the kitchen help, only 
1100 out of 30C>0, or 37 per cent., are 
women. 

There is a striking contrast between the 
wages paid these men and women in the 
same occupation. Thus 24 men cooks are 
paid $10 a day, while only one woman 
receives as much as $6 a day. Waiters, 
maids, bellmen and baggage porters are 
expected to supplement their wages by tips. 
Averages for each city of the value of 
such tips show that maids receive an average 
of 11 cents to 88 cents a day, while bell- 
men and waiters receive from $1.27 to 
$3.78 and from $1.16 to $3.67, respectively. 



Employers Whimper. 

Steel employers have only themselves to 
blame if their foreign-born workers are 
now on strike, declared President Gompers 
before the Senate Committee on Education 
and Labor, which is investigating the steel 
strike. 

"It has been said that most of the men 
taking part in this strike are of foreign 
birth and are not naturalized citizens," said 
President Gompers. "That may be, and no 
doubt is, true. The largest proportion of 
the steel corporation's employes are of 
foreign birth, but these men were brought 
here by the companies. 

"For years there was a systematic effort 
to bring in these workers from Europe. 
There was a systematic effort to eliminate 
Americans. They have a harvest to reap 
now." 

The trade union executive declared that 
the right of the employes to have some 
voice in determining the conditions under 
which they work is the paramount issue in 
the steel strike. Asked to define the issues 
in the controversy, President Gompers said: 

"The right to be heaj'd is what the steel 
workers are asking above all else — the right 
to speak with their employers through their 
own representatives, to have some voice in 
determining conditions under which they 
work. 

"The workers' right of association has 



been denied — denied with all the steel cor- 
poration's power and influence — denied by 
brutal and unwarrantable means." 



Police Defended. 

Boston police ofiicials and Governor Cool- 
idge are scored in a long statement on the 
recent policemen's strike by attorneys for 
the Policemen's union. Attention is called 
to the increase of $300 a year to policemen 
since the strike. 

"The American Federation of Labor must 
be given credit for bringing bad conditions 
to light," the statement declares, in point- 
ing out that vile working and living condi- 
tions, outrageous hours and low pay were 
brought to public attention. "The American 
Federation of Labor was the last resort," 
says the statement, which recounts the nu- 
merous attempts to secure a redress of 
grievances. 

It is shown that before the strike wages 
ranged from $1100 the first year to $1600 
after the sixth year. Night men worked 
72 hours weekly for this wage, with ten 
hours' extra duty weekly through early re- 
port at the station house. There was no 
pay for overtime and extra duty was re- 
quired on election day, and for parades, 
large gatherings and on holidays. 

Bad living conditions are indicated in the 
use of one bed by two, three and four men, 
each twenty-four hours, in station houses 
that are old, unsanitary and in some cases 
vermin infested and without bath or toilet 
facilities. 

Governor Coolidge is charged with evading 
an attempt to settle the strike, and now that 
he is showered with praise after the strike 
has ended the statement makes this sarcas- 
tic reference to the State executive : 

"He faced a bombardment of praise and 
flattery as bravely as did some of the police 
officers when they faced the shell and gas of 
Germans a few months ago in the service of 
their country." 



Enacts Anti-Strike Law. 

The Alabama Legislature has rewarded 
workers of that State who fought in the 
great war for liberty and democracy by pass- 
ing a law against strikes. A penalty of $1000 
is provided. Opponents of the law declare 
that if it is enforced to the letter it will 
be impossible for any group of Alabama 
workers to suspend work. Section two of 
the bill is as follows : 

"Any person, firm or corporation, who 
enters into any agreement, combination or 
understanding with another or others that 
th^ party so agreeing shall not engage in 
or aid in carrying on public service, or 
who so agrees or conspires with others to 
prevent, retard or impede third persons 
from engaging in or working at any public 
service, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor." 



Want Japs Barred. 

The so-called "gentlemen's agreement" be- 
tween the United States and Japan is being 
violated by the latter country, declared V. 
S. McClatchy of Sacramento, Gal., and 
Miller Freeman of Seattle before the House 
Immigration Committee. The agreement 
provides that no Japanese laborers shall be 
admitted to this country. The witnesses 
urged adoption of a policy of absolute 
exclusion by the United States and the de- 
portation of Asiatics now in this country. 
The Sacramento witness declared that the 



situation on the Pacific Coast was an ex- 
ample of what would happen elsewhere and 
would finally result "in the United States 
being made a Japanese province." 

"The question is purely an economic one, 
not a racial one," said Mr. McClatchy, who 
assailed the making of the gentlemen's agree- 
ment as "a serious blimder." 

"The Japanese government is issuing 
passports under any head except labor," 
asserted Mr. Freeman. "The only way of 
solving the problem is by legislation ; it 
cannot be solved by administration of exist- 
ing laws." 

Mr. McClatchy said a policy of absolute 
exclusion of the Japanese because of their 
economic standards would be but practicing 
a policy enforced by the Japanese in their 
country against the Chinese and Koreans. 
The first importation of Chinese laborers 
into Japan occurred last December, he said, 
and resulted in the government compelling 
the industrial concern bringing them to the 
island to return them in January, at an 
expenditure of $25,000 of the concern's 
funds. 



Textile Workers Gain. 

The LTnited Textile Workers have reached 
the 100,000 mark, writes John Golden, 
president of that organizaton, to A. F. of 
L. Secretary Frank Morrison. 

In thanking the American Federation of 
Labor for its aid in this work. President 
Golden says the eight-hour day is established 
in the northern part of the country and 
that hours in the South are being reduced 
from 62 and 60 hours a week to the forty- 
eight-hour basis. The whole of South Caro- 
lina has been placed on a fifty-five-hour 
basis ; two-thirds of North Carolina and 
over one-half of Georgia. 

"Space will not permit a record of the 
splendid increase in wages secured for the 
textile workers throughout the whole of the 
country," he says. "The low, miserable 
wage scales, once so manifest in the textile 
industry, have been completely eliminated. 
Textile workers to-day in practically every 
branch of the industry are receiving a real 
living American wage, principally through 
the economic force wielded by the United 
Texitle Workers of America, and it is our 
firm intention to retain that standard 
achieved from now on." 

Tlie textile workers' executive says that 
the slogan of that organization is "Now For 
the Next Hundred Thousand." 



Working Women's Survey. 

Mary Ander.son, chief of the women's 
bureau of the Department of Labor, has 
sent out a call to State departments for aid 
in making a survey of the number of em- 
ployed women in the United States who arc 
supporting dependents and the average week- 
ly salary of such women. 

Her letter to the State Industrial Com- 
missioners shows that a recent survey in 
one State brought out the fact that 3779 
women were supporting 7206 children under 
the age of 16 years. About 71 per cent, of 
51,361 wage-earning women were receiving 
less than $14 per week. 



A caterpillar in the course of a month 
will devour 6,000 times its own weight in 
food. It will take a man three months 
before he eats an amount of food equal 
to his own weight. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



SHIP AHOY, CAPTAIN KIDD! 



It is time for the ghosts of Captain Kidd, 
Blackbeard and old John Morgan to get 
busy and guard their hidden plunder. They 
are digging — or dipping — up centuries-old 
Spanish treasure, not from the sands of 
Florida, the islands of the Carolinas or the 
Antilles, but from the ocean bed off the 
coast of Scotland. But whether the one 
place or the other, when the modern Argo- 
naut goes after buried or sunken treasure 
with modern scientific appliances, it is time 
for all hidden gold and its ghostly guards 
to beware. Spanish "pieces of eight," for 
the possession of which many a gallant 
galleon was burned and its crew made to 
walk the plank, have been found in an 
ancient galleon raised from the sea. The 
piece of eight was the legitimate forebear 
of our present silver dollar, the "dollar of 
our daddies." When Congress determined 
the size and contents of the silver dollar 
it used as its model the Spanish "milled 
dollar" of eight shillings, but, fortunately, 
made it a "piece of ten" instead of eight 
by adopting the decimal system and giving 
us dimes instead of shillings. Yet, for 
nearly a century thereafter, many of our 
people, especially in the northern and New 
England States, continued to figure ac- 
counts in shillings, but to collect them in 
dimes. What visions of those bold buc- 
caneers who "sailed the, Spanish main" 
resurrection of the treasure of this sunken 
galleon conjures up, of not only the 
pirates who have been mentioned, but the 
almost equally piratical Sir Francis Drake, 
and those other English and Dutch ad- 
venturers who preyed upon shipping in 
both the Atlantic and Pacific, off the coast 
of Panama and in the seas and passages 
of the West Indies. It is said of one of 
these English royally indorsed pirates that 
his ship departed with cotton sails and re- 
turned to England with sails of silk. — 
Philadelphia Public Ledger. 



ELEPHANTS AS SWIMMERS. 



Elephants do their best work in floating 
streams, working the timber with the cur- 
rent, releasing logs from jams and rolling 
the stranded logs back into the water. 
The elephant drivers have a special "ele- 
phant" language which the animals under- 
stand — a special elephant vocabulary with 
such terms as "Push sideways," "Roll," 
"Pull out," "Stop," "Lift your chains." It 
is very interesting and exciting to watch 
the elephants at work in high water (ac- 
cording to a writer in "Asia"). They are 
magnificent swimmers. When they swim 
from bank to bank, herding the logs that 
require their special attention, you see 
nothing of them except the tips of their 
trunks, through which they breathe, and 
the mahouts, or drivers, who are generally 
in water up to their waists. If a big stack 
or jam breaks suddenly where elephants 
are working, they know the danger of be- 
ing overtaken. They trumpet and clear 
off to either bank, or swim downstream as 
fast as they can go. I once saw an ele- 
phant working at the head of a jam slip 
off a bank into deep water and get swept 
under the stack. We all believed that he 
was a goner, but every now and then we 
were surprised to see his trunk come up 
through the logs, suck in a long breath, 
and disappear. The trunk would reappear 



each time further downstream. He finally 
emerged at the foot of the jam, very much 
blown, but otherwise none the worse for 
his accident. But he would not go near a 
pile of timber in high water for a year 
afterwards. This particular work is called 
"hounding." 



WHEN LAWYERS STRUCK. 



Some years ago the barristers practicing 
in Sierra Leone were so dissatisfied with 
the judge who was acting as substitute 
for the chief justice while the latter was 
on leave that they unanimously elected to 
give up pleading before him. Legal busi- 
ness in the colony was therefore at a 
standstill until the chief justice returned. 

France, too, affords an instance of a 
legal strike. One of the judges at St. 
Amand accused his colleagues of deliber- 
ately promoting disputes in order to fill 
their pockets with fees. Thereupon all the 
lawyers in court departed in a body, de- 
claring that they would not return until 
this insulting statement had been with- 
drawn. Eventually the judge apologized, 
and the lawyers resumed practice. 



PUTTING SNAILS TO WORK. 



The famous French airman, Georges 
Dombrival, has utilized the well known in- 
stinct which scientists have long observed 
is possessed by snails. For some unknown 
reason a snail, when placed on an inclined 
plane, crawls towards the highest part. 
When M. Dombrivals was informed of 
this he placed on the upper plane of his 
Maurice-Farman machine 88 pounds of 
snails, two-thirds of which were the large, 
slow snails of Bourgogne, beloved by epi- 
cures, the remainder a smaller and more 
agile variety. After rising to about 1,500 
feet he was able to take his hands off the 
controls for the rest of his two hours' 
flight. The snails moved In a mass to- 
wards the upper part and re-established the 
equilibrium whenever the machine dipped, 
either laterally or longitudinally, thus 
keeping the aeroplane in perfect line of 
flight. 



At a certain naval port the other day, 
when a low tide and an obstinate wind 
made It difficult for vessels to secure to the 
pier, a submarine was endeavoring to tie 
up. Three times did the patient comman- 
der manoeuvre his craft in fairly close, but 
each time the wind caught his bows and 
blew the boat away. On deck stood a 
young sailor who had made no fewer than 
five attempts to heave a line on to the pier, 
but on each occasion the rope fell into the 
water halfway. Once more the boat neared 
the pier, and the "skipper" felt sure the 
man would manage it this time, but, alas ! 
it hit the wall about five feet too low. 
This was too much for him, and, leaning 
over the bridge-screen, he shouted : "Shove 
the bally thing in your teeth and swim 
across before you wear it out." 



Last year the exports passing out of 
New York harbor had a greater valuation 
than the combined exports of Asia, Africa 
and Australia. 



The Danube flows through countries in 
which 52 languages and dialects are 
spoken. It is 2,000 miles in length. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

(Continued from Pa«e S.) 
LAKE DISTRICT— (Continued). 

MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS, WATERTENDERS 

AND COAL PASSERS' UNION OF THE 

GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone, Seneca 48. 

THOS. CONTVAY, Secretary. 

ED HICKS, Treasurer. 

Branches: 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 74 Bridge Street 

Phone, 428-W. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 332 Banks Avenue 

Phone, Broad 131. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 9214 Harbor Avenue 

Phone, S. C. 1599. 

TOLEDO, Ohio 618 Front Street 

Phone, Bell Navarre 1823. 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1012 Superior Avenue 

Phone, Main 866. 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 162 Reed Street 

Phone, South 598. 

DETROIT, Michigan 44 Shelby Street 

Phone, Cadillac 543. 

CHICAGO, 111 332 N. Michigan Ave. 

Phone, Central 8460. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 122% Main Street 

Phone, 890 P. J. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION 

Headquarters: 

Buffalo, N. Y., 35 West Eagle Street 

Telephone Seneca 896. 

J. M. SECORD, Secretary. 

Branches: 

CHICAGO, 111 406 N. Clark Street 

CLEVELAND, Ohio 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE. Wis 162 Reed Street 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, Ohio 85 Bridge Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, HI 9214 Harbor Avenue 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, Ohio 992 Day Street 

TOLEDO, Ohio 618 Front Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 
Marine Hospitals: 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

Relief Stations: 
Ashland, Wis. Ogdensburg, N. T. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. Oswego, N. Y 

Buffalo, N. Y. Port Huron, Mich. 

Duluth, Minn, Manitowoc, Wis. 

Escanaba, Mich. Marquette, Mich. 

Grand Haven. Mich. Milwaukee, Wis. 

Green Bay, Wis. Saginaw, Mich. 

Houghton, Mich. Sandusky, O. 

Ludington, Mich. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Manistee, Mich. Sheboygan, Wis. 

Erie, Pa. Superior, Wis. 

Menominee, Mich. Toledo, O. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 59 Clay Street 

Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C 1424 Government Street 

VANCOUVER, B. C P. O. Box 1366 

TACOMA, Wash 2016 North 30th Street 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 65 

ABERDEEN, Wash P. O. Box 28* 

PORTLAND, Ore 88% 3rd Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box 67 

HONOLULU, H. T P. O. Box 314 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 68 Commercial Street 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 64 Pike St. Viaduct, P. O. Box 876 

PORTLAND, Ore 242 Flanders Street 

SAN PEDRO, Cal. ..613 Beacon Street, P. O. Box 57i 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 

OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 42 Market Street 

Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash Room 203, Grand Trunk Dock 

P. O. Box 214 
SAN PEDRO, Cal P. O. Box hi 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

Agencies: 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street, P. O. Box 42 

ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 13« 



DEEP SEA FISHERMEN'S UNION OF THE 

PACIFIC. 

Headquarters. 

SEATTLE, Wash 84 Seneca Street 

Branches: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal 49 Clay Street 

VANCOUVER (B. C), Canada 437 Gore Avenue 

PRINCE RUPERT (B. C), Canada P. O. Box 98« 

KETCHIKAN, Alaska P. O. Box 201 

PETERSBURG Alasks 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
ASTORIA, Ore P. O. Box 111 



FERRYBOATMEN'S UNION. 

SAN FRANCISCO Cal 9 Mission Street 

Phone Suiter 2205 



MARINE FIREMEN'S AND OILERS' UNION OF 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

VANCOUVER, B. C S29 Columbia Avenue 

VTCTORTA, B. C 1424 Government Street 



B. C. COAST STEWARDS. 
VANCOUVER. B. C , W Rlo)i«rda ltre«t 



12 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




The New York District Council 
of the Brotherhood of Painters, 
Decorators and Paperhangers has 
won its fight for the S-day week 
and $1 an hour. When a settlement 
was reached with about fifty con- 
tractors composing the United Con- 
tractors' Association the end had 
come. The representatives of the 
District Council refused to sign any 
agreement with the Association of 
Master Painters, as they chose to 
term themselves. The painters al- 
leged that that body violated all its 
agreements with the district and will 
be given no recognition hereafter. 

That gas attacks, so vigorously 
condemned by the Allies when prac- 
tised by the Germans, are to be one 
of the methods of suppressing the 
working class in the future, is the 
prediction of Col. Roy Bacon, direct- 
or of the Mellon Institute. In an 
address before the Pittsburgh Cham- 
ber of Commerce recently he asserted 
that "tear gas in the future will be 
used in dispersing mobs, instead of 
clubs and revolvers. One drop of 
the gas fluid will be sufficient to kill 
from twenty to thirty persons." Col. 
Bacon recently returned from France, 
where he had been perfecting various 
gases for the United States Govern- 
ment to be used against the German 
army. 

The joint conference held at At- 
lantic City between representatives 
of the National Brotherhood of 
Operative Potters and the United 
Potters' Association terminated in 
an increase of 5 per cent, to all 
branches of the general ware and 
china trades. It is understood that 
the increase applies on the present 
surplusage. The new agreement 
runs for a period of two years. A 
proviso was inserted that permits 
the reopening of the agreement for 
the presentation of further claims 
for an increase if the cost of living 
continues to increase. 

Union labor has every right to 
be proud of the patriotic record 
made by the United Mine Workers 
of America throughout the last three 
years. The report of Secretary- 
Treasurer William Green, made to 
the national convention of the mine 
workers, showed that 53,812 members 
had served in the American forces 
during the war, of whom 3,333 had 
laid down their lives. The inter- 
national and local unions, together, 
purchased more than $9,800,000 in 
war savings stamps and liberty 
bonds, and the miners are credited 
with having increased coal produc- 
tion from 590,000,000 tons, in 1916, 
to 684,000,000 tons last year. 

Even in the lethargic South labor 
organization is advancing by leaps 
and bounds, and the workers are 
making their united power felt more 
and more. A recent indication of 
this is the fact that the tailors of 
Augusta, Ga., have won out in their 
fight with the merchant tailors. By 
the terms of the settlement, a most 
far-reaching and fundamental change 
is made in the terms of employment, 
in that the present mode of piece 
work is converted into the weekly 
wage system. Also, the present ob- 
jectionable sweatshop method of 
working at home is abolished and 
the journeymen tailors are placed 
upon the same footing as all other 
wage-earners. 



Office Phone Elliott 1194 



EaUblished 189» 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-Date Methods In Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy 

COMPASSES ADJUSTEIJ 

712-13-14 SEABOARD BLDG. FOURTH and PIKE STREETS 

SEATTLE, WASH. 







Ask for this Label 
on Beer 



INT'L UNION OF 
UNITED BREWERY and 
SOFT DRINK WORKERS 

OF AMERICA 
Asks you to write and speak to your 



iimoii / y s atHi \ sofi 



Ask for this Label 
on Soft Drinks 



STATE ASSEMBLYMEN AND STATE SENATORS 
WORK i\ND VOTE 

Against the Ratification of the National Prohibition Amendment 
rtp >'* to the Constitution 



Seattle, Wash-, Letter List, i Leskenen, f. 



L, iiuor a. rule auopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addreesed In care of 
the aallors' Union AKfniy at Seattle can 
not De held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery, if members are unable 
lo call or nave iheir mall lorwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Asrent to hold man untii arrlveu 
Aa.se, Olaf Ander-son, Soxtes 

Abrahamson, HelftanAndersson, Gustav 
Abolin, K. Andersen Alf. -1638 

Abrahamson. John Anderson, Albert 
Anderson John (6) Andersen, Olaf -2099 
Adams, A. D. Andersen, Herman 

Anderson Adolf (4) Anderson, John N. 
Anderson Harry (2) Anderson, Julius 
Anderson, Chris Andewig, H. 
Anderson, John -ISOOAntonsen, Martln(3) 
Andresen, JorRcn Akerstrom, O. R. 

Antonsen, Anton G. 

Alquist, Crls 

Alexis, H. 

Aspengreen, E. 



I Anderson, Albert 
' H. (2) 

Anderson, Charles 

Andersson W. (2) 

Anderson Rasmus 

Bang, Oskar 

Backlund, K. 
i Backman, Axel 
I H.-iokstron). F. 

Belmont. Joe 

Berg, Wm. 

Beversdorf, E. 



Bjorkstrom, A. 
Bloomgren, Adolf 
Bodie, Wm. 
Boyle, James E. 
Bolstad, Alf. 
Borgan, Arne 
Brown, Calvin 



Bertleson, Bertie J. Bratson, Jos 
Bcrgkvest, Axel Bruce, Albert 

Berentsen, A. M. 
Berkland, Hans J 
Bibbs, Golden S. 
Bjorseth, K. 



H. 



Campbell, John 
Camino, C. C. 
Carl.son, Herbert 
Carlsen, Gust. 
Carlin, Carl A. 
Cartveit, C. C. 
Carlson, Gus. 
Carlson, Oscar 



Brun, Dick 
Burgiss, J. W. 
Bund, Nils 
Burggraf, Albert 
Carlson, C. A. 
Carlson, Chas. H. 
Carlson, Gunner 
Carstensen, Carsten 
Casperson, Carl 
Carruthers, M. 
Clausen, Christ. 
454 Corron, George R. 



Carlson, John -1586 Cochrane, Robt. 
Carlson. Ingwald Cortes, P. 



Dahl, Ole 

Davies, Chester C 

Davies, E. R. 

Delaney, John 
jDehler, J. 
I Dekker, D. 

Enoksen, A. 

Eliassen, H. O. 

BIstad, John 

Klzp. Cnrl 

Ellis, J. 

Elling. Alfred 

Forevaag, C. 
I Fair, Phaltl 

Feedge J. A. 
' Ferguson, Robt. 
JFelsch, C. 

Flatten. James Q 
I Flemmlng, M. 
I Gabrielsen, P. 

Camber, J. J. 
[Gerson, Chas. 
|Gibler, Karl 
I Hanson, Olaf 
I Hanson, Andrew 
.Hanspn, John P. 
'Hanson, Josef 

Hanson, Peter 
I Hanson, G. E. 

Hanson, John 

Halley, Wm. 

Tlaraldson. Johan 

Halseth, Ed. 
Ilnglebretsen, Olaf 

Iverson, Andrew 
iJaoobson, Johan 

Janson. E. A. 
'Jansen, Emll 
; Jensen, Nils 

Jensen, Henry 

Jensen, Hans 

Johnson, A. W. 

Johansen, Ed. 

.lohnsen, Jacob 

.lohansen, J. 

Johnson, Peter M. 



Ditmanson, 
Dreyer, J. 
Dunwoody. George 
Douglas, W. 
Dunn, W. G. 
Dutton, H. 
Elisen, Sam 
Evsner, Ingvar 
Erikson, Erik 
Erikson, Otto 
Erickson, K. 
Erickson, J. R. 
Fox, Andrew 
Folks, H. 
Fuve, A. M. 
Fuidge, E. W. 
Franson, O. 
Fredrecksen, F. 

Groth, Karl 
Grunbock, John 
Gusjoos, O. 
Gustafsson, O. 
Hasselborg, Gus. 
Henrekson, E. 
Hendreckson, H. 
Hoik, Geo. 
Holmquist, Einor 
Holland, J. 
Hill, F. 
Hilliard, 
Hunter, 



R. 
H. 



Isakson, Karl 
Iverson, Ole 
Johnson, E. 
Johnson. Peter -231.'^ 
.lohnsen, A. 
Johanson, Jakob 
Johnson, G. 
Johnstone, Walter 
Johansen, Karl 
.Tohnsen, John 
Johnsen, Adler -256"' 
.Tnhanssen. Erik 
.Tohnson. P. 



Johansen. Karl -2127 



Karlstrand, G. 

Kastl. H. 
I Karlson, K. 

Karlsen, O. 

Korsama, N. 
, Kalllo, F. 

Karlsen, E. 
iKempson. M. 

T^arsen, Hjalmer 



J. 



Segurd 

G. 

F. 



T-arsen 
T,arsen 
T-ampl, 
T^arsen, Alex 
Larsen, C. A 
Larson, 
T-arson. 
Lee, C. 



E. G. 
Fred 



Klnes. J. H. 
Knudson, A. ; 
Koppen, O. 
Kother. H. 
Koppen, B. 
Kristlansen, J. 
Karhanan. E. 
Kutin, John 
Ijeeuwen, A. 1 
Lul, T. 
I.ppravacg. H. 
T.Idston, C. 
T-/)rgeman, F. 
Lund. Wm. 
Luetter, T. 
Lundberg, E. 
Lundgren, C. 



Mortensen, K. A. 
Mathesen, Segurd 
Mortensen, H. 
Martindale, John 
Mardinsen, C. 
Malmqvist, C. 
Manus, Johanus 
Mordison, A. 
Malone, B. 
Mercer, II. 
Meckelson, J. 
Molby, V. 
Meloen, Harry 
Melder, Albert 
Meskolsson, Erik 
Mikkelsen, K. -16 
Nelson, Emil 
Nelson, Carl 
Nelson, A. C. 
Nelson, A. W. 
Nelson, John 
Nelson, Robert 
Olsen, Chris -137 
Olsen, Nlc 
Olsen, Albert 
Olson, Adolph 
Olsen, Ferdinand 
Olnes, Laurits 
Olsen, Arne 
Olsen, Robert 
Pakkl, Emil 
Paaso, A. 
Paterson, P. 
Paklesen, K. 
Permin, Jens C. 
Pederson, E. P. 
Petterson, Adolf 
Pederson, Carl 
Pestoft, S. 
Peterson, Karl E. 
Rasmussen, Christ 
Rantenen, H. 
Reenhold, Gustov 
Rohenson, W. N. 
Rosenberg, Adolf 
Sandberg, Otto 
Sandel, F. S. 
Sather, H. 
Sassi, W. 
Schmidt, W. 
Schuur, H. 
Seppala, Emll 
Seyfried, M. 
Shoberg, J. 
Simmons, John 
Smith, Emil 
Sodwick, Ben 
Sorenson, H. 
Solberg, Olaf 
Taice, John J. 
Tapper, A. E. 
Tessabia, B. 
Thor.sen, Herman 
Thammeson, Ole 
Thorsen, Hans 
Thorsen, Victor 
Ilhlnes, F. 
Vesgood, Jens 
Ward, D. 
Waggoner, Sam 
Walters, Al 
Walters, Ted 
Watt, .lohn B. 
Weld, L. A. 
West, J. N. 
Winter, Theodore 



Ludersson, W. -1L'4C 

Miller, Frank 

Miller, A. M. 

Morrison, J. D. 

Morken, M. L. 

Moore, J. 

Morrison, Wm. 

Morgan, Wm. 

Moor, Thos. 

Moen, Robt. 

MacKay, James 

McGuire, T. 

McKenzie, D. J. 

McGuire, J. 

MacKay, Thos. 

McGregor, J. 
2aMcCoy, James 

Nellsen, Axel 

Noren, B. 

Nord, C. W. 

Nilsen, Andreas 

Nilsen, Hans L. 

Nlmen, August 
9 Olsen, Hans 

Olsson, C. 

Olsen, Carl 

Olson, John 

Otterspear, Wm. 

Overland, Oskar 

O'Keefe, T. F. 

Pearson, Gustov 
Pederson, John 
Pettersen, Bjorne 
Pedersen, Karl 
Pelta, Henry 
Peterson, Ole 
Plantiko, W. 
Powell, H. 
Porter, A. 
Punls, A. 
Rosenthal, W. 
Rohman, G. 
Rosenblad, Albln 
Rund, Nils 

Sorenson, Tom 
Sorger, E. 
Strand, Alfred 
Stentz, P. 
Steftensen, S. 
St. Clair, Thomas 
Stratton, M. 
Suomlnen, F. 
Sundby, Alfred 
Sverdrup, Thorwald 
Svendson, John A. 
Swanson, Wm. 
Syverson, Oskar 

Thorn. Arvld 
Tonneson, Anton 
Tomquist, Henry 
Troverson, Louis 
Tyrrell, J. 
Tuorllla, J. 



Voldby, P. 

Wil.>!on, Gus 
Wil.son, C. 
WIthherg, Alf 
Williams, Lloyd 
Wllhelmsen, Martin 
Wirta, Geo. 
Wullum, J. 



Aberdeen, Wash , Letter List 



.\ii(lcr'S(in. .John 
Andersen, Olaf 
-Andfrson, .\. P. 
Anderson. Andrew 
Barrot. G. 
Rrandt. Arv. 
Burmelster. T. 
Brun, Mattia 
Rrnnt. Max 
Rrandt. H. 
Carlson. Osc. 
Christenscn. I.,ouls 
Cormack, W. C. 
Dnuglas. .1. 
Fischer, Chas. A. 
Gomos. M. G. 
Halverson, Halvor 
Huljner, H. 
Hansen, Johan 
Harko, Anton 
TIafverman, W. 
Harke, S. 
Henricksson, J. L. 

M. 
Hedrick, Jack 
Tansson, John 
Janssoi;, .T. A. 
■Icnsen, Pote 
Jensen, Hans 
Jensen, Joe 
Johanssen, John F. 
.lohannessen. Alf. 
Johnsen, Karl 



Johannessen. Jonas 
Johnson, Hllmar 
Khamp, S. 
Kinnunen. Anttl 
Kennedy, J. R. 
I.nngren. Chas. 
Lutke, F. C. A. 
fUson, Oswald 
Malkoft. Peter 
Malmherg, E. 
Martinson. Adolph 
Melners. Herman 
Miller, F. W. 
Miller, Walter 
Ne\^nian, I. 
Nystrom, R. 
Olson. A 
Olsen, Alf 
Patterson, E. G. 
PfHlersen, N. B. 
Petersen, Axel 
Rahlf, .L 
RIsenlus. Sven 
Rosenblad, Otto 
Smvth, J. B. 
Sfalt. Axel 
Stanbeck, A. 
StenrooK, Frank 
Svenson. B. 
Torln, Gustaf A. 
Valfors, Arvld 
WIIllamB, T. C. 



L. V. WESTERMAN 

UNION LABEL 

CLOTHIER, FURNISHER A HATTEII 

Alaska Outfitter 

TWO BIG STORES 

ttor« No. 1— Cor. Main and FIrtt 

Store No. 2— Westlake and Pin* 

SEATTLE 



Bonney- Watson Co. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Servic* 

Crtamatory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. Eaat IS 



PUGET SOUND 
NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical Collece. 
Room 4140 ARCADE BUILDING 
Third Floor, First Avenue Side 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlra-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLB 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

S1B-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem PoU 
BKATTLB. WASH. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



WESTENHAVER BROS. 

CUT-RATE STORE 

$5.00 Less on a Suit or Overcoat. 
Shirts, Shoes, Oil Skins, Rubber Boots, 
Overalls, Underwear, Sox, Pants. 

We make a special effort to carry 
In stock everything for 

SAILORS and MILL MEN 

UNION STORE 

208 East Heron St., - Aberdeen 
Between Rex and Wear Theaters 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCX OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES. OVERALLS. SHIRTS 

A. M. 8ENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - Ab«rd»«n 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



A. A. Star Transfer 

Successor to CHRIS PETERSON 

EXPRESS— BAGGAGE 

AUGUST WALLIN, Prop. 

Retired Member Sailors' Union 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

EVERYTHING GUARANTEED 
UNION MADE GOODS 

Orders Taken for Made-to-Measur« 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

Heron and F. Sts., Aberdeen, Wash. 
1st and Commercial Sts., Raymond, Wash. 



Phone 2«3 

"Ole and Charley" 

"The Royal" 
"The Sailors' Rest" 

Cigars, Tobaccos and Soft Drinks 
Zit EIGHTH ST., HOQUIAM, WASH. 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 




Poverty 
is A Crime! 

IT Isn't a crime to be poor, any mora 
than it is to be murdered. The poverty- 
stricken man ifl not a criminal. Ha 
is a victim of a crime for which others 
as well as himself are responsible. Henry 
George 33 years ago eave a lecture be- 
fore the Knights of Labor the title of 
which was 

'*The Crime of Poverty" 

It has Bince become a classic and hsa 
touched the spark of ambition in tX.i 
hearts of thousands of men and inspired 
ihem to better things. 
Yon can get a copy of this gripping lec- 
ture, well printed in a neat, cloth-boui.i 
book, and THE PUBLIC. A Journal of 
Democracy, for 13 weeks for only 65 
cents. Let THE PUBLIC be your in- 
terpreter, aa it is for many of the great 
liberal thinkers of the day : Brand Whit- 
lock, U. S. Minister to Belgium ; Wm. 
C Colver, Federal Trade Commissioner; 
Bay Standard Baker, and hundreds of 
others. 

Frank P. Walsh, Joint-Chalr- 
inan of the National War Labor 
Beard says: 

Every worker in America should 
he a subscriber to THE PUBLIC. 
All lovers of justice are striving 
toward the same end. THE PUB- 
LIC points the zvay. 
Write your name and address clearly on 
the margin, attach 65 cents, stamps or 
money order, and with the first number 
of THE PUBLIC we will send you a 
cloth-bound and handsomely printed 
copy of "The Crime of PoTerty." 

THE PUBLIC 

122 E. 37th St., New York City 



Portland, Or., Letter List 



Amundsen, Ben 
Anderson, Albert 
Anderson. C. 
Ahren, Wm. J. 
Backman. Peter W. 
Bleler. B. 
Bohm, Franz 
Boyle. H. 

Chrlstensen, E. H. 
Chrlstensen, H. P. 
Cunningham, G. F. 
Daiil, Louis 
De Long, K. 
Duret, J. E. 
Ellegaard, M. 
Elliot, Austin A. 
Erlckson, John E. 
Gulldersen. W. B. 
Gelger, Joe 
Graaf, John 15. 
Hanson, August 

-1134 
Harding. Ellla 
Hartman, Fritz 
Hauschlld. B. 
Heino, Gust. 
Hellman, H. "W. 
Henriksen, Geo. 
Herman. David 
Hickey, E. J. 
Hogstrom. Karl I. 
Holmes, George 
Huber, C. L. 
Johansson, Charles 

-2407 
Jorgenson, Earl 
Jensen, H. T. 
Johnson, C. A, 
Jordan, H. S. 
Kaae. A. 
Knofsky. E. 'W. 
Krlstiansen, Wm. A. 
Laatzen, Hugo 
Larsen, C. J. 



Larsen, Hans 

Larson, C. -1632 
Learch, Paul 
Iveskinen, F. 
Matson, Hemming A 
Matson. H. -1808 
Melgant, F. 
Michaels. R. 
Miller. Victor 
Miller, Harry 
Mlkkelsen. Harry 
Murphy. Frnnfis Leo 
Newkirk, Clifford 
Nordman, Alek 
Nielsen, Jens 
Nilsen, Chas. 
Nelson, Harry 
Ogllvle. Wm. A. 
Ohlson, J. A. 
Olson, John 
Olson, Chas. 
Paulsson, Herman 
Petersen. Anton 

-1S75 
Petesen, Knut 
Petter. G. 
Rensmand. Robert 
Ross, Geo. 
Rulsgaard, Soren 
Ruud, Ole H. 
Rytko. Otto 
Samuelsen. S 
Schmeltning, Max M. 
Schroder, August 
Schultz, F. E. 
Sibley, Milton 
Slebert, Gust 
Steenson. Edward 
Swenson, C. E. 
Thore-sen, Inerwald 
Tnhkanon. .Tohan J 
■Wold. Frank 
"Wood, E. E. 



San Pedro Letter List 

Amesen, Frank Leisener, A. 

Anderson, P. A. Linden, M. 

-1G95 LIndholm, Chas. 

Anderson. Sven Lindstrom, J. A. 

Andree. E. A. I.junggren, Albin 

Billington, I. A. Lonngren, Carl 

Bergh, B. Magnusen, Karl 

Brandes, W. M. Malmberg, Ellis 

Brelen, Hans Martin, George 
Corregsona. Vincent Mathis, Hartley 

Davis, Orvllle Matsen, Hemming 

Deneen, Frank A. Meyer, Claus 

Edmonds, Jack Monterro. John 

EUingsen, Wm. Nelson, Chas. R. 

Emmerz, A., Nielsen, S. 

Evensen, Ed. Ole, Olesen 

Exlesan, Herman Olin, Emil 

Falvig, .Tnhn Olsen, Martin 

Fisher, W. -707 Osterhaff, Henry 

Folke, Harry Pedersen, Halver 

Frank, Paul Petersen, Hugo 

Franzell, A. H. Raaum, Henry 

Ganser, Joe Rasmussen, S. A. 

Grassen, Yan Reith, C. 

Gregory. Joe Repson, Ed. 

Gunderson, B. C. Roed, H. 

Gunnerud Torvald Roed, L. A. 

Hansen, Olaf Rosenblad, Billy 

Hansen, Bernard Ross, Wm. 

Hansen, John Samson, I,ouis 

Hansen, Johan Sanders. Chas. 

Artur Schmitd, Louis 

Hansen, Chas. L. Sheild. Oscar 

Heeshe. Henry Sindblom, Ernest W. 

Hill, Fred A. Skogberg. J. 

Holmes, Frank Smehorg, Olaf B. 

Hubner, Carl F. Snarberg, Charles 

Johansen, Carl Sternberg, Alf. 
Johansen, Anton A. Stenroos, A. W. 

Johnson, Matt Stone, Victor 
Johnson, L. T. -483Strom, C. L. 

Johannson, N. A. Sturankesken, M. 

Johanson, John Suominen, Oscar 

Johanson, Fritz Swanson, Ben 




SHARE JN/THE\VICTORY 



^-^^^^/' 



/save FOR YOVRCOVNTRY ' [^ SAVE FOR YOVRSELF 

/bVY WAR^SAYINGS STAMPS 

if/ I Pc:^ V 



l^a^Kell Cof^irv. 



CARRY ON! 

Uncle Sam is releasing from his service the men who went "over 
there" to free the world from autocracy. Thousands of soldiers are 
daily receiving their honorable discharges; they pocket their pay, 
bid farewell to their comrades, and Scdly forth — civilians. 

There is one army, however, which must not be demobilized. 
That is the army of War-Savings Stamp buyers. More recruits are 
needed to carry on the campaign of readjustment which follows 
the signing of the armistice. 

The army of fighters has achieved its purpose. 

The army of savers must remain in "action." 

"Carry on" to a lasting peace under the banner of W. S. S.! 



Johanson, J. A. 
Johnson, J. E. 
Jonasen, J. 
Jones, Erest L. 
Kallio, Frank 
Kind, Herman 
Kolodzieg, George 
Kristoffersen, A. 
Larsen, J. -1542 
Lechemus, Bill 



Thompson, Alex. 

Thompson, Maurice 

Toivonen, F. 

Vizcarra, Oscar 

Wrigg, F. 

Wilhalmson, Karl 
J.Wahi, J. 
B.Yarvinen, V. H. 

Teaman, W. E. 

Zunderer, Heo 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Alfredsen, Adolf Marks, Walter 
Anderson, Harold F.Martenson, Adolp 
Carlstrand Gustaf Martinsson, E. 
Houge, Anton Meyer, Karl 

Kennedy, James ReaNielsen, Alf. W. 
Kennedy, Jas. Rea Nelson, C. W. 

(Package) Olsen, Robert 

Lapauble, Jean Reilley, Ralph 

Pierre Leyfried, M. -2962 

Magail, Michael 



You Want the Truth 

ThlB year there will be stirring times 
In the Nation. Under government cen- 
sorship It Is increasingly difficult for 
the average man to get the real mean- 
ing of the social and political move- 
ments of the day. 

LA FOLLETTE'S 
MAGAZINE 

win be specially represented at Wash- 
ington and will analyze and present the 
news from the capital truthfully and 
fairly. Senator La Follette Is making a 
real flght to lift some of the tax bur- 
dens from tne common people and place 
them where they belong — on excess 
profits, war profits and surplus fortunes 
and Incomes. Because of this he Is be- 
ing attacked more bitterly than any 
other m^n in public life 

Send In your order today. 

$1.00 Per Year— Agents Wanted 

La Follette's Magazine, Madison, Wis. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

I am representing the Union men 
who are entitled to salvage and 
members of the crew of the fol- 
lowing v&ssels. In most cases ac- 
tion has commenced. In some cases 
ihe funds have been recovered. In 
others they are readily recoverable 
upon filing power of attorney form 
with me. Address this office by letter. 
"Princeton" vs. "Ardmore,"' $7500 re- 
ceived. "Gulf of Mexico" vs. Bark 
"Portugal," $5000. "Gulf Coast" vs. 
"Boxleaf," settled. "Argonaut" vs. 
"Jason," funds received. "Iroquois" 
vs. "Skinner," settled, crews share 
$12,250. "Brasos" vs. "Iroquois," set- 
tled. "Maine" vs. "Theresa Ac- 
comme.'" "Oskawa" vs. "Westgrove." 
"Buda 2" vs. "Western Star." "St. 
Charles" vs. "Monte Cenis." "Flor- 
ence Olsen" vs. "Marina." Flor- 
ence Olsen" vs. "Claremont." "Alli- 
ance" vs. "Belvernon." "Donnelly" 
vs. "Irish." "Anacortes" vs. "S. O. 
Barge No. 95." "Fred W. Wcllor" 
vs. "Overbrook." "Neptunas" vs. 
"Panama." "Quincy" vs. "Transpor- 
tation." "Herman Frash" vs. "Bril- 
liant." "O'Neil" vs. "Oregon." Bark 
"Superior." "Pan American" vs. 
"Santa Rita." "St. Charles" vs. 
"Tea." Tug "Navigator" vs. "Edgar 
H. Vance." "Tunica" vs. "Neppon- 
ier." "Lake Charles" vs. "Cantiwo." 
Silas B. Axtell, 1 Broadway New- 
York City. 8-20-18 



Home Newt 



The Utah Legislature passed an 
anti-picketing law and adjourned 
sine die. Tlie special session lasted 
seven days. The anti-picketing law 
prohibits persons from patrolling in 
front of an establishment for the 
purpose of driving away patronage. 

John D. Rockefeller has con- 
tributed $2,000,000 to the Ministers 
and Missionary Board of the North- 
ern Baptist Convention. No re- 
strictions are made as to the use of 
tlic principal and income, which will 
be expended to take care of indigent 
[baptist ministers of the Northern 
States. The announcement of the 
gift was made in a letter to the 
Rev. E. T. Tomlinson, executive 
secretary of the board. 

Detailed accounts of the receipts 
and expenditures of the Young 
Afcn's Christian Association have 
been made public by the organiza- 
tion's National War Council Finance 
Committee. They show that $125,- 
282,859 was received between April 
26, 1917, and March 31, 1919. Total 
expenditures aggregated $97,817,005, 
leaving a balance of $27,465,854, a 
sum estimated to be sufficient to 
carry on the work here and abroad 
until next December 31. 

A decrease in the mineral output 
of the United States during 1918. 
together with an increase in its 
value, is shown by the preliminary 
report of the Geological Survey. 
Although the total amount pro- 
duced was less than in 1917, its 
value was a half-billion dollars 
more. The quantity of petroleum 
marketed increased 4 per cent., but 
its value increased 32 per cent. 
I'ive per cent, more coal was pro- 
duced, but its total value was in- 
creased 17 per cent. 

With the country threatened with 
an influx of millions of aliens seek- 
ing to escape the war tax burdens 
of Europe, the Republican leaders in 
Congress have decided to put up the 
bars and keep them up until a 
]jermanent immigration policy can 
he established. Immigration is now 
rigidly restricted by war-time regu- 
lations under which the immigrant 
must obtain a passport from his 
government and its vise by an 
American consul. United States 
Consuls are instructed to refuse vises 
to undesirable persons. 

F. C. Grimes, associate professor 
in the division of cheinistry at the 
University of California has pro- 
posed the use of bombs made of 
baking powder as a means of fight- 
ing forest fires. According to 
Grimes baking powder when heated 
createst a gas which will smother 
flames. He suggests dropping bags 
of the material from airplanes in 
advance of the flames, thus form- 
ing a barrier which will develop 
gas so soon as the flames reach 
the portion of the forest where the 
powder lies. 

Expectation of the War Depart- 
ment that American troops will be 
retained in Siberia, until January, 
1920, if not longer, was indicated 
recently when Secretary Baker re- 
quested the seven affiliated welfare 
associations to continue their work 
among these troops "for a further 
period of three or four months, or 
until such time as the army is in a 
position to undertake this responsi- 
bility." Baker has said in reply to 
questions by members of Congress 
that the withdrawal of the Siberian 
expedition was awaiting the de- 
cision of President Wilson. 



14 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Twelve American-owned steam- 
ships, aggregating 70,000 deadweight 
tons and valued at more than $10,- 
000,000, the property of a German 
subsidiary of the Standard Oil Com- 
pany of New Jersey, have been 
ordered from German ports to the 
Firth of Forth for allocation among 
the allied and associated nations re- 
cently at war against Germany. 

Recently Chairman John Barton 
Payne of the Shipping Board an- 
nounced that a number of news- 
paper articles showing that ships 
were laid up for repairs were given 
forth to reduce the prices the Gov- 
ernment is fixing for the Emergency 
Fleet vessels. He stated that the 
production of American shipyards is 
as fine as that of any other plant. 

After October 30, the Chinese 
Maritime Customs will not pass a 
cargo unless it is accompanied by 
invoices and other documents. The 
American Chamber of Commerce in 
China has asked that this informa- 
tion be given exporters, who are 
urged to mail invoices so that they 
may arrive with the cargo, and 
avoid criticism of American trade 
methods at this time. 

The Todd Shipyards Corporation 
has in hand at its Tietjen & Lang 
plant, Hoboken, N. J., the Brazilian 
steamship "Leopoldina," formerly 
the "Bluecher," of the Hamburg- 
American line. The vessel is a pass- 
enger liner of 14,000 tons and be- 
fore the Brazilians seized her, she 
was pretty thoroughly wrecked be- 
low by her crew. After temporary 
repairs she came up to New York 
from Rio de Janeiro in a little more 
than seven months and for weeks 
the officers and crews were doubtful 
if they ever would reach port. They 
finally arrived on June 12. The 
boilers were leaky^ and in bad 
condition. Emery dust had been 
sprinkled in the engine bearings. 
Work on the vessel is progressing 
rapidly and she will soon be in 
even better shape than before the 
war caused her internment in Rio 
de Janeiro. 

As a result of keen competition 
expected to develop in the trans- 
portation of overseas commerce fol- 
lowing a liberal increase in the 
available tonnage of ships, American 
shipping concerns are now preparing 
to discard the steamship as a 
freighter and adopt the more eco- 
nomical motor-ship, according to ad- 
vices received from- New York. The 
initial announcement of an American 
concern pledging its future to the 
construction and operation of the 
vessel propelled by the internal com- 
bustion engine was that the Ameri- 
can Shipping and Commerce Com- 
pany, with a subscribed capital of 
$46,000,000, had been launched and 
that the program contemplated the 
immediate building of a big fleet of 
motor-ships which would be used to 
sustain this country's growing su- 
premacy as a maritime nation. The 
new shipping concern is owned by 
the Kerr Navigation Company of 
New York and William Cramp & 
Sons Ship and Engine' Company of 
Philadelphia. The latter concern has 
purchased the American rights to 
manufacture two of the most suc- 
cessful European Diesel engines, 
which will be constructed at Phila- 
delphia, to be installed in big cargo 
carriers to be built at the same 
plant. 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

526 California Street, San Francisco, CaL 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH. Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30, 1919. 

Assets $60,509,192.14 

Deposits 57,122,180.22 

•japital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,387,011.92 

Employees' Pension Fund 306,852.44 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GKO. rOURNY Vlce-Pres. and Mgr. A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and Caahlar 

K. T. KKUSE, Vice-President 

WILDIAM HKRRMANN, Assistant Cashier 

A. H. MULDER, Secretary 
WM. D. NEW^HOUSE, Assistant Secretary 
GOODFELLOW, EEDDS, MOORE & ORRICK, 
General Attorneys 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK A. H. R. SCHMIDT A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY 1. N. WALTER E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. T. KRUSE HUGH GOODFELLOW ROBERT DOLLAR 



E. A. CHRISTENSON 



L. S. SHERMAN 



San Francisco Letter List 

Letters at tlie San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from the date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
S. A. Silver, Business Manager, The 
Seamen's Journal, 69 Clay Street, San 
Francisco, Cal., to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Aguilar, Alf. Andejsson, A. O. 

Aimer, Robert Andersson, C. -797 

Alto H Anderson. John A. 

Altoiien,' Karl Anderson, John F. 

Andersen, O. -1301 Andersson, O. L. 
Andersen, F. -1473 Andersson, C. -2185 
Andersen, N. -197»Antonsen, A. I. 
Anderson, A. -2031 Ardt, Anton 
Anderson, James Arisludas, C. 
Anderson, Niels F. Armstrong, Bill 
Andersson, C. -2001 Ask, E. A. 
Andersson, GkJtfried Augustine. Anth. 
Andersson, Ingmar Auker, W. S. 
Andreson, Jorgen Austed, Barney 
Andreasen, O. -1334 



Balco, Juan 
Baris, K. C. 
Barlow, R. 
Barry, W. J. 
Baumann, Willy 
Bapliste, Li. 
Benson, Helge 
Benson, S. -S86 
Bentin, Paul 
Benluso Manl. 
Bergman, Gust 
Bergeson, Oscar 
Bjoikvist, Ragn 
Bjorka, Hans K. 
Bjorklund, G. 
Bleasing, W. 
Blomgren, C. A. 

Capallo, Joseph 
Cailsen, Julius 
Carlson, Joe 
Carlson, O. -454 
Carlson, Andrew 
Carlson, E. R. 
Carroll, James 
Cliristensen, K. D. 

-1042 
CInlstensen, H. C. 
Chrisiensen, R. H. 
Chrislenson, Einar 

Dahler, H. N. 
Dam berg, A. A. 
Daskeiand, N. N. 
Davis, Warren 
Dawson, Herebrt 
Delahanty, J. J. 
De Vroom, C. J. 

Eckhardt. Carl 
Kdler, Fritz 
Edward, Ole 
Ehlers, Heinie 
Eide, J. -962 
Ekeland, I. 
Eliasen, Einar 
Elliot, Pietro 

Fallon, W. 
Felsch, C. 
Fernstrom, F. 
Fitshenry, Gordon 
Folke, Harry 
Forslund, Fred 
Foss, L. 
Francke, Reynolds 

Gans, Frans 
Gasck, Willy 
Gerbaulet, J. W. 
Gibson, Geo. A. 
Gibson, William 
Gibson, C. R. 
Gil, Pedro 
Graham, W. F. 

Haak, R. 
Haggkvist, C. 
Ilakala, Paavo 
Ilakala, Paul 
Halley, W. 
Halverson, Erling 
Hammerquist, A. 
Hanneliu.s, R. F. 
Ilanschman, W. 
Hansen, E. E. 
Hansen, Henry 
Hansen, Scott 
Hansen, Hans P. 
Hansen, R. C. A. 
Heijarl, Aug. 
Heino, Aug. 
Ilelden, Harry 
Heldahl, T. 
Hellberg, Olof 
Henrikson, J. L. M 



Boll, Hans 
Borjesen, H. 
Borjesen, L. 
BornliOfen, P. P. 
Bosshard, Henry 
Bowman, Billie 
Boyes, A. 
Brain, Louis 
Brander, William 
Brandt, B. 
Bratl, A. V. 
Browne, Chas. B. 
Bruuin, E. -2583 
Bryant, J. S. 
Bugel, J. 
Byars, Terry 
Bye. K. 

Clausen, Louis 
Cockrane, R. 
Colman, John 
Conigan, R. B. 
Conrad, P. W. 
Cordey, Allan 
Correro. T. R. 
Cox, R. H. 
Craig, Tho. 
Crawford, T. A. 
Crowley, Fred 



Didriksen, Martin 
Diehl, Geo. A. 
Driscoll, John 
Douglas, W. F. 
Drysdale, H. 
Dumas, Clifford 



Ellis, Frank L. 
Elnard, J. 
Engblom, John R. 
Erickson, Gust W. 
Erickson, John 
Ernst, E. 
Esterberg, G. 
Evensen, Martin 

Frazier, H. B. 
Freitag, W. F. 
Fredriksen, Herman 
Frizzell, R. L. 
Frizzelli', Jack 
Frohne, R. 
Fuller, Geo. 



Gronroos, Iver 
Gronroos, John 
GuUaksen, Hans 
Gundersen, Andreas 
Gustafsson, Valter 
Gutmann, Paul C. 
M. -1123 



Henrlksson, W. 
Henzengo, Cornelio 
Hermansson, Frits 
Herrmann, Math. 
Hewell, 
Heyen, Thor 
Higglns, P. 
Him. Albert 
Hobbs, F. A. 
Hoglander, Martin 
Holmberg, Chas. 
Holmgren. G. J. 
Holland, D. 
Hollingsworth, W. C. 
Horner, A. 
Hreijan, Giuseppe 
Hugo. O. -1934 
Hubcrtz, Emll 
Hunter, Earnest 
Hvid, Hans 



Ingebretsen, Alf. Iversen, Iver 



Jacinto, Manuel 
Jacobson, Jacou 
Jaderholm, Hans 
Janson, C. J. W. 
Jansson, K. H. 
Jensen, Olaf 
Jensen, Lorentz 
Jensen, J. P. 
Jensen, S. P. 
Jensen, E. A. 
Jessen, Carl 
Johansen, Ola 
Johansen, Walter 

Kallberg, Arwld 
Kalning, H. 
Kariiu, Veda 
Karlgren, Gust 
Kasik, Aug. 
Keeney, F. W. 
Keith, John R. 
Kirby, G. D. 
Kittelsen, Karl 
Kjeld, K. 
Kjell, Karl 
Klug, Fred 
Knltzer, A. 

Lagerberg, Chas. 
Lahke, Nick 
Lamberg, H. 
Lambert, E. J. 
Lamberg, Herman 
Lambert, S. I. 
Landburg, Herman 
Langworthy, E. C. 
Larsen, Albin 
Larsen, Eskild 
Larsen, Kornelius 
Larsen, Flngl. 
Larsen, Kaare 

MacGregor, Donald 
Madsen, Ludvig 
Malmin, T. 
Marshall, I. S. 
Martins, Jose 
Mathis. H. 
Mathisen, A. 
Maxin, A. 
MeCallum, Chas. 
McManus, P. 
Meek. O. J. 
Merkley, M. M. 
Nagel, A. 
Nagle, Chris. 
Nelson, J. 
Nelson, C. J. 
Nelson, Fred 
Nelson, Waldemar 
Nelson, John, -1813 
Ness, Aksel 
Nielsen, StefEen 
Nilsen, Harry 
Nielsen, Villy 
Nielsen. Carl C. 
Ode, John 
Olaison, O. B. 
Ol.sen, Andres 
Olsen, P. J. -1005 
Olsen, J. -324 
Olsen, Marin us 
Olsen, Oskar 
Parson, Herman 
Pedersen, Eugene 
Pedersen, Eysten 
Hendlebury, Tom 
Perks, Fred 
Persson, O. W. 
Perselli, Geo. 
Peters, Edw. 



Johnsen, A. B. 
Johnsen, Albert 
Joliansen, A. -2183 
Johnsen, Walther 
Johnson, C. -2094 
Johnson, C. O. 
Johnson, John 
Jonson, Karl 
Jorgensen, Johannes 
Jorgensen, Ole E. 
Jorgensen. Joreen 
Juell, Ragnwald 

Knox, David 
Knudsen, Rangvald 
Kolustow, A. 
Kooistra. S. 
Komo, Martin 
Koppen, Bernt 
Koster, E. 
Knudsen, Martin 
Kristiansen, Henry 
Krohn, Harry 
Kuckens, Bernard 
KuUbom, Oscar 

Larsen, J. H. -2280 
Larsen, K. -166U 
Larson, Henry 
Lehmann, Richard 
Liesen, Wni. 
Ligoski, Joe 
Lindgross, L. H. 
Lindquist, Harry 
Loaretei, Jacob 
Lofgren. R. 
Lohne, E. 
Lonnqvist, John 
Lundquist, Axel 

Mettson, Carl 
Mikkelsen. Olaf 
Miller, Werner 
Mittemeyer, y. F. 
Moe, R. 
Moller, H. W. 
Monson, M. O. 
Moore, Thos. 
Morrison, Phillip 
Mosmanss, C. C. 
Myers, Gaylard R. 

Nielsen, C. -1303 
Nielsen, P. L. 
Nilson, Edon 
Nllsson. S. H. H. 
Noonan, J. 
Nordenberg, Alfred 
Nordstrom, Bror 
Norgard, Sigurd 
Nunes, C. C. 
Nyland. A. M. J. 
Nystrom, Arthur 

Olson, Albert 
Olsson, James 
Ord, W. v/d 
Ormond, David 
Osterholm, J. W. 
Osth, T. 

Pettersen, Franz 
Peterson, Jennings 
Peterson, M. 
Pettersen. Higbert 
Pfantsh, C. 
Pithcaithly, H. W. 
Porter, R. 
Post, Albert 



l^eters, J. M. 
Petersen, H. A. 
Peterson, Viktor 

Raaum, Johannes 
Ramstad, A. 
Ranta, Hj. 
Rasinussen, Jacob 
14asmussen, E. V. 
Rasmussen, Emil 
Rehnstrom, Axel 
Reiersgaard, H. 
Rlan, H. 

Saalma, Joseph 
Salilin, Nils 
Sandell, F. S. 
Sandquist, E. G. 
^sandblom, K. 
Santo, C. 
Sawdon, J. W. V. 
Schaab, Anton 
Schlieman, -2878 
Schlaclite, Alf. 
Scholtes, Berhard 
Shannon, J. 
Sjogren, E. -2960 
Skold, C. 
Sonnenberg, J. C. 
Sowick, B. 

Taft, Hans 
Teliefsen, Emll 
Tergersen, Tom 
Terry, J. E. 
Tliomas, Frank 
Thompson, C. 
Thorsen, Karl 

Van Fleet, F. B. 
Van Reen, T. R. A. 



Postel, Herbert 
Preen, P. A. van 

Richardson, J. W. 
Richardson, E. A. 
Riddell, Allan 
Rivera, John 
Roach, S. E. 
Ronning, H. 
Rosa, John 
Ross, Geo. 
Rosen, V. 

Smedsvig, O. B. 
Smith, T. J. 
Sparling, James 
Stenssloft, E. 
Sterberg, Alf. 
Stimpson, V. B. 
Stolzerman, E. 
Strand, A. E. 
Strandberg, Elof 
Straiten. Harry 
Sundwall, W. E. 
Suomlnen, Frans 
Suomihen, O. -1755 
Swanson, J. S. -2907 
bwanson, Oscar 

Thorstensen, Thom 
Timmers, H. P. 
Toftrl, A. 
Trygg, Gust 
Tyler, Frank 
Tyskman, H. 

Vander, Klift J. J. 
Victor, J. 



Wally, M. Wiljanen Otto 

Wamser, A. P. Wilks, J. 

Watkin, B. H. Wilkinson, Geo. 
Weelen, Tlieodorus Winter, Gotliard 

Welitje, W. H. Woods, E. J. -714 

Wheller, Geo. WoUman, Emll 
Wikstrom, W. 



Ziehr, C. 



Zunk, Bruno 



PACKAGES. 



Benson, Fred 
tOgan, Jonn 
Flood, Alex. 
Goodmans, G. 
Gunderson, Ols 
Hlgliland, D. 
Irmey, tTed 
Jewett, Chas. 
Johansen, S. R. 



Johaneson, K. 
Long. C. 

MacDonnell, W. A. 
Mayes, J. B. 
Monroe, A. J. 
Olsen, H. 
Olsen, Ole 
Utaon, Knut 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Members of the crew of the S. S. 
"Coamo" who were on board when 
she salved the S. S. "Corona" on or 
about March 25th, 1919, and towed 
her to Porto Rico, will kindly call 
or communicate with the undersigned 
as soon as possible. S. B. Axtell, 
No. 1 Broadway, New York. 

10-1-19 



Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of John Earnest Oberg, a member 
of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
last heard of in Seattle, Wash., April 
10, 1918, kindly notify his brother, 
Emil Oberg, 1160A York Street, San 
Francisco, Cal. 10-1-19 



L. H. Lindross, formerly on 
schooner "Commerce," is requested 
to call at the office of the U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 9-10-19 

phone Kearny 6361 

The Argonaut Tailors 

FRANK NESTROY 

Opposite Southern Pacific Bldg. 

60 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




WHITE PALACE SHOE STORE 

JOE WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Ejcclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Walt, by the Latest Machlnsry 

Work Called For and Delivered 
»VE USE ONLY THR BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 



CHRISTENSEN'S 
NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Established 1906 

CAPT, C. EHLERS, Superintendent 
257 Hansford Bldg 
268 Market Street 

The pupils of this well known school 
are taught all up-to-date requirements 
for passing a successful examination 
before the United States Steamboat 
Inspection Service. 




THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



IS 



Phone Kearny 5132 

East Street Tailors 

GENERAL OUTFITTER 

Altering done at moderate prices 

209 East Street, nr. Washington 

San Francisco 

H. LEVERIDGE 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 to 50 cents per day. 
Dr $2 to $3.00 per weelt, with all mod- 
ern conveniences. Free Hot and Cold 
Shower Baths on every floor. Elevatoi 
Service. 

AXEL LUNDGRBN, Manager 



Phone Garfield 2457 

HOTEL EVANS 

ED. COLL 
TH08. S. CHRI8TEN8EN 

Cor. Front St. and Broadway 



Phones: Office, Franklin 775» 

Res., Randolph 27 
Office Hours, 9 a. m. to B:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 



DENTIST 



No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Street* 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francl(co, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods 

50 EAST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



Phone Kearny 693 

Argonaut Outfitting Co. 

SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, 

SHOES, ETC. 

A Complete Stock at Most Reasonable 

Prices •• :: Union Made Goods Only, 

103 EAST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Residence, 1337 12th Ave. 
Residence Phone, Sunset 2957 

HENRY B. LISTER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

805-807 Pacific Building 

Phona Douglas 141B San Francisco 



LOOK 

For the Name and the Number 

GEO. A. PRICE 

19 East Street, San Francisco 

U. S. Navy Tower's 

Sea Boots Flannels Oil Skins 

SEAMEN— OUTFITTER— FISHERMEN 



Phone Douglas 3725 

EDWIN PERSSON 

139 East Street, San Francisco 

GENERAL SEAMEN'S 

OUTFITTER 

Union Made Goods 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN & NELSEN 
Gent^s Furnishing Goods 

Sayer's Oil Skin Clothing 
Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Missior 



Jortall Bros. Express 

Stand and Baggage Room 

— at — 

212 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



Reliable Tailor 

Up-to-date Cloths at Popular 
Prices. All work guaranteed. 

TOM WILLIAMS 

28 SACRAMENTO STREET 

Near Market 

Special Inducements to Seafaring Trade 

SUITS STEAM PRESSED, 50 Cts. 

The only way: no burninsr of 
garments. 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 



NAUTICAL BOOKS AND INSTRUMENTS 

MACARTHUR'S NAVIGATION LAWS 

CUGLE'S NAVIGATION BOOKS 



UNIFORMS and SUITS 

MADE TO ORDER, also READY TO WEAR 

CAPS, HATS, SHOES, ETC. 

OILSKINS, RUBBER BOOTS, BEDDING and BLANKETS 

SLOP-CHESTS AT WHOLESALE 



36-40 STEUART STREET 

D. W. PAUL, Outside Representative 

Southern Pacific Building 

Telephone Douglas 1082 




Named Shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET. BOSTON, MASS. 
CoUis Lovely, Gen. Pres. Ch««. L, Baine, S«c,-Trea». 




ARE YOUR LIBERTY BONDS SAFE 

Bring or send them lor safekeeping to this Savings 
and Commercial Bank and open a 

LIBERTY BONDS SAVINGS ACCOUNT 
We will take care of your Liberty Bonds for you 
free of charge. Our folder 

"What Shall I Do WItn Them" pTeat\:?for":'c%^Sy. 

Anglo-California Trust Company Bank 

"THE PERSONAL SERVICE BANK" 
Market and Sansome Streets Fillmore and Geary Streets 

Sixteenth and Mission Streets Third and Twentieth Streets 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO SEAFARING MEN 



UTTMARK'S NAUTICAL ACADEMY 

(Established 18S2) 
CAPTAIN F. E. UTTMARK, Principal 



8 State Street 
New York, N. Y. 



30 India Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



CANDIDATES PREPARED FOR MASTERS', MATES' AND 
PILOTS' EXAMINATION 

Our ACADEMY is recognized as the oldest and best equipped NAVIGATION 

SCHOOL in the United States and is up to date in every respect. For 

full information call at school or write. Catalog sent free on request. 

"UTTMARK'S FOR NAVIGATION" 




JACOB PETERSEN & SON 
Proprietors 

Established 1880 

ALAMEDA CAFE 

Coffee and 

Lunch House 

7 MARKET STREET 

and 

17 STEUART STREET 
IAN PRANCISCO 



News from Abroad 



SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light blue) appears on the 
box in which you are served. 

Issued by Aulhonlyoi the Cigar Make's '"">■ ■>' Union o 

Union-made Cigars. 

ilhis CtnlrfifS iw "» t««'> cont*f»i> .Till... 00. nj.. MKP mid. w. tisCass WodoHR 

'-- - ' ^ (irtMrt AiMfK* jnofumiJtioa devotee 

Tinman/* mt 



_ _ jn oruniiitioA devoted hi ihi dd 

wamm'cl ike iioev M/ifiRiAuMiiirt.iifiiiAi maim at rwr char 



UKuecnar 'hi btumuiia 'iiiiiin/iiioiui ukiokoi Amfn 



U*M CtQit\ to all Vrtt^n llMOMtHnfl IA» MOfld 

' Alt WiiA^ntiUjiSoMJu L«tei Mil l}e pum^lwd «ccading » i»H. 






President Pessoa of Brazil has an- 
nounced his desire to have Congress 
ratify the peace treaty immediately, 
without reservation of any kind. 

It is said that a forced loan by 
Holland of 450,000,000 guilders may 
be expected shortly. Under normal 
conditions the guilder is equivalent 
to about 40 cents in American 
money. 

More money than ever is now in 
circulation in English villages and 
its easy expenditure is apparent 
even to the casual passerby. Extra 
wages earned by workmen, house- 
maids and farm laborers have 
brought about an astonishing social 
change. 

Armed Korean insurgents are 
massing in Northeastern Korea 
awaiting favorable opportunity to 
sweep down upon the country, ac- 
cording to a dispatch from Tokio. 
The dispatch says a more serious 
uprising than the one of March 
last is anticipated and that Japa- 
nese troops are being held in readi- 
ness for such an emergency. 

Premier Clemenceau of France 
has written Colonel E. M. House, 
a member of the American peace 
delegation, urging that a meeting 
of the League of Nations be held in 
Washington under the chairmanship 
of President Wilson early in No- 
vember. 

A new official world's record for 
airplane speed has been made at 
Villa Coubay, France, by a Spad 
single-seater airplane, which accom- 
plished 184 miles an hour. This, it 
is claimed, is twenty miles faster 
than the speed made by any other 
flying machine. The Spad was 
equipped, with a 300 horsepower 
Hispano-Suiza motor. 

Floods in the northern part of 
Chiapas State, Mexico, caused great 
damage. The town of Chilon is re- 
ported to have been wiped out en- 
tirely. The number of dead has not 
been estimated, but it will be large. 
At least 600 houses have been de- 
stroyed and thousands of persons 
are homeless. The authorities at 
Chiapas have appealed to the cen- 
tral government for food. 

Not only coal oil but refined 
kerosene that may be burned in 
lamps is flowing from the mysterious 
oil wells at Ramsey near Peter- 
borough, Scotland. The oil was first 
discovered nearly two years ago 
rising to the top of water wells in 
that town. After 1000 gallons or so 
had been collected the flow di- 
minished and but two or three gal- 
lons were gathered from the top of 
the water each day until lately. 

Germany has delivered to General 
Dupont, commander of the inter- 
allied mission at Berlin, a memoran- 
dum declaring that it has recalled 
General von der Goltz, commander 
of the German troops in the Baltic 
provinces and Lithuania, has stopped 
pay, supplies and munitions to the 
German troops there and is doing 
everything possible to bring about 
the withdrawal of the German sol- 
diers in accordance with the de- 
mand of the Supreme Council. Gen- 
eral von Eberhard has been ap- 
pointed in place of General von der 
Goltz to take charge of the evacua- 
tion. The memorandum insists that 
Germany has exhausted its means of 
coercion and requests the appoint- 
ment of an allied commission to visit 
the Baltic province and verify this 
fact. 



16 



THE SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the WiU 



"What can be the cause of that 
crowd gathering over there?" "Oh, 
vulgar curiosity, I suppose. Let's 
go over." — Boston Transcript. 



Diner (just entered) — Hello, Jim! 
Anything new on the bill-of-fare to- 
day? The Other — There's a grease- 
spot I didn't notice there yesterday. 
— Buffalo Commercial. 



"Did you see daughter's bathing 
suit?" asked mother. "No," answered 
father. "I scarcely noted the suit. 
-Most of wiiat I saw was daughter." 
— Washington Star. 



"I made a 200-yard drive yester- 
day," said the golf nut. "You look 
to me," said the nice old lady, "like 
a man who ought to be ashamed to 
want to ride such a short distance 
as that." — Detroit Free Press. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equipped 
with all modern appliances to Illustrate and 
teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions Have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be. even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




"Of course, you would never think 
of deserting your party." "Never!" 
said Senator Sorghum. "On the con- 
trary, it sometimes takes quick work 
on my part to keep my party from 
deserting me." — Washington Star. 



Young Wife — Oh, Jack, you don't 
mean to say that you've found a 
flat? Husband— Not exactly, dear; 
but we're pretty fortunate. We are 
first in after a couple who have 
taken it for three years. — Edinburgh 
Scotsman. 



HORACE R. TAYLOR 



HENRY TAYLOR 



TAYLOR & TAYLOR 

510 Battery St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 

IMPORTERS OF NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 
LORD KELVIN'S and WHYTE THOMSON'S 
Compasses, Binnacles, Azimuth Mirrors, Sound- 
ing Machines, Sextants, Parallel Rulers, Pelorus Di- 
viders and Nautical Books of Eveiy dei.cription. 

COMPASS ADJUSTERS 



Vicar — Nothing to be thankful for! 
Why, think of poor old Hodge los- 
ing his wife through the flu! 

Giles — Well, that don"t do me no 
good. I ain't Hodge. — Farm and 
Home. 



She Was Willing. — Elderly One — 
A wife should defer to her husband's 
wishes, my dear. 

Younger One — I have done so ever 
since he told me his one wish was 
to see me happy. — Boston Tran- 
script. 



"Discharge that press agent im- 
mediately!" thundered the theatrical 
manager. "But," protested the finan- 
cial backer, "he has gotten some 
wonderful publicity." "That's the 
point. If the actors read all he has 
written they will become so im- 
pressed with themselves that there 
will be no hope of meeting salary 
demands." — New York Globe. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

!122-:i24 MISSION ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Children's Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe in a savings account. 

They cannot start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

7«S MARKET STREET. Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SEAMEN PLEASE TAKE NOTICE 

This store has been established on the Waterfront since 
1866— over 50 years. Enough said. 

We DO NOT Supply Cheap Mattresses or Bedding to Vessels 



J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 



72 EAST STREET 



Opposite Ferry Post Office 



Suits Made to Order — Union Label 



HENRY HEINZ 



When Y*u Buy 
from U*. Liberty 
Bonds are Ac- 
cepted for Ca«h. 



Diamonds 
Watches 



Phofia Douglaa ITBt 



ARTHUR HEINZ 
Original Mile 




SOLID GOLD t1.50 
aOLD FILLED .80 



64 MARKET STREET 



High Grade Watch Repairing Our Specialty 



FACTORY TO WEARER 

SEAMEN" When in Port- BE SURE 

You see the most complete line of 

UNION LABEL SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR 
and MEN'S FURNISHINGS IN THE U. S. A. 

Sold Direct to You at Manufacturer's Prices 




1118 Market St. 
San Francisco 
717 K St., near Postoffice 

Sacramento 
112-116 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles 



Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Silverware 

715 MARKET STREET, Above Third Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 




QamesJi. Sorenseit 



Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

Big Stock — Everything Marked in Plain Figures 

THE ONE-PRICE JEWELRY STORE 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 

At the Big Red Clock and the Chimes. 




Market at Fifth 
San Francisco 



H. SAMUEL 

THE OLD UNION STORE 

Clothing and Gents' 
Furnishing Goods 

Hat«, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, Boots, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oil Clothing 

All Kinds of Watches and Jewelry 

676 THIRD STREET 

At 3rd and Townsend, San Pranclsco, Cal. 

Phone Kearny 519 



SEAMEN! 
You Know M« 




I am 
"YOUR HATTER" 

FRED AMMANN 

I sell 
UNION HATS 
at the right prices. I'll try and 
wait on you personally and show 
you a large assortment and give 
you your money's worth. 

JOHN B. STETSON hats too. 

If you want your Panama blocked 

right, I'll do that. 

You'll find me at 

72 Market Street 

next to Ocean Market. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL [Am 

UNION MADE 



lED SCHL CMAI CO., riANlirACTUKCBS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phon* Douglas 1M0 



0m'^ 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE 

ilRGONAUTSHim 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXXIII, No. 7. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1919. 



Whole No. 2561. 



PETITION AND MEMORIAL 

On Behalf of the International Seamen's Union of America 



The Navigation Laws Revision Com- 
mittee, to whom the Petition and Me- 
morial herewith published has been ad- 
dressed, was recently appointed by the 
United States Shipping Board, with in- 
strnctions to deliberate and report upon 
such amendments to the Navigation Laws 
of the United States as the Board may 
deem to be needed for the better de- 
velopment of the American ATerchant 
Marine. 

The chairman of the committee is Mr. 
P. A. S. Franklin, president of the In- 
ternational Mercantile Marine Company. 
Two representatives of labor are on the 
committee; to wit, President Furnseth of 
the International Seamen's Union of 
America, and President Brown of the 
Marine Engineers' Benevolent Association. 
The other members arc: J. Barker Kerlin, 
Homer L. Ferguson, H. F. Alexander, 
David T. Warden, Alfred -Guilbert Smith, 
Eugene O'Donnell, and President McGrey 
of the Neptune Club. 

These gentlemen represent, respectively, 
the shipbuilding and shipowning interests 
of America, and the Masters and Pilots. 



Mr. P. A. S. Franklin, Chairman, 

Navigation Laws Revision Comn.illec, 
Custom House, New York City. 

Sir: The following "Petition and Memorial'' 
is hereby respectfully submitted through you 
to your Committee. It is our belief that this 
petition contains a very important truth and 
a practical proposition, which we hope may have 
the careful consideration of your Committee. 

It v.'as submitted to the President of the Uni- 
ted States on July 27, 1918. We know not 
what action, if any, wns taken; but we believe 
that if no action v^as taken it should be assigned 
to the then condition and not be presumed to 
arise from any demerit in the petition. 

We believe that wages being equal in foreign 
and American vessels the advantage in the com- 
ing international competition will go to the 
country having the highest skilled seamen, as- 
suming always, that such seamen ))c used wher- 
ever possible in handling of the vessel and her 
gear and in keeping the vessel, her gear and 
machinery in such condition as will keep the 
vessel from the repair shops for the longest pos- 
sible periods. 

This requires the most highly skilled officers 
and men, and we are convinced that nothing 
short of co-operation of the personnel and the 
shipowner, together with a single-minded guid- 
ance by the Department, can accomplish this 
much needed reform. 



Respectfully submitted by the Legislative 
Committee, International Seamen's Union of 
America. 

Petition and Memorial. 
To the President of the United States: 

On behalf of the International Seamen's 
Union of America, we, the undersigned, respect- 
fully petition that the personnel of the Mer- 
chant Marine be withdrawn from the adminis- 
trative jurisdiction of the Department of Com- 
merce and the Shipping Board, and be placed 
under the administrative jurisdiction of the 
Department of Labor. 

This petition and memorial is not an accusa- 
tion or a complaint against any individual. It is 
not a criticism of any department. We seek to 
get from under a bad system. In suggesting 
this proposed change we submit a statement of 
some features of the administration of the Mer- 
chant Marine which we believe will justify the 
change for which we pray. 

The Merchant Marine With its two factors — 
the instrumentalities the ships and the person- 
nel, the seamen — at the beginning of this Gov- 
ernment was placed under the administrative 
jurisdiction of the Department of the Treasury. 

It was then the general belief that these tv. o 
factors of the industry — the material and the 
personnel — would reach the highest development 
possible if placed under the administrative head 
of one department. Under the xlirection of this 
department the principles now governing the 
administration of the Shipping Commissioners 
Act and the Inspection laws were developed. 
P'ar from realizing the expectation of the coun- 
try our sea power gradually declined until we 
were left with comparatively few vessels and 
fewer seamen. 

There have been many administrators; some 
great, some indifferent; all honest and generally 
capaljle. We do not charge that this loss of sea 
power was their fault. Unsound systems fall by 
gravity and the greatest of men can only de- 
lay, they can not prevent the downward trend. 

The Department of Commerce, formerly the 
Department of Commerce and Labor, was cre- 
ated to give systematic encouragement to indus- 
trial production and to trade. The liasic idea 
of this department is that the two factors in 
industrial production and trade, the instrumen- 
talities and the personnel, could be brought to 
the highest point of efficiency under one ad- 
ministrative head. The energies of the De- 
partment were naturally exerted to the im- 
provement of tools, methods and organization, 
to increasing the productive power of the in- 
struments in use, to creating new instruments, 
all to aid to greater efficiency and to cheapen 
production. 

But whatever success was attained in dealing 
with tlie instrumentalities gradually the person- 
nel was neglected and became of minor im- 
portance in the view of the Department. The 
personnel suffered. It failed to follow the up- 
ward trend. Skill and general efficiency in 
workmen must follow the improvements in ma- 
chinery or the improvements to a large extent 
are wasted. 

L^pon the entry of our country into the war, 



the Shipping Board was created to accelerate 
the building of and to rehabilitate our Merchant 
Marine. The success which has attended its 
building program is unparalleled in the world's 
history. But while it has concentrated "- upon 
this building problem with such success, it is 
facing failure in the manning of this new fleet. 

Except in rare instances and only after 
long experience does the mind, occupied with 
the mechanical aspects of civilization, compre- 
hend fully the fundamental distinction between 
the inanimate instruments and the men who 
operate the instruments, and that the problems 
of each of these factors must be dealt with in 
a different spirit. In recognition of this fact tin- 
Department of Labor was created. 

The duty of the Department of Labor is to 
stimulate skill, -to aid in the distribution of 
labor and to aid the laborer in obtaining re- 
munerative employment; to see that labor is 
employed under conditions^ conducive to safety, 
health and comfort. The controlling thought of 
this Department is development of a highly 
skilled and efficient personnel for all branches 
of industry. It deals with men. To be success- 
ful the Department must know and sympathize 
with the working men, it must gain and keep 
their confidence. It is the one place in our 
Government to which the laborers may bring 
their grievances strong in the faith that they 
will not be misunderstood, confident of a 
sympathetic hearing and in so far as it reason- 
ably may be, certain of assistance to right 
wrongs and compel fair treatment. 

The personnel of the Merchant Marine is in 
a peculiarly difficult position. 

The inspection service acting under the su- 
pervision of the Secretary of Commerce is 
authorized to make rules to see that every 
steam vessel "is in condition to warrant the 
belief that she may be used in navigation with 
safety to life." The local inspectors are charged 
with the execution of these rules. 

This same inspection service is authorized to 
make rules governing the issuance of licenses 
to officers, to examine aiiplicants, to grant or 
withhold licenses, and the execution of these 
rules is made the duty of tiiese same local in- 
spectors. 

It is the duty of these same local inspectors 
to examine into and report upon accidents and 
disasters at sea and as part of that duty they 
are empowered to suspend or revoke the 
licenses of officers. The presumption is that 
whenever a vessel is permitted to go to sea it 
is seaworthy. It has been inspected and has 
been passed. The personnel on joining the 
ship may find that the vessel is not seaworthy. 
Its hull, eguii)nient or personnel may not be 
what it ought to lie; but as it has been passed, 
to make complaint as to any deficiencv is 
ecpiivalent to an accusation against the local 
inspectors of neglect of duty. It would be 
passing strange if under such conditions reports 
or complaints of unseaworthiness were to come 
in any great number from the personnel. Risks 
that ought not to be assumed are taken as a 
matter of course. 

When accidents have occurred and it is not 



clearly shown that such were unavoidable it 
equally is a matter of course that the personnel 
of the ships are blamed and punished. The 
accident if not unavoidable, could result only 
from the neglect of duty either by the in- 
spectors or by the personnel. Inevitably in- 
justice or what is honestly felt to be injustice 
occurs, and this in spite of the most conscien- 
tious administration of the Department. The 
result is diminution in efficiency in both the 
personnel and the ships. 

A somewhat similar condition attaches to the 
service of the Shipping Commissioners. These 
were intended to be employment officers. The 
commissioners were to keep a register of sea- 
men. Neither of these purposes have been at- 
tained. Such registers would have disclosed the 
rapid downward trend and a remedy might have 
been found. If such registers had been kept as 
the law contemplated, these would be of very 
great value to the country at the present 
time. 

These commissioners might be presumed to be 
ill close touch with the men employed and to 
be informed of facts connected with the vessels, 
facts which from the peculiar position of the 
inspectors would not reasonably come to them. 
But these Shipping Commissioners are report- 
ing to the same Departments as the inspectors, 
and so the Department is not burdened with re- 
ports or complaints. 

We believe that these conditions would gradu- 
ally pass away if the personnel and the in- 
struments were under the administrative jiiris- 
(licton of different departments. We belie'- 
that under such condition one Department would 
automatically stimulate the other and neither 
of the factors would be neglected. We further 
believe that the public interest in both the 
factors would be stimulated, that the under- 
standing of, and the interest in the develop- 
ment of real sea power would be materially 
increased. Confident of your sympathetic in- 
terest we respectfully submit this petition and 
memorial to you for such action as you shall 
deem proper and wise. 
Respectfully vours, 

ANDREW FURUSETH, 

V. A. OLANDER. 

PATRICK FLYNN. 
Legislative Committee International 

Seamen's Union of America. 



REPORT OF SEAMEN'S DELEGATES. 

(On the Sntc Federation of Labor convention 
proceedings.) 
To the Sailors' Union of the Pacific— CoiTM-adcs, 

Greeting: 

Your delegates to the Twentieth Annual Con- 
vention of the California State Federation of 
Labor, which was held at Bakersfield. Cal., 
October 6-10 inclusive, hereby respectfully re- 
port as follows: 

iMore than 200 delegates were in attendance 
at the convention, and the volume of business 
transacted was the greatest In the history of 
the State Federation, 82 propositions being in- 
troduced and acted upon, against 46 at the San 
Diego convention ^ year ago. 

The convention was called to order by R. L. 
Rinker, President of the Kern County Labor 
Council. The invocation was delivered by the 
Rev. Benj. E. Diggs of St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church, Bakersfield. C. F. Johnson, on behalf 
of the County Government, and Board of Trade, 
and H. C. Katze, Secretary of the Chamber of 
Commerce, w-elcomed the delegates and visitors 
to the city. A particularly noteworthy incident 
was the statement of Secretary Katze that the 
local Labor Council was represented on the 
Board of Directors of the Bakersfield Chamber 
of Commerce. This disclosure of the friendly 
relations existing between labor and ca|)ital was 
greeted with hearty applause. 

President Murphy responded to the greetings 
of welcome in his usual appropriate maiiner. 

President Murphy, in his report, said that 
since the armistice had been signed many em- 
ployers have renewed their attacks upon labor 
organizations, and particularly directed the at- 
tention of the delegates to the conditions pre- 
vailing in Southern California. He .said that the 
efforts to secure remedial legislation by the 
last Legislature failed because of the "reaction- 
ary" character of its personnel, and advised 
members of labor unions to procure and study 
the labor record of members of the Legislature 
issued by the State l'"edcration. He called at- 
tention to the "Farmer-Labor" alliance and 
recommended its continuance. He said that 
since the closing of the war profiteering has 
been unrestrained and that the consequent de- 
preciated purchasing power of wages has caused 
general unrest. 

The reports of the Vice-Presidents and Or- 
ganizers show a steady and gratifying increase 
of the Federation in strength and numbers, new 
unions being formed all over the State, despite 
the apparent concerted effort now being made 
to discourage membershjp in labor unions. 

The report of the delegate to the American 
Federation of Labor was a comprehensive one 
and is printed in full in the Advance Reports of 
Officers. 

The report of the Secretary-Treasurer showed 
a net increase in membership of the State Fed- 
eration of approximately 17,000 (making a total 



of 94,900). The number of local unions affiliated 
with the State Federation is 515, as against 486 
in 1918; Labor Councils, 24, as against 21 a 
year ago. 

The Executive Council recommended that the 
publisliing of the official Year Book be discon- 
tinued, and the convention concurred in the 
recommendation. 

A recommendation from the Executive Coun- 
cil, prohibiting the use of the designation, 
"Official organ of the State Federation of La- 
bor," by any publication was adopted by the 
convention. 

Summary of Resolutions Adopted. 
Approving the purposes sought to be achieved 
by the Industrial Conference now being Iield in 
\Vashington and expressing gratification for the 
honor conferred upon the labor movement in 
California by the appointment of Secretary 
Scharrenberg as a member of the conference. 

Amending Article VIII, Constitution, relating 
to employment of attorneys and incurring finan- 
cial obligation thereby. 

.^mending Article I, Section 6, sub-section 
(b), relating to the seating of delegates whose 
unions are not affiliated with the State Federa- 
tion of Labor. 

Relating to the purchase of Thrift Stamps, 
War Savings Certificates and Treasury Savings 
Certificates, and urging affiliated locals to co- 
operate with the Government in the sale there- 
of. 

Relating to the enfranchisement of women by 
Congress and requesting the Governor to call a 
special session of the Legislature to ratify same. 
Relating to an amendment to the Penal Code 
of the State of California, concerning applica- 
tion for new trial where new evidence has been 
discovered, and instructing the officers of the 
State Federation to carefully revise proposed 
amendment before presentation as an initiative 
amendment. 

Edorsing the organization of the News 
Writers' Union and pledging the moral support 
of the State Federation. 

Relating to the unfair competition of the 
Philipijine cigar manufacturers, through the 
cigar trust, and favoring the granting of inde- 
pendence to the Filii)inos as promised by this 
Government. 

Pledging the support of the State Federation 
to the membership campaign of the American 
Red Cross and urging affiliated unions to pro- 
mote the same. 

Demanding adequate compensation for postal 
employees to enable them to live according to 
American standards. 

Protesting against laying off of competent 
molders at Mare Island Navy Yard and award- 
ing contracts for castings to a notoriously un- 
fair concern, thus taking away work from Mare 
Island that properly and economically belongs 
there. 

Relating to the discrimination by the authori- 
ties of the State Hospitals at Norwalk, Stock- 
ton and Agnew against members of the Hos- 
pital Employes' organization and directing the 
Executive Council to protest to the proper 
State officials against its continuance. 

Endorsing and commending the central labor 
bodies of the Bay Cities for their support of 
the striking shipyard workers of Los Angeles 
and urging affiliated unions to support the ship- 
yard strikers to the full extent of their power. 
Endorsing the boycott on the firm of E. Goss 
& Co., manufacturers of El Primo and other 
brands of cigars. 

The convention concurred in the report of the 
Committee on Officers' Reports on the following 
recommendations of the Executive Council, con- 
tained in the Secretary-Treasurer's report: 

Endorsing the revised platform tentatively 
agreed to, subject to the approval of the con- 
vention, between the State Federation, the 
Farmers' Union and the Co-operative League. 

Opposing Senate Amendment No. 10, which 
proposes a convention to frame a new constitu- 
tion for the State. 

Endorsing Assembly Amendment No. 19, 
changing the constitution to permit the giving of 
aid to needy children whose parents are in- 
capacitated for work. 

Endorsing Assembly Amendment No. 10, 
designated as the Absent Voters' Law. 

Opposing Assembly Amendment No. 13, i-n- 
posing a poll tax on aliens. 

Endorsing Assembly Amendment No. 40, ex- 
empting from taxation institutions sheltering 20 
or more orphans. 

Endorsing initiative measure to be submitted 
to the electors, regulating fees of employment 
agencies. 

A special committee appointed to consider a 
resolution on "Collective Bargaining," as enun- 
ciated by the American h'ederation of Labor, 
reported favorably and the report was adopted 
by the convention. 

Condemning State Senator Hart, proprietor 
of the Rosslyn Hotel of Los Angeles, for his 
unjust discrimination against waitresses in his 
hotel who were endeavoring to organize, and for 
his opposition to all of labor's measures at the 
last session of the Legislature, and declaring 
the Rosslyn Hotel unfair to organized labor. 

Approving campaign of publicity on matters 
pertaining to labor conditions to offset action 
being taken by many "civic bodies" in favor 
of the open shop. 



Endorsing request of moving picture opera- 
tors of Los Angeles that producers put union 
label on films. 

Favoring the cancellation of the "Gentlemen's 
Agreement," exclusion of "picture brides," rigor- 
ous exclusion of Japanese as immigrants, barring 
Asiatics from American citizenship, amending 
Federal Constitution so that no child born in 
the United States shall be considered an Ameri- 
can citizen unless both parents are of a race 
that is eligible to citizenship. 

Condemning the action of the San Francisco 
E.xaminer and Chronicle for denying the news 
writers employed on those papers the right lo 
organize and for discharging those who joined 
the N'cwswriters' organization. 

Protesting against the postal authorities in 
the city of Los Angeles working men and 
women as post office clerks more than eight 
hours. 

Endor.sing full moral and financial support of 
the striking shipbuilders. 

A question that provoked much discusison 
and took up considerable time of the convention 
was the proposal having for its purpose the en- 
rollment of organized labor under "One Big 
Union." After much discussion and maneuver- 
ing, the resolution was rejected, on roll-call, by 
a vote of 29,196 to 9539. 

Flavoring increased pay for enlisted men in 
the Navy. 

Endorsing the Metal Trades strike and urging 
affiliated unions to render financial aid to the 
strikers. 

With few exceptions the incumbent officers 
were elected for another yfar. 

A. J. Rogers, of San Francisco Bottlers' L'nion 
No. 293, was elected delegate to the next con- 
vention of the American Federation of Labor. 

Fresno was unanimously selected as the next 
convention city. 

The entertainment features at Bakersfield were 
pleasantly enjoyed by all who attended the con- 
vention. 

The work of the convention was carried out 
in a businesslike manner and your delegates are 
of the opinion that the progressive policy of the 
State Federation has borne splendid results and 
augurs well for the future growth and pros- 
perity of that organization. 

Respectfully submitted. 

ED. ANDERSEN, 
E. A. ERICKSON, 
C. F. MAY, 
HARRY OHLSEN. 



THE QUEER OLD WORLD. 



The longer I live the more I discern 
that this world of ours is a darn queer 
question. It's a crime to pick pockets, but 
it's perfectly right to pick a man's wages 
on Saturday night ; for the laws are con- 
structed wherever I've been that the work- 
ers are made for the grafters to skin. If 
you try to be honest you don't stand a 
chance; you are sure to be known by the 
patch on your pants. If you steal a few 
inillions you're a person of note; if you 
steal a ham-bone the police get your goat. 
If you run arottnd naked you are sent to 
the pen ; if you swipe some old clothing 
you go there again. If you murder in war 
your valor is sung; if you privately murder 
you're doomed to be hung. If a girl sells 
her virtue she's branded as vile ; but the 
rooster that bought it is met with a smile. 
If a man tells the truth then the people 
get tired ; if he tells them a myth they say 
he's inspired. It's a funny old world wher- 
ever you turn ; it's a devilish twisted and 
darned queer concern ; it's badly balled up 
and it's all out of tune, and must be a 
sight for the inan in the moon. — Henry M. 
Tickncr. 



Auditors who have examined the Ohio 
State-controlled insurance fund report that 
"the savMug to policy-holders insured in the 
fund, as compared with the rates charged 
by insurance companies conducted for profit 
in States with rates of compensation of 
approximately equal value, is at least 35 
per cent, of what it would have cost in 
such companies." The auditors were se- 
lected by the auditor of the State of Ohio, 
the secretary of the Ohio Manufacturers' 
Association and Secretary Donnelly of the 
Ohio State Federation of Labor. 



inn. sn/viviniN ;3 j\j\jr^w^i^ 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Weaken Seamen's Law. 

An attempt to weaken the Seamen's 
law is again being made by enemies of 
this progressive legislation, who want the 
apprenticeship period for an able seaman 
reduced from three years to six months at 
sea and six weeks in a training school, 
and reduce the number of competent sea- 
men on a vessel from 65 per cent, of its 
crew to 40 per cent. 

Congressman Rowe has introduced 
these amendments in the House of Rep- 
resentatives and they have been referred 
to the United States Shipping Board for 
an opinion. The board referred the matter 
to a committee which included in its mem- 
bers, vessel owners and President Furu- 
seth of the International Seamen's Union 
and President Brown of the Marine Engi- 
neers' Benevolent Association. The com- 
mittee held a meeting and the Shipping 
Board and vessel owners' representatives 
favored the amendments and the trade 
unionists opposed them. 

"Is the terrible 'Titanic' disaster forgot- 
ten?"' asked President Furuseth, in de- 
claring that the workers will fight the 
amendments every inch of the way. 

"The people back of this bill," he said, 
"are the same ones who, in one form or 
another, have been trying to destroy the 
Seamen's bill ever since it was enacted. 
For more than twenty years the Seamen's 
act was before committees of Congress. 
After all these years it was decided that 
the minimum experience necessary to 
qualify a man for an able seaman's rating 
was three years. This is the limit estab- 
lished by all the great maritime powers. 

"The section providing for 65 per cent. 
of the crew to be able seamen was agreed 
upon wholly as a matter of safety to 
vessels and persons who travel in them. 

"Yesterday the committee disposed of 
these questions in less than two hours, 
although the president of the board, ]\Ir. 
Franklin (president of the International 
INIercantile Marine Company), said he had 
never seen the bill before and others had 
not seen it until the night before. 

"If the bill becomes law American ships 
will be the poorest manned of any that 
float and the sea-going public will lack 
the protection they now enjoy. Real sea- 
men will not go to sea under such condi- 
tions." 



Makes a "Bone Play." 

George Rothwell Brown, staff corre- 
spondent of the Washington Post, made 
what baseball folks call "a bone play" last 
week in writing his observations on the 
Ohio end of the great steel strike. 

Brown has devoted every energy to 
show that "foreigners" are behind tlie 
strike: that "revolutionists" would over- 
throw the Government, and because of 
these conditions violence has resulted. 

He now ' acknowledges that the Ohio 
steel industry is "outwardly" prostrate, 
because of the strike, and although the 
percentage of foreign-born workers pre- 
ponderate in the Ohio steel industry, as 
in western Pennsylvania, Brown is incau- 



tious enough to close one of his articles 
as follows : 

"Two sets of conditions have helped to 
make the strike in Ohio a milder and 
more orderly proceeding than it is in Penn- 
sylvania. Four years ago and again two 
years ago the constitution of Ohio was 
amended. The laws of the State are more 
modern in some respects, more 'progress- 
ive,' than are those of Pennsylvania. Open 
assemblies of the strikers are permitted 
in Ohio, and rigorously forbidden across 
the boundary line. There is no State con- 
stabulary of 'Cossacks' in Ohio. A bill to 
provide for such a force was beaten in 
both houses of the Legislature at Colum- 
bus as late as last spring. 

"Also in Cleveland a political campaign 
is on for the election of city officials 
and the politicians are stepping around on 
eggs, as politicians always do just before 
voting time. Perhaps this explains why 
Cleveland has permitted the importation of 
no 'strikebreakers'; that is to say, of work- 
ingmcn from other parts of the country to 
take the places made vacant in the mills. 
Fifty of the men were brought in by one 
of the mills when the strike first began. 
They were arrested, kept in jail overnight, 
and given the alternative of getting out 
of town or standing trial. 

"They got out and the mills have not 
attempted to repeat the experiment." 



Oppose "No-Strike" Law. 

President Gompers told the House In- 
terstate Commerce Committee that anti- 
strike legislation in connection with the 
reorganization of the railroads will pro- 
duce lawbreakers who will violate the law, 
even if they have to go to jail for it. 

The trade unionist declared that any 
attempt to outlaw strikes is doomed be- 
forehand to failure, and that anti-strike 
legislation is intended to "put handcuffs 
on labor." 

Vice-President Doak of the Brotherhood 
of Railway Trainmen expressed the united 
opposition of the railroad brotherhoods. 
He urged the continuance of voluntary 
methods. 

The protest of the representatives of 
labor was because of a suggestion to the 
House committee by E. E. Clark, member 
of the Interstate Commerce Commission, 
that a board of five should be appointed to 
render final decision in any controversy 
where railroad employes and the manage- 
ment may fail to agree. The members of 
this board would be "absolutely disin- 
terested," and should be appointed by the 
President and confirmed by the Senate. 
Under this system strikes would be il- 
legal. 

Representative members of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor and of the rail- 
road brotherhoods declared that the 
scheme is the most sinister of the nu- 
merous anti-strike plans yet presented or 
suggested because it denies the workers 
representation on the final board. While 
the railroads are denied the same privi- 
lege, the workers say that experience 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, 328- 
332 West Randolph St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia, 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Au» 

tralia. 
26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 
Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 

New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Unions, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, 
London E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers, 4 Spekeland Bldg., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Internationale Trans]")ortarbeiter - Federation. 
Engelufer, 18, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts, Maritimes des France, 33 Rue Grange 
aux-Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord, 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboter-Union, Grev Wedels 
plads 5, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundt, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgaten IB., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Ccntrale Bond van Transportarbeiders, Hoofd- 
bestuur, 's Gravendykwal 111 te Rotterdam. 

Vakgroep Zeelieden, Pelikaanstraat 25, Rotter- 
dam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nationale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Geneva, Piazza S., Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina IS. Austria. 
SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calla Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo des Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Bcnedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 3SS Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



World*. Worker. 



A tremendous agitation